• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Wide vs. narrow horse shoes?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wide vs. narrow horse shoes?

    I recently switched farriers. The new farrier used shoes that are narrower than what had previously been on my horse. Why would a farrier choose wider vs narrower shoes? What are the effects for the horse?
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince

  • #2
    Originally posted by retrofit View Post
    I recently switched farriers. The new farrier used shoes that are narrower than what had previously been on my horse. Why would a farrier choose wider vs narrower shoes? What are the effects for the horse?
    In all likelihood it was probably a different make of shoe from a different company just to take a shot in the dark about it.

    Aside from that reasons for choosing wider vs narrower are:
    1) Proper fit for the horse.
    In most cases the web works best when it's double the width of the horse's hoof wall at the toe. This is not a hard and fast rule but majority of the time works pretty well.

    2) Floatation vs Traction
    Sometimes when more or less traction is desired it can be adjusted with shoe design in this way. Use of the horse and ground conditions are factored in as well.
    YMMV

    Now, why aren't you asking your farrier instead of a bunch of strangers on the internet?
    Last edited by sonofasailor; Dec. 10, 2012, 10:29 AM.
    For more fun talk and a chatroom too visit www.horseshoersforum.invisionzone.com
    Stop in and say hello

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by sonofasailor View Post
      Now, why aren't you asking your farrier instead of a bunch of strangers on the internet?
      Because I won't see him for another few weeks
      "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by retrofit View Post
        Because I won't see him for another few weeks
        He doesn't have a phone?!?!?!

        Seriously, you pay for a service and you're entitled to an explanation of the 5Ws of that service.

        Technology, here, is your friend!

        G.
        Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          OK seriously, I plan to ask my farrier when I see him next. This is not an urgent matter and I don't need to take time out of his busy schedule to call him with a trivial question. But meanwhile I'm curious, and asking questions / getting answers seems to be a primary function of this forum. Is this no longer the case? Should we warn the COTH ad subscribers that it is no longer acceptable to ask or answer questions on the internet, and site hits are about to take a precipitous drop?
          "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince

          Comment


          • #6
            i would also call and ask. it would make me nervous, and i would have asked at the time, but i don't think it is trivial at all. Every horse is different and i am sure he has a reason. If not, i would wonder about the farrier..

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by retrofit View Post
              OK seriously, I plan to ask my farrier when I see him next. This is not an urgent matter and I don't need to take time out of his busy schedule to call him with a trivial question. But meanwhile I'm curious, and asking questions / getting answers seems to be a primary function of this forum. Is this no longer the case? Should we warn the COTH ad subscribers that it is no longer acceptable to ask or answer questions on the internet, and site hits are about to take a precipitous drop?
              Asking a question, here or anywhere else, is a good way to get general information.

              Asking a question of the farrier who put on a set of shoes unlike those that went before is neither a "general question" nor is it a "trivial question." It's a fair and honest question.

              Clearly the difference made you take your time to ask here. If it's that important drop a dime and ask the one person who knows for sure!!!!!

              G.
              Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

              Comment


              • #8
                Maybe your farrier only had narrow shoes on the truck that day.
                "There is no fundamental difference between man and animals in their ability to feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery." - Charles Darwin

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by retrofit View Post
                  I recently switched farriers. The new farrier used shoes that are narrower than what had previously been on my horse. Why would a farrier choose wider vs narrower shoes? What are the effects for the horse?
                  The OP didn't ask why HER farrier chose to use one shoe versus another. It would seem she just wants general reasons for why a farrier might choose one over another.
                  "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is just the kind of question I would think up right before bed, and ask you oh-so-helpful COTHers before I forgot about it. Plus, it's always nice to hear what many other people think, just to have that much more information to ponder.

                    Great question, can anybody actually provide an answer? Or are we all supposed to be telling the OP they're being dumb?
                    "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Me View Post
                      In all likelihood it was probably a different make of shoe from a different company just to take a shot in the dark about it.

                      Aside from that reasons for choosing wider vs narrower are:
                      1) Proper fit for the horse.
                      In most cases the web works best when it's double the width of the horse's hoof wall at the toe. This is not a hard and fast rule but majority of the time works pretty well.

                      2) Floatation vs Traction
                      Sometimes when more or less traction is desired it can be adjusted with shoe design in this way. Use of the horse and ground conditions are factored in as well.
                      YMMV
                      Originally posted by Ainsley688 View Post

                      Great question, can anybody actually provide an answer? Or are we all supposed to be telling the OP they're being dumb?
                      What part of this reply didn't you understand?
                      For more fun talk and a chatroom too visit www.horseshoersforum.invisionzone.com
                      Stop in and say hello

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Narrower/thinner shoes are usually cheaper and require less work to shape.

                        They weigh less and therefore alter movement less.

                        They may be a better choice for thin-walled horses because the nail placement tends to be closer to the edge.

                        They provide more traction but less support and ground surface protection.

                        Jennifer
                        Third Charm Event Team

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by ThirdCharm View Post
                          Narrower/thinner shoes are usually cheaper and require less work to shape.

                          They weigh less and therefore alter movement less.

                          They may be a better choice for thin-walled horses because the nail placement tends to be closer to the edge.

                          They provide more traction but less support and ground surface protection.

                          Jennifer
                          Thanks Jennifer! I appreciate the factual answer.

                          For those of you wondering why I didn't ask my farrier at the time ... my mare is not always cooperative for the farrier. It had gotten worse due to ulcers which were still being treated at the time, plus she was coming off a short lay-up for a leg injury. I was pretty concerned about how she would behave so I was really focusing in on her and I didn't even notice the change in shoes until I picked her feet the next day. This time around she is feeling much better and back in regular work, so I should be able to watch a little more & ask any questions at the time.
                          "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sonofasailor View Post
                            What part of this reply didn't you understand?
                            Probably too technical.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by retrofit View Post
                              Thanks Jennifer! I appreciate the factual answer.
                              Not all of it is accurate or scientifically factual.

                              A wide shoe provides no more "support" than a narrow shoe. The weight bearing surface area (that which the shoe "supports") of the hoof wall on top of the shoe is exactly the same regardless of whether it is standing on a wide shoe, a narrow shoe, or barefoot on a flat hard surface. What is different is the ground force dynamics of how a wide vs. narrow, vs, round, vs flat, vs concave shoe interacts with the ground, how far and fast the shoe itself penetrates into soft ground, and how much resistance or reduction of resistance the shoe provides to turnover in various soil conditions.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I meant 'support' in terms of a wide shoe tending to 'sink' less in soft footing, providing more support for the limb overall in the stance phase of the stride. Obviously it doesn't contact any more of the hoof wall, since you're not SUPPOSED to have contact inside the white line.

                                Jennifer
                                Third Charm Event Team

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by ThirdCharm View Post
                                  I meant 'support' in terms of a wide shoe tending to 'sink' less in soft footing,
                                  Yes. The opposite of sink is float.

                                  providing more support for the limb overall in the stance phase of the stride.
                                  Still wrong. You just earned an eph in fisics for pharriers.

                                  Once the foot is planted in the stance phase nothing is different regardless of what kind of shoe is under the hoof. The type of shoe only has an effect on impact, load acceptance, unloading, static and dynamic friction, and flight.

                                  Obviously it doesn't contact any more of the hoof wall, since you're not SUPPOSED to have contact inside the white line.
                                  Why not? A barefoot horse makes contact with the ground inside the white line every time it loads its foot. Glue-on shoes are glued with full contact in this area. Why should a nailed shoe be any different?

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    If the shoe has greater surface area and doesn't sink as deeply into the ground, particularly at the heels, it provides more support for the soft tissues of the leg. If you don't think so try walking across a lawn in skinny heeled shoes. Then explain to your shoeing clients how you sprained your ankle, should be good for some laughs, eh big guy?

                                    I'm aware that glue-on shoes have full contact, I was referring to the commonly used guidelines of the major certifying organizations that specify 'no sole contact inside the white line'. Regardless it couldn't contact any more hoof wall than a narrower shoe, because the hoof wall doesn't change in width and it would take a very narrow shoe indeed to not cover the width of the hoof wall.

                                    Jennifer
                                    Third Charm Event Team

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by ThirdCharm View Post
                                      If the shoe has greater surface area and doesn't sink as deeply into the ground, particularly at the heels, it provides more support for the soft tissues of the leg.
                                      Wrong again. Where do you come up with this silly drivel?

                                      Narrow vs. wide shoes that are fit to the same footprint do not change the A/P orientation of the loaded foot in the stance phase on soft ground. They only change the loading/unloading dynamics. To change the loaded orientation you must either change the base angle or the A/P base length distribution (effective angle) in relation to the center of weight bearing of the foot - which is in the front half of the foot.

                                      If the loaded angle does not change, then soft tissue stress and strain while loaded does not change either. That's math, not speculation.

                                      If you don't think so try walking across a lawn in skinny heeled shoes.
                                      That is a really stupid analogy. Your skinny heeled shoe is supporting your weight on a line through your calcaneus and in case you hadn't noticed, you really can't walk on your toes very long without having something to support your calcaneus because the human foot is heel loaded in stance weight bearing until elevated to unnatural angles, whereas the horse's foot is toe loaded in stance weight bearing regardless of angle due to the fact that P3 is located in the front half of the foot and the weight bearing is transmitted from P2 to P3 through the DIJ.

                                      Then explain to your shoeing clients how you sprained your ankle, should be good for some laughs, eh big guy?
                                      What is good for some laughs is your ridiculous assertions in regards to equine locomotion and even more ridiculous attempts to make them analogous with human locomotion. Methinks your heels have sunk so far your knuckles are dragging.

                                      Why not quit pretending you have a clue about how this stuff actually works while you're behind.

                                      I'm aware that glue-on shoes have full contact, I was referring to the commonly used guidelines of the major certifying organizations that specify 'no sole contact inside the white line'.
                                      So your "authority" is the arbitrary testing criteria used on farrier certification exams, not a biomechanical explanation. I left the door open here for you to impress me with an essay on foot flutter lameness and the mechanics of point load distribution.

                                      What farrier certification exams have you passed? AAPF?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
                                        Wrong again. Where do you come up with this silly drivel?

                                        That is a really stupid analogy.

                                        What is good for some laughs is your ridiculous assertions...Methinks your heels have sunk so far your knuckles are dragging.

                                        Why not quit pretending you have a clue about how this stuff actually works while you're behind.

                                        So your "authority" is the arbitrary testing criteria used on farrier certification exams, not a biomechanical explanation. I left the door open here for you to impress me with an essay on foot flutter lameness and the mechanics of point load distribution.

                                        What farrier certification exams have you passed? AAPF?
                                        I personally would love to impress your hind end parts with my boot, but alas, I have to settle for the ignore list. Your customer service is just astounding.
                                        Somewhere in the world, Jason Miraz is Goodling himself and wondering why "the chronicle of the horse" is a top hit. CaitlinAndTheBay

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X