• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

My TB's winter pasture board - need a little hand holding...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My TB's winter pasture board - need a little hand holding...

    Apologize for the length. Have a hard time narrowing it down...

    Moved to this barn in April. My soon to be 10yo OTTB is 2.5 years retired from 4 years on the NY circuit. Now on 24/7 pasture, with a run-in. BO takes very good care and consciencetious, but has only been doing this for 3 years and not really "brought up" with horses. My guy the first TB at her barn.

    He is 16.3 and fine boned. Has kissing spine and a little arthritis, but also attitude, which 24/7 turn-out has helped with immensely. Been a handful to train, but we now have a good trainer (away for the winter) who has helped me figure him out. There is an indoor and plan on continuing riding for the winter, working towards eventing training in the spring. Just taking a short break (2 weeks?) for both of us. 1) snow, 2) I'm starting a new business.

    Lots of snow last week and we're back to "the way it used to be" up here - snow and cold and snow. BO had plans to move him and a buddy into a big, big pasture (one of their hay fields) and we did so on Friday. Had been in a smaller one during the day, with a 3 stall run-in, and a mini . Their yard opened at night into a medium sized pasture near the house for grazing. Smaller one became frozen and cuppy. New big, big one full of deep snow, heated trough, and a large run-in. But also has snowmobile trails along the far side. Probably about 300' from the run-in. BO's DH said first day my guy handled them going by fine, since buddy used to them...

    Friday was also 8 weeks post last farrier visit. We've been talking week to week as I've given reports on his feet - horse has always had shoes. With the huge snowstorm we had up here, farrier suggested we pull them, and just see how it goes for him barefoot for the time being. Feet have been an issue with us. He's a fly stomper in the summer, and they were breaking off and requiring patches regularly. Plus substitute farrier did an awful job on him in July trimming him severely. We are just now back to an acceptable foot length, but I have been able to ride since late Sept.

    Started Keratex application today. Won't ride him for 7-10 days. Will see how he goes in the indoor then. Any issues being barefoot, we'll go back to shoes, with snowpads and borium for the winter. I'll probably ride him 3-4 times a week, mostly in the indoor, but also along the roads briefly on sunny days.

    As I said, right now it is COLD. He's not clipped, and has a medium Rambo blanket. Also has the hood, which I added for the storm, but the temps were in the mid 20's yesterday, and he was reportedly rolling constantly, so thought I'd remove it.

    When I came in today, he had icicles (my poor boy - but Mom will get used to it!) and quite a bit of snow on him, but warm under his blanket. I brought him into his assigned stall indoors to do his feet, and he was very anxious inside alone. Tomorrow I'll bring his buddy back inside to help keep him quiet (buddy upset, too).

    1) He is walking fine on his feet for now. They haven't flaked at all. Granted, he is only walking on snow or soft footing in the indoor. But with hoof issues this summer he was hardly putting one foot in front of the other. What should I watch for? Be cognizant of while barefoot? Any other recommendations? (Have already read a few of the threads here.)

    2) He's also anxious with this new routine, and a wide open field with only the one buddy. The smaller field was close to the others with 3 other horses and a couple of "killer" llamas. The herd was all set. And having been a knucklehead in the past, reacting to all kinds of changes ("interesting" clinic this summer...) but who quieted down with the lengthy turn-out. Not all that bad when I left today as he and buddy were quietly eating hay back in their big, big pasture. But when I had arrived, they were very anxious. We have great hay, from the farm here, but before the snow, he could always dig at the remnants.

    Do I worry about ulcers, or anything else anxiety related? He had them on the track, and I did a month's worth of Gastrogard this spring based on his behavior, with no improvement until I moved him here.

    3) Being a TB, what should I watch for condition wise? He isn't at all overweight, but neither has he been a hard keeper. Gets Nutrena Safechoice, and "unlimited hay" (but, well, it is limited, but not unreasonably), a daily naproxen for a little arthritis, isoxuprin is prescribed for his feet, and I've added SmartShine. Took away his Vitamin E when he was brought here, but adding it back capsule form now. I may go to a more comprehensive supplement in the spring...?

    Just want to make sure I'm watching out for him, without being too concerned about his frosty appearance! Grown up in Upstate NY, and been through a lot of awful winters, being around a lot of horses. But most have been on half day, instead of full turn-out. The smaller field was almost like a relaxing wandering in and out of the run-in. The big, big one is, well, big, and wide open! So I'm a "little" nervous.

    Thanks for plowing through this, and any suggestions!
    But he thought, "This procession has got to go on." So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn't there at all. H.C.Anderson

  • #2
    A bottle a scotch will do amazing things.

    Not for the horse, for you

    He will be FINE. Take a deep breath, give him a week or two and see what he's like then. My guess is all the anxiety you're seeing due to the routine change will be gone. He might still be nervous if you bring him in alone, so bring in his friend, too, or just know what to expect. Unless it gets very squishy and then very hard, I can't imagine he's going to have any problems with his feet.

    I'd keep an eye on his condition since he's on the naproxen and that would make me worry about ulcers, but I don't think there's anything about the way you're keeping him now that's a red flag or concerning in the least. He's going to dig his accommodations and life style

    Comment


    • #3
      I would be a little concerned about the ulcers given the meds, the fact that he's an OTTB, and that he has a history of them. But depending on the diet and how long his anxiety lasts it may not be an issue. If it were me, I would be doing a preventative dose of GG or pop rocks given the increased anxiety.

      I'm sure his feet will be fine, just keep an eye on them. Same thing with weight, which I would imagine wont be a problem if it hasn't been in the past.

      Good luck from a fellow OTTB lover!
      "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

      Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue

      Comment


      • #4
        I am from upstate NY and know the winters you are talking about! My OTTB is same age as yours, and with me near DC now. First of all, I agree with Simkie about the bottle of scotch! My coach recently reminded me that "Stalls are for people, not horses". Your boy will LOVE his huge turnout. It's good for him, especially if he is ulcer prone. Your blanketing sounds fine and having a regular supply of hay will keep him warm and busy. I agree with your keratex plan, just be careful not to over-use it (I use it 2x a week with great success) and dont get it near the coronet band. He should be fine barefoot on the footing you described. Is the footing causing him to slip and step on himself a bit? If so I would throw a good pair of bell boots on him and just keep them on for protection. My ottb wears them 24/7.

        I agree with OTTBcooper about a maintenance dose for ulcer prevention. My OTTB gets UGUARD every day which helps him (not everyone agrees it works, its really just an antacid), but I have started with preventive poprocks and have seem a marked improvement in his overall disposition. However, having lots of turnout and free choice hay/pasture will be really good for ulcers too. I guess if I were you I would use something to get him through this time, then wean him off once he is used to his regular routine.

        Good luck and have fun with him!
        "I am still under the impression there is nothing alive quite so beautiful
        as a thoroughbred horse."

        -JOHN GALSWORTHY

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thanks, everyone, for all the answers! I even have a bottle of Scotch, purchased for the family holiday gathering, but Scotch favoring members backed off, leaving me with a full bottle. Maybe I will have to take the medicine...

          Am a little confused about the ulcer/Gastrogard issues. I know he was given a month of Gastrogard at the track at some point(s). And I did it in the spring, but before he had adequate turn out. Then, as he was on plenty of grass until the past couple of weeks, but could still 'pick 'n graze', was wondering about it now on so much snow.

          The Gastrogard didn't change a thing, but would I still have to start with that ($$$) or can I just do the pop rocks? Have been eyeing the idea from reading about it on here.

          He does LOVE to roll. One good thing about the snow - he no longer has a mud caked mane/legs/face(including his eyelashes!). Nice and clean! Always been the 'sensitive skin' type. Hates flies. Was touchy initially during training. Can still get ornery with too much leg. But SO much happier NOT being stalled all the time.

          Think I now, however, have my instructions about how to bring in the New Year's!
          But he thought, "This procession has got to go on." So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn't there at all. H.C.Anderson

          Comment


          • #6
            He really sounds as though he is doing fine. The best part is the comment about his feet. If he can stay barefoot through the winter, and is sound in the indoor, I'd relax. It sounds as though he is getting adequate hay which is important in this cold weather.

            Just think Spring.
            Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

            Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

            Comment


            • #7
              Excellent! I hope it's a nicely aged single malt. My favorite!!

              If you are seriously concerned about his stomach, or if you'd just like a little protection there, you can start right off with the pop rocks. You could even try the preventative dose instead of the treatment dose. As long as there is something to protect it through the stomach omeprazole is omeprazole is omeprazole.

              As long as he's got plenty of hay, though, and is not very stressed, I would be inclined to just leave him be. Since he's out 24/7 now, you might even be able to stop or reduce his naproxen--an NSAID is far more likely, IMO, to cause problems with his stomach.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CVPeg View Post

                Am a little confused about the ulcer/Gastrogard issues. I know he was given a month of Gastrogard at the track at some point(s). And I did it in the spring, but before he had adequate turn out. Then, as he was on plenty of grass until the past couple of weeks, but could still 'pick 'n graze', was wondering about it now on so much snow.

                The Gastrogard didn't change a thing, but would I still have to start with that ($$$) or can I just do the pop rocks? Have been eyeing the idea from reading about it on here.

                He does LOVE to roll. One good thing about the snow - he no longer has a mud caked mane/legs/face(including his eyelashes!). Nice and clean! Always been the 'sensitive skin' type. Hates flies. Was touchy initially during training. Can still get ornery with too much leg. But SO much happier NOT being stalled all the time.

                Think I now, however, have my instructions about how to bring in the New Year's!
                As you're in NY, I'd pick up some of the omeprazole paste from this company - with the combined NSAID & anxiety, if he's ulcer prone (not sure if he's ever scoped positive), I'd just treat for a month or so, then taper off over ~ 2weeks.

                With the arthritis, you might try adding an oral supplement such as Recovery EQ HA - some horses show great response, some limited, some not at all ...
                his reactivity suggests that he has some issue but it also sounds like you are a great person for him

                (the pop rocks would be fine too, just suspect you'll run into some shipping delays & I'd start the omeprazole sooner rather than later)

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Great - thanks, Alto! - ordering the omeprazole paste, maybe even the pop rocks for later.

                  And like the idea of the supplement. The naproxen is a left over suggestion from previous barn owner - whose only real horse knowledge seemed to be meds. Well, it did seem to work - but ID'd only after he was injured at the old barn in their iffy turnouts, and he needed a shot of bute . Have thought about adding a glucosamine/chondroitin supplement all along. I haven't been happy continuing it either, Simkie.

                  And no, not a single malt . BIL picked it up for me on their way to the house. But with the snow we have, who can tell?

                  Happy New Year, everyone!
                  But he thought, "This procession has got to go on." So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn't there at all. H.C.Anderson

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Make sure to groom him weekly, take that blanket off so you can see his condition. Mine didn't have his blanket off until his Coggins/ rabies shot last February(they had to take a digital picture for the Coggins). And whoops, he was skinny under the blanket, but no one had checked, he looked fine with the blanket on. BO then upped his feed. But do check him out naked once a week.

                    PS my retired barefoot for over a decade TB got 4 barium shoes in his new barn because of the ice/snow in his big field, so don't be surprised if that comes up as an issue.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Try MSM for starters. It would probably be a good idea to get him off the naproxen...how much are you giving him?

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Chall, am bringing him in daily doing the Keratex, and rubbing my hands underneath his blanket (which he hates!) because of my concern about the change in turnout. Plus he drops weight with anxiety, but it's usually short lived. Got pictures back from the fall clinic, where he had stayed overnight with lots of strange horses and yikes! Will be back riding him after the weekend regularly so he'll be getting the once over often!

                        LauraKY - gets one tablet 1x a day - as I sit here, can't remember the dosage, but just OTC human. Nothing high.

                        NB 3:30 - Just returned from the barn. The dosage is 220mg per tablet.

                        He's looking good. The boys were really enthused about coming in for a short "hay break" while I did my guy's feet. Felt his legs - all seems fine. Feet looking good. Removed his blanket and everything looks good. It is very gusty and lots of snow blowing around. One car off the road near the barn. With the bite the winds are adding, I put his hood back on.

                        As soon as I turned them back out, my guy went about his business digging for grass. So he has it all figured out. Think I will try a little taste of that cheap stuff. Time to do bills, so will help that as well!
                        Last edited by CVPeg; Jan. 1, 2013, 04:34 PM.
                        But he thought, "This procession has got to go on." So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn't there at all. H.C.Anderson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          He will be fine! young, healthy horse, in a huge field with a buddy, food, blanket and a shelter! And it sounds like you get out to see him often, which means you'll catch any problems quickly. Drink a toast to his living situation, because it sounds like you scored.

                          I bet barefoot for the winter is going to be really good for him, with the added bonus of not having to worry about lost shoes in the mud in the spring. My TB's have always been the type who act like their legs have been amputated when we tried to pull shoes, so be glad yours has nice soft cold snow for the transition.

                          I hate icicles, too. My best trick is to throw a rainsheet on over the winter blanket for wet snows or really windy days, so if it gets totally encrusted with ice I can pull it off and he still has a dry blanket to wear.

                          Not to give you things to worry about, but the two things I'd watch for would be blanket rubs (just because) and punctures to legs. The reason I even mention punctures is because once the snow covers everything, they lose their landmarks and if they get charging around, set off by snowmobiles, for example, they might plow through a section of the pasture they would normally avoid. My TB did that one year and we nursed a puncture above his knee for weeks - not much fun in January.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X