• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Chronic Diarrhea

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    In response to keeping the hind end/tail clean...

    If the tail bags don't work for you, have you tried liberally coating the tail with Showsheen so the manure can't stick as easily? I would also coat the hind legs with either Showsheen or some type of product (like baby oil gel) so the manure won't stick to the hair and scald the skin. Sometimes you have to play around to find the right product.
    http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #22
      Originally posted by mkevent View Post
      In response to keeping the hind end/tail clean...

      If the tail bags don't work for you, have you tried liberally coating the tail with Showsheen so the manure can't stick as easily? I would also coat the hind legs with either Showsheen or some type of product (like baby oil gel) so the manure won't stick to the hair and scald the skin. Sometimes you have to play around to find the right product.
      I've tried baby oil and show sheen. But, I can't say that I've been super liberal with it. It's definitely worth a try. I've haven't used it on her legs though. Thanks!

      Originally posted by twhs View Post
      We had problem with diarrhea for two years, trying everything! Certain time of the year, or a particular product, or taking new advice would appear like the problem was solved but it was always temporary. Finally, tho (and I should knock on wood) and for almost a year, we have wonderful poop. What we did was switch off hay entirely and began feeding speedi-beet mixed with Triple Crown feed and Timothy pellets. We feed 3 - 4 times a day depending on the pony's workload. A friend at a neighboring barn feeds her horse a similar diet and for the same reason and it's worked well for her, too. Both her horse and our pony graze in pasture w grazing muzzles. Hope this helps.
      That's the thing. She's only usually on hay for half the year and the other half she's out on pasture. She even wore a grazing muzzle 24/7 for a good part of the summer a couple years ago (she needed help so she didn't explore weight wise). She's actually worse on pasture. Lots of almost liquid manure. But, it doesn't stick in her tail for some odd reason.

      As a side note, she does terribly on soy and not great on beet pulp (though she's on it now). We also had a founder scare a year ago (turns out it likely was multiple abscesses in her hind feet, and all her blood tests were normal, but I'm super cautious about her weight right now)... Mare is definitely a walking vet bill...


      Originally posted by Meadow36 View Post
      S. boullardii is a probiotic that has been proven in horses to be useful for colitis in hospital settings. Mostly used for acute colitis (like associated with antibiotics, stress or colic); but I know a lot of vets prescribing it for chronic cases with good success. It certainly couldn't hurt and it's not that expensive (about $1/day for the Swanson product).

      You can buy it at a store like GMC, or I get it online from Swanson. 3 capsules twice a day (the Swanson ones easily twist apart and you can sprinkle it on the feed).
      Thanks, I'll look into it. Definitely worth a try. She'll eat anything so they shouldn't be too much of an issue.

      Comment


      • #23
        Vaseline or desitin both work well on the bum - and help soothe the chaffed areas also.

        Comment


        • #24
          Is she blanketed in the winter?

          Just asking because sometimes blankets with tail covers don't allow them to lift their tails as high, possibly contributing to the manure on the tail/legs issue.
          http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

          Comment


          • #25
            [QUOTE=pompeiii;6734821]
            She's actually worse on pasture. Lots of almost liquid manure. But, it doesn't stick in her tail for some odd reason.
            QUOTE]

            Sounds like classic hind gut acidosis. Often perturbed by forages higher in sugar and fructans....especially fresh pasture. These are more issue than grains for some horses cuz when you think about it they eat so much more forage as a percent of the ration.

            Get some soyhull pellets. Start slowly increasing the pellets and replace about 6lbs of hay with the soyhull pellets. Soaking hay may help too, but some hays are still too high even after soaked for these horses with more delicate hindguts.

            Also get some Diarsynal Plus. This is what I am talking about...

            http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...20plus%20paste

            You are wasting money on probiotics until you change the environment of the horses hind gut. That requires a diet of fermentable fiber very, very low in NSC and really paying attention to WSC.

            Beet pulp may or may not be low enough. As you said she does not do so great on it. There is actually a pretty wide range of NSC (and WSC) for beet pulp. Some of it not really so low. Maybe the processing in older plants is a factor there but I really do not know.

            Oat hulls can be great too. But hard to find. But what I do is buy mill run light weight oats (not premium) and feed in moderation. These are more hull and less groat. Oat bran in moderation is also smart as a great source of beta glucan. Oat bran is harder to find tho.

            Here is a list and keep in mind you need to put together a strict diet low not just in NSC but emphasis on low WSC...

            http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/Forms/NSCCircular.pdf

            Comment


            • #26
              My gelding had watery manure the first few years I had him. Vet said not to worry about it, it wasn't bad enough to cause dehydration, and she said a lot of horses have this issue. I tried ProBios with no success.

              This spring I put both horses on SmartHoof, mostly for the copper and zinc. It also contains a probiotic. His manure firmed right up! You might try SmartHoof, or SmartDigest. Both are pretty cheap to try as an experiment. Whatever they are using seemed to really help my gelding!

              Comment


              • #27
                Chronic diarrhea - in an otherwise healthy horse?

                I absolutely swear by Vapco's DIGEST IT, and I have used it for over 8 years. I had a terrible time solving chronic diarrhea in my HEALTHY Thoroughbred gelding from the day I got him, and I tried everything - Probios and a half dozen other similar products. The ONLY thing that worked was Digest It. (And he pretty much grew new feet after I started to use their product BEAR CAT, at a farrier's recommendation.) My horse has a primarily grass pasture and grass hay based diet, and if he misses even a few days worth of his Digest It, the diarrhea comes back. I stock pile it...

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by Meadow36 View Post
                  S. boullardii is a probiotic ...
                  You can buy it at a store like GMC, or I get it online from Swanson. 3 capsules twice a day (the Swanson ones easily twist apart and you can sprinkle it on the feed).
                  Be careful here--I got some Florastor (S. boullardii for humans) and opened the capsules. My horse wouldn't eat his food. So I took a taste of the powder--horrible! No idea if all brands taste so bad.
                  My boy has chronic diarrhea. I've used Proviable EQ, which has Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to help in some of his worse episodes. Using 10 mL of Probios gel 2-3 times a week usually keeps it under control. I've also used Immediate Response in some of the worse times too. I also get him high fat, high fiber grain--currently TC Senior.
                  That's fine, many of us have slid down this slippery slope and became very happy (and broke) doing it. We may not have a retirement, but we have memories ...

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    I use the Swanson caps daily on a mare that is currently on antibiotics for a tooth. She eats them readily opened up and sprinkled on feed (and she is a VERY picky eater).

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #30
                      Originally posted by mkevent View Post
                      Is she blanketed in the winter?

                      Just asking because sometimes blankets with tail covers don't allow them to lift their tails as high, possibly contributing to the manure on the tail/legs issue.
                      That's a really good point. Combined with the less than liquid poop in the winter, the tail flap of her blanket might be in the way. I might have too look at blankets without tail flaps in the future for her. Of course, she JUST got a new turnout a week and a half ago and my horses are very easy on clothing, but I'll keep my eyes open come blanket sale time.

                      Originally posted by D Taylor View Post

                      Sounds like classic hind gut acidosis. Often perturbed by forages higher in sugar and fructans....especially fresh pasture. These are more issue than grains for some horses cuz when you think about it they eat so much more forage as a percent of the ration.

                      Get some soyhull pellets. Start slowly increasing the pellets and replace about 6lbs of hay with the soyhull pellets. Soaking hay may help too, but some hays are still too high even after soaked for these horses with more delicate hindguts.

                      Also get some Diarsynal Plus. This is what I am talking about...

                      http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...20plus%20paste

                      You are wasting money on probiotics until you change the environment of the horses hind gut. That requires a diet of fermentable fiber very, very low in NSC and really paying attention to WSC.

                      Beet pulp may or may not be low enough. As you said she does not do so great on it. There is actually a pretty wide range of NSC (and WSC) for beet pulp. Some of it not really so low. Maybe the processing in older plants is a factor there but I really do not know.

                      Oat hulls can be great too. But hard to find. But what I do is buy mill run light weight oats (not premium) and feed in moderation. These are more hull and less groat. Oat bran in moderation is also smart as a great source of beta glucan. Oat bran is harder to find tho.

                      Here is a list and keep in mind you need to put together a strict diet low not just in NSC but emphasis on low WSC...

                      http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/Forms/NSCCircular.pdf
                      Thanks. This is sort of what I suspect is going on. The problem is, eliminating forage (or severely reducing) isn't necessarily easy/an option. I have 3 horses who live at home. They live out 24/7 with access to a run in shed. I can divide them for grain type meals, but without locking her in the small dry lot, alone, 24/7, I can't keep her off pasture/out of the hay. Not to mention the others would not have access to shelter either. With my current set up, removing these things would be incredibly challenging. And boarding the (often crippled) mare isn't an option financially right now either.

                      Ultimately, it's finding a balance of things that keep her comfortable and healthy as possible. She stays very hydrated (she's a big drinker) and her weight is typically decent. As long as she's comfortable and happy, then we'll keep moving forward. Once something becomes too much for her (arthritis, diarrhea, weight, pain, etc.), then it's time to say goodbye.

                      But, you've given me a lot to think about. While not practical right now (winter), this might be something to try in the summer when the pasture is back with a grazing muzzle. She does have a soy allergy but I know people say the soy hulls shouldn't be an issue. She also typically does VERY well on oats. I might see about finding oat bran and replacing the beet pulp with that. I'll talk to my two main feed stores and see what they can find/order.

                      Originally posted by newhorsemommy View Post
                      My gelding had watery manure the first few years I had him. Vet said not to worry about it, it wasn't bad enough to cause dehydration, and she said a lot of horses have this issue. I tried ProBios with no success.

                      This spring I put both horses on SmartHoof, mostly for the copper and zinc. It also contains a probiotic. His manure firmed right up! You might try SmartHoof, or SmartDigest. Both are pretty cheap to try as an experiment. Whatever they are using seemed to really help my gelding!
                      Interesting. She's been on a bunch of different supplements but it's worth looking at ingredients. Her hooves used to be terrible (she was super abscess prone), but since changing feeds in the spring, her hooves look incredibly and knock on wood...

                      Originally posted by SummersPastFarm View Post
                      I absolutely swear by Vapco's DIGEST IT, and I have used it for over 8 years. I had a terrible time solving chronic diarrhea in my HEALTHY Thoroughbred gelding from the day I got him, and I tried everything - Probios and a half dozen other similar products. The ONLY thing that worked was Digest It. (And he pretty much grew new feet after I started to use their product BEAR CAT, at a farrier's recommendation.) My horse has a primarily grass pasture and grass hay based diet, and if he misses even a few days worth of his Digest It, the diarrhea comes back. I stock pile it...
                      Thanks for the recommendation.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X