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Snowballing in the Winter

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  • #21
    I do not like the bubble pad either. Too much flexion and strain on the hoof.

    We have not had much snow this winter. I just had the boys reset a week or so ago and decided snow pads not needed. Of course then it started snowing....a lot!

    If you warm Forshners in the house and then roll large balls ready to go, keep them warm and press onto a clean sole that helps much. It has gotten the boys thru a week of deep snow and now we are melting off.

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by D Taylor View Post
      I do not like the bubble pad either. Too much flexion and strain on the hoof.
      How was the flexion and strain measured? How large was the test group?

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by deltawave View Post
        The bubble pads work no matter what kind of snow but IMO leave the hoof in worse shape come spring .........
        How so?

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
          ........The pop up pads have a reputation for inverting that can create real problems.
          Years ago, when 'popper pads' were used, this , because of their construction, would happen from time to time. Today's anti-snowball/popper pads are made quite differently and it is close to an impossibility for the 'ball/popper' to invert. In fact, I have never had it happen to a pad that I have installed during the 30+ years I have been providing hoof care services to the industry.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by Rick Burten View Post
            How so?
            Oy, I forgot the ultra-scrutinizers hang out on these threads, hypervigilant for any sign of personal opinion and gut feeling. Please allow me to amend my statement with "IN MY EXPERIENCE" and "OFTEN". A full pad, IME, often leaves the frogs in worse shape when the pad is taken off because inevitably at least some crud and moisture gets up in there and it's difficult to keep the sulci clean and the sole/frog can be perpetually moist if there are weeks and months of snow and no chance for the area to dry out even a little.

            Fully aware that oakum and other products can be used to somewhat counteract this phenomenon. My (certified) farrier and I have not used that option much. In our joint opinion, the rim pads are the way to go for this and other reasons. However, the bubble pads do (IMO! IME! YMMV!) a nice job of actually preventing snowballs and are an option, all pros and cons considered.

            All possible disclaimers claimed. No need to pursue the statement further. I'm not a farrier, didn't stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night, and I have no dog in any fight. God bless shoes, pads, farriers etc. etc. without which we'd all perish.
            Click here before you buy.

            Comment


            • #26
              Thought I would add to this with having used the bubble pads in the past, now using snow rim pads.

              The bubble pads DID work fairly well, though the padding, oakum and such, would often work out towards the end of the cycle. Bubble pads were the ONLY option that was dependable when we needed shod horses for Driving in winter. However back then, winters stayed snowy almost ALL WINTER. Bubble pads work fine in that setting, but not so much in our "new" weather of snow and mud.
              Stepping on the bubble in mud causes SUCTION of dirt, small stones into the pad. The dirt and mud will settle into bubble and pack up hard, so there is no flexion to remove the snow. Horse is then stuck on hard surface with sole all the time. And pulling off a full pad where packing is solid dirt, very little oakum, silicone left, makes for an ugly frog!

              The snow rim pads don't cover the sole, easy to see what the hoof looks like all the time. They don't hold rocks or dirt buildup. Work darn good on all sorts of snow for us. We do get a lot of snow, mud, during winters now, not a steady covering layer of snow. Our snow rim pads are the sofer, very flexible ones.

              Wear varies on the snow rim pads, depends on the horse wearing them if they can be reset. Some yes, some no. Shoes on the horses all have the smaller ice studs, providing good traction in all the winter footing changes.

              So unless the horse is in a location with constant snow cover, I wouldn't recommend using the bubble pads to keep snowballs out. Not worth the collection of dirt problems when snow is off the ground. Bubbles were good in their time, way better than nothing! I haven't found any of the topical application items, vasaline, cooking sprays, to work more than a few minutes!! Have not tried the ski wax, will have to think on that one. A MOVING horse with snap to the hooves, can fling snowballs out pretty good barefooted. But when horses trudge along slowly, snow will build up into snowballs.

              You might want to invest in a snowball hammer, they are GREAT tools for cleaning the barefoot horse of their buildup. Lots easier to quickly clean hooves than a hoof pick!! We have one and it does the job in about two CONTROLLED strikes on the snowball. Never touches the sole unless you drag the point around the inside of the hoof wall to clean out fragments. WEAR safety glasses using the snowball hammer!! Here are some examples:

              http://shelburnemuseum.blogspot.com/...mmer-time.html

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
                We're probably talking about the same ones :
                http://www.northeastfarrier.com/inde...dnosnow-1.html
                These seem to work best. Only downside, you can't often get a re-set out of them, because they may tear up more easily then the rigid Castle plastic ones, but then we're back to snowballing risk, lol.
                My farrier always used these and they seemed to work really well for my horse.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Tom Bloomer or Rick Burten:

                  What are your thoughts for using Vasoline on hoof walls & soles for snowy conditions?

                  I've been trying to keep my flat & thin-soled TB out of the snow to prevent abscesses but he is getting bad Spring fever. the waterproofing effect of Keratex hoof gel doesn't seem to last too long in the snow. Would love to here your opinions since you always give great feedback. Thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    IMO/IME Vasoline doesn't work well or long. If you are trying to keep moisture from penetrating the wall, then there are topical products out there that will do that but need to be renewed every few days for full efficacy. For the sole, I prefer Durasole though it is not a water barrier.
                    As concerns your horse, the snow will do him no harm. More worry attaches to ice, heaved ground and the like.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Rick Burten View Post
                      How was the flexion and strain measured? How large was the test group?
                      Strain- By the number of nails that damaged the hoof wall as they loosen vs when shod without bubble pads. Test group is limited to 3-4 crappy footed horse as they were the only ones that get shod here in the winter. I have no need for shoes on the better hooved horses here.

                      Flexion refers to materials (of the pad not the lower leg and hoof structure).

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        IOW, you are using conjecture for measurements and conclusions and have not factored in any other elements that may affect your conjecture. I think my sentiments in my signature line ably sum up the value of your comments for anyone with even a modicum of critical thinking and analysis capability. On the up side, you seem to be in the majority when it comes to pontificating on 'things equid'. Further proof that horsemen and women are a near extinct breed.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by D Taylor View Post
                          Strain- By the number of nails that damaged the hoof wall as they loosen vs when shod without bubble pads. Test group is limited to 3-4 crappy footed horse as they were the only ones that get shod here in the winter. I have no need for shoes on the better hooved horses here.

                          Flexion refers to materials (of the pad not the lower leg and hoof structure).
                          Plastic pads are heavy, and in my case, are always accompanied by traction control (borium studs for us) so they add to the weight. Maybe that is contributing to the nail damage?

                          While it's not an actual test group, my mare's feet are always the best in the winter, despite wearing bubble pads. I suppose not stomping after flies contributes, but I can't say that the bubble pads affect the nail holes on my mare.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Pour-in Snow Pads

                            I use a type of pour-in pad, for snow-ball prevention, that I can apply myself at any time in the shoeing cycle. This is a great alternative for those of us living in areas that get the occasional snow falls rather than months of snow covered ground.

                            Many people have seen farriers use the type of pour-in pads or hoof patching with the Vettec products.

                            http://vettec.com/equi-pak-180cc-instructions

                            I use a great DIY product called Hoof-It. There is no guns, mixing tips, etc, that you have to buy. You need a cheap throw-away paper or plastic cup and a stir stick. The product is a powder and a liquid which are mixed together and will set up into a semi-flexible pad. It is easiest to apply right after your horse is shod and kept standing on a paved surface. You need to apply to a clean hoof so obviously this timing is easiest. But I have routinely applied it at other times by doing a thorough picking then brushing with a mini wire brush.

                            There are directions on the mfgr web site for creating a typical hoof pad but I do it a bit differently when making a snow pad. I work and shape the pad material before it is set with a gloved hand so the material is pressed into the gap between shoe and sole then shape the suface of the "pad" so that it has a concave shape. Imagine you are looking at the inside of a very shallow bowl with the pad edges ending right up at the edges of the shoes ground surface. You can use your hand to make a smooth surfacewith a shallow concave shape that just doesn't hold snow. Snow will pack into right-angles and into that cranny between a shoe and sole but the shallow concave surface of the Hoof-it Snow pad allows snow to fall back out of the hoof bottom.

                            I more often use Hoof-it to make protective pads for my endurance horse when I find I will be competing on rocky trails and roads. The soles and frogs stay clean and healthy under this type of pad, a big improvement over standard pads. The is no issue with shoes becoming loose as a nailed on pad is compressed over and over. Mud and rocks do not get under a properly applied pour-in pad because it adheres to the hoof surface. I can also remove this pad with-out pulling the shoes. This is a WIN WIN hoof pad. I've added the mfgr directions below but I do use a lesser amount of liquid than they advise, varying it depending on the days temperature. You can also add short strands of fiberglass threads cut from the fiberglass fabric used to patch auto/boat fiberglass panels. Mixing the threads into the Hoof-it stretches it a bit further and seems to make it more flexible.

                            chicamuxen


                            Pad Mixing Instructions:
                            1. Thoroughly clean the sole of hoof, removing all debris and ensuring the hoof is dry.
                            2. Mix HOOF-it® Acrylic (2 parts powder to 1.5 parts liquid) in the measuring / mixing cup to a honey-like consistency and pour 1/2 of the HOOF-it® Acrylic mixture onto the hoof sole.
                            3. Using the applicator stick and wet gloves, press the HOOF-it® Acrylic resin onto sole, forming a seal where the shoe and sole meet. Now pour the remaining HOOF-it® Acrylic mixture to fill the rest of the sole area.
                            4. Set the hoof down on a clean surface and allow the HOOF-it® Acrylic pad to cure for approx. 2 min. The HOOF-it® Acrylic patch or pad can be removed at any time with a hoof pick or by softening the HOOF-it® Acrylic with a little dab of acetone if necessary.

                            Note: When the weather is hotter than 75 degrees F, add more liquid to thin the mixture to prevent premature setting of the acrylic.
                            Note: Use damp, soapy hands or gloves when handling or molding the acrylic during the curing and drying period

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Funny I always thought being a horseman involved simple observation and scrutiny especially when using a different product. I did not like what happens to the hoof wall on a couple horses after using them. My farrier told me he had seen similar issues with the product on others...one of which was a friends horse. We moved on to other.

                              I also really do think as a horse owner it is required to have a study that explores multivariable/causal studies to make such basic management choices that involve simple choices especially where other options are at hand. I did not like the product, my farrier had similar musings and we chose a different route /cost effective route and the issue was resolved.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by deltawave View Post
                                Oy, I forgot the ultra-scrutinizers hang out on these threads, hypervigilant for any sign of personal opinion and gut feeling. Please allow me to amend my statement with "IN MY EXPERIENCE" and "OFTEN".
                                Thank you!

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by D Taylor View Post
                                  Funny I always thought being a horseman involved simple observation and scrutiny especially when using a different product.
                                  IMNTBCHO, you thought/think(?) wrong. Being a horseman involves much more and is never an accolade or acknowledgement that is accorded to oneself by oneself.
                                  I did not like what happens to the hoof wall on a couple horses after using them. My farrier told me he had seen similar issues with the product on others...one of which was a friends horse. We moved on to other.
                                  Had you but said that in the first place, our entire discussion would have been unnecessary/moot.
                                  I also really do think as a horse owner it is required to have a study that explores multivariable/causal studies to make such basic management choices that involve simple choices especially where other options are at hand. I did not like the product, my farrier had similar musings and we chose a different route /cost effective route and the issue was resolved.
                                  In the first sentence, did you perhaps mean 'don't' instead of 'do'? Do you actually believe that management choices are simple? If so, that would explain why you present yourself as a horseowner who would not be called a horseman/woman.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by MissyA84 View Post
                                    The snow pads on my horse aren't working at all, so I'm curious if this is a good option.
                                    What kind of snow pads are on the horse now? I am confused because your second post indicates your farrier doesn't use popper pads and that you will ask about the rim pads. What other type is there?


                                    My shod horse used to get snow pads but now has pour-in pads (Equi-Pak) all around so he has problem with snow balls. He doesn't normally get the pour-ins on the hinds but they are shallow and have huge frogs so it didn't take much at all to fill them.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by Rick Burten View Post
                                      IMNTBCHO, you thought/think(?) wrong. Being a horseman involves much more and is never an accolade or acknowledgement that is accorded to oneself by oneself.

                                      Had you but said that in the first place, our entire discussion would have been unnecessary/moot.

                                      In the first sentence, did you perhaps mean 'don't' instead of 'do'? Do you actually believe that management choices are simple? If so, that would explain why you present yourself as a horseowner who would not be called a horseman/woman.
                                      Was simply saying it tongue and cheek but if you read it as a typo no harm done as you seem to get the meaning of my words. And yes most management but not all management choices are pretty simple for the most part. There are much more difficult topics I deal with daily then whats and ifs of horses. Tho I will admit the lessons learned from owning and enjoying horses continue for as long as you have interest in them.

                                      As for the post and the entire discsussion being moot then what is the point of having a forum to discuss topics at all? If the OP ar any other wishes more than a brief thumbs up or thumbs down personal opinion from me then they can ask. If they wish to chat with others they can. Really just that simple. Engage this person in a chat or that person and attempt to understand.

                                      Why toss out judgement into the conversation....hhhuummmm?

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by D Taylor View Post
                                        As for the post and the entire discsussion being moot then what is the point of having a forum to discuss topics at all?
                                        I was referring to the discussion between you and me. But once again, as so often occurs on these forums, its would seem that any requirement for reading for content in context with comprehension, critical thought and critical analysis, has been waived.
                                        Why toss out judgement into the conversation....hhhuummmm?
                                        Indeed, what place does judgement have in any conversation?

                                        Comment

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