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my horse has ringworm :(

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  • my horse has ringworm :(

    Ya, so I am totally NOT happy about it found out my horse has ringworm ( got it from using same tack) and I feel horrible. I put some betadine on it to start killing the fungi's, but I left it on to long and he had an allergic reaction to it and swelled up everywhere I put it. The girth area, and his arm pits, it was so swollen he didn't want to walk, Made me feel pretty bad. BUT I read a lot of different things to do. and that pretty much I can treat it so that doesn't spread, but it really just has to run its course.

    I put the betadine on it, and the rinsed that off and gave him a bath with a Chlorehexidine shampoo and then put vinegar on it, let him dry and put a sulfur based ointment on it, Nu-Stock. all things that I had read that helped. I'm not looking forward to having to buy new grooming equip. and stuff like that. But I'm not really familiar with this since I have never had to treat it. Any suggestion of things I should look out for? and other ways to treat it and with what?? I know theres a lot of ways to do it and was just curious as to what others tried and what worked for them

    Thank you
    Last edited by RoseBud143; Sep. 25, 2008, 04:41 PM.
    Posted with my Android smartphone.

  • #2
    Desitin, or the generic version--make sure it's the white cream with zinc oxide in it. I have used it on some kittens that had ringworm and it works on horses that get scratches or other boo-boos.
    "Humans will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple,
    or more direct than does Nature." ~Leonardo da Vinci

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Is it true that you really cant cure it up faster even with treatment? I keep reading that it just needs to run it course. And that young horses are more likely to get it, and then uild up their immunity towards it and not develop it agian. (mines 2.5) But i looked up some threads and i see people saying they have cleared it up with the treatment of this or that.
      Posted with my Android smartphone.

      Comment


      • #4
        Um, no. It does not need to "just run it's course." If you don't treat it, you very well could never get rid of it and you'll probably spread it to other animals or get it yourself.

        Fastest way to get rid of it is to use an appropriate anti-fungal. Get one from your vet or use something like this: http://www.kennelvet.com/topical-fun...b3fb576ea694eb

        Ringworm is not complicated, and I don't think it's that big of a deal. Just treat it and it will go away.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thats what i would think to, They lady whos horse Mine got it from had the vet out and did the skin scraping ect, and thats justn what he told her, to treat it but that no matter what t will have to run its course of how ever long.

          been looking it up and I just need to make sure i treat everything around the barn so t doesnt spread, Im just bummed b/c i have worked so had to have this beautiful golden coat on him, and the he gets something like this, and they way they lady made it sound with how fast it spread and how much hair he lost! I would truly freak out then. Anal i know.... but im hoping i caught it in time and will keep the spread to a min. I know his immune system is Not compramised in anyway, hes just young so he should ..I hope get over it quickly..

          I used the Nu stock today but I read on a here that the diluted bleach works well, the foot cream, and toothpast, oh and would kote,

          any of those anyone recommends over the next? if i could get a spray it would be great b/c i could ask my BM to spray him in the AM, and she wouldnt have to touh him. ( yes i know the wound kote it a spray) anything eles??
          Posted with my Android smartphone.

          Comment


          • #6
            Use an anti-fungal. Ringworm is a fungus. Don't screw around with stuff that won't kill a fungus.

            If you can't get an antifungal from the vet or your vet supply store, use athlete's foot spray. Athlete's foot is also a fungus.

            Ringworm is really not difficult. Treat with an appropriate anti-fungal and it should be gone in a week and you'll see hair regrowth shortly after.

            Comment


            • #7
              For goodness' sake, don't do all those things or you'll end up with a bald horse. Just get a fungicide from your vet and get it gone.

              Do they not just prescribe Fulvicin anymore?

              Your brushes, blankets, boots, saddle pads, even tack, you can rinse in a bleach solution--that'll take care of that. You could also wash down her stall with a bleach solution, too.

              It's not a big deal, but you do want to get rid of it and try not to catch it yourself.

              Comment


              • #8
                A run on a course of griseofulvin helps the process as well. Everything needs to be bleached that has touched the horse and kept seperate. No sharing anything! Call your vet and ask what he/she suggests. Will probably prescribe you medication without having to see the horse...

                Comment


                • #9
                  you need to have an iodine wash or iodine from a chemist human kind and or tack shop vets horse kind and a visit from the vet for an oral wormer for ringworm

                  you need to understand this his highly contagious to humans and animals

                  your yard should be in quaratine, with ext entry foot bath with jeyes disinfectant
                  and all your equipement rugs numnahs need disinfecting
                  and you need to wash clean all tack


                  and you need to wear rubber gloves
                  it cna transmit to you and other horses whilse this is on the ayrd the yard should be closed
                  and no movement in or out with horses going to shows etc

                  until the ringworm has gone

                  pics for you http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com...to-g36149.html


                  infomation-- http://www.liphookequinehosp.co.uk/llringworm.htm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My horse contracted it - it was a flipping nightmare! Finally the vet had me get a ring worm topical made for cattle - I applied it every three days and it cured it. He did sluff off his skin under his coat but his coat stayed in tact. The coat damage will take until spring to repair. I apply Eqquis coat spray to it daily - which helps it look better. It took until someone got ringworm from my horse for my vet to figure it out It will get the brand names for you later today.

                    PS I curried 7% iodine into him and burned the crappola out of his skin - CAUTION! And iodine baths did not touch it. I battled it FOUR MONTHS! Used the cattle stuff and viola` GONE!
                    "If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      12hooves: Desitin, or the generic version
                      I second the vote for Desitin, but I've had luck with both the cream and the spray.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A two-week regimen of Fulvicin powder cleared up my mare completely.

                        A bit pricey, but it's easy to administer, and it works.

                        Remember to use separate grooming tools, and disinfect them religiously.
                        The inherent vice of Capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings. The inherent virtue of Socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.
                        Winston Churchill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you just let it run its course, it will take about six weeks and you run the risk of secondary infections from the horse scratching itself - which will of course also spread the infection to the fenceposts or whatever the horse uses as a scratching post.

                          Fungicide. As said above, your vet can give you something or if you can't get a vet out use athlete's foot/jock itch stuff. But the stuff the vet prescribes will ultimately be cheaper. The little paint horse used to get ringworm every January when he was younger, so I know from experience.

                          If your horse people are like some around where I live, they will tell you to do all kinds of home remedies for things: bleach, Lysol, listerine, etc. (Interestingly, you will hear this list for just about any ailment from scratches to sweet itch.) Smile politely, nod, and ignore them completely. Otherwise you will wind up either a)not getting rid of the ringworm or b) causing chemical burns which stand a good chance of getting infected or c) both.

                          Dilute bleach solution (1/10) is good for disinfecting grooming tools but not for treating the horse itself. Listerine is just alcohol. Lysol is for floors. Sorry. I've repeated this litany to my neighbors so often it just comes out automatically anymore.
                          I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My young horse got ringworm on his face this spring, just before his very first in-hand show -- we didn't go, since I didn't want to spread it around, nor did he look too special with his splotchy face. I think picking one thing and sticking to it is the key. My vet recommended Lotramin antifungal and that really did the trick. It took maybe a week to start to see the raised parts of the ringworm disappearing, and at two weeks it was all pretty normal skin with hair starting to grow again. Because it was on his face, I wasn't tempted by all the harsh treatments I too read about. I also disinfected EVERYTHING -- his tack, his stall, brushes, fly mask, bucket/feeder, etc. We got a pump sprayer like for weed killer and loaded it up with bleach solution to spray down the overhang posts, fence, barn walls -- anything that he rubbed on.

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Originally posted by Woodland View Post
                              My horse contracted it - it was a flipping nightmare! Finally the vet had me get a ring worm topical made for cattle - I applied it every three days and it cured it. He did sluff off his skin under his coat but his coat stayed in tact. The coat damage will take until spring to repair. I apply Eqquis coat spray to it daily - which helps it look better. It took until someone got ringworm from my horse for my vet to figure it out It will get the brand names for you later today.

                              PS I curried 7% iodine into him and burned the crappola out of his skin - CAUTION! And iodine baths did not touch it. I battled it FOUR MONTHS! Used the cattle stuff and viola` GONE!
                              Yup thats what i did. I felt so bad, his whole girth area was completely swollen. he looked miserable. Called my vet today and really didnt give me much info, Just what i had already read, and to get a fungicide, well duh lol i was hopng on one that is known to be good and work the best lol
                              I got one called toad juice, we started carrying it a little while ago, and is supposed to work wonders, and with the betadine burning him, and this being all natural, i hope it will be soothing.
                              Posted with my Android smartphone.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Toad Juice? All natural blend of essential oils?

                                Go buy an anti-fungal. One that has been proven to be effective on fungus. Something that has Benzalkonium Chloride in it. Like this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/produc...&pf_id=0026112 or this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/produc...&pf_id=0031260

                                Seriously. You have every single person in this thread telling you the same thing, and you're totally ignoring the advice that's been given. Ringworm is not difficult to treat, but you actually have to treat it with an ANTI-FUNGAL.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Woodland View Post
                                  My horse contracted it - it was a flipping nightmare! Finally the vet had me get a ring worm topical made for cattle - I applied it every three days and it cured it. He did sluff off his skin under his coat but his coat stayed in tact. The coat damage will take until spring to repair. I apply Eqquis coat spray to it daily - which helps it look better. It took until someone got ringworm from my horse for my vet to figure it out It will get the brand names for you later today.

                                  PS I curried 7% iodine into him and burned the crappola out of his skin - CAUTION! And iodine baths did not touch it. I battled it FOUR MONTHS! Used the cattle stuff and viola` GONE!
                                  wrong type of iodine- if you useone from a chesmist which is human kind it doesnt do that
                                  and coms in a small bottle if you use a tack shop one or vet one, comes diluted
                                  as a wash -- there are two types of iodine
                                  make sure you thee correct one

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Simkie View Post
                                    Toad Juice? All natural blend of essential oils?

                                    Go buy an anti-fungal. One that has been proven to be effective on fungus. Something that has Benzalkonium Chloride in it. Like this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/produc...&pf_id=0026112 or this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/produc...&pf_id=0031260

                                    Seriously. You have every single person in this thread telling you the same thing, and you're totally ignoring the advice that's been given. Ringworm is not difficult to treat, but you actually have to treat it with an ANTI-FUNGAL.
                                    you can be sooo helpful, but yet so judgemental. I already called my vet and am using this b/c my horse had sucha bad reaction to something stronger, i wanted something to also soothe, AND yes this is an anti fungal, And yes i Know it has had to good results, thats why im trying it.

                                    http://www.toadjuice.net/

                                    there is the link of what i using, its also safe to use on tack, so thats also why i bought it, realy dont want to put a bleach solution on my saddle pads ect, I trust our reps, and all the feed back from customers, so thats why im using this ANTI FUNGAL.



                                    "Welcome to Coco's Equine Line, creators of Toad Juice(R), Toad Jelly(TM) and Toad Stick(TM). Coco's Equine Line started business in Sept 2005, just 2 short years ago and man, as my freind Robyne keeps saying "Who da thought?" I created Toad Juice after I had tried every other product on the market, on my horses Jade and Gayus. Each spring Jade "breaks out" on her face, belly and chest. I say breaks out because I don't think she has just one type of skin problem. Gayus has itchy, flaky, gooey skin ALL YEAR ROUND. Like I said, I had tried everything; natural, unnatural. Nothing worked and some of these products made MY HANDS BREAK OUT. Using my degree in Biology, I researched and experimented with 100's of different essential oils and different blends of oils, using only the safest and mildestbut MOST EFFECTIVE. I then experimented with different bases, finally deciding on a solution base I could use that would not leave an oily residue or interfere with other topical products. I have conducted experiments with Toad Juice on numerous strains of bacteria and fungus to check and verify Toad Juice efficacy. I created Toad Juice(R). I am truly amazed at how effective my products are for so many different applications on so many types of animals and skin problems! From Rain Rot to cuts and scrapes, yeast infections and mosquito bites, Toad Juice relieves the itching and scratching. Thank you for visiting our website.

                                    Please feel free to email or call (407) 718-1278 24/7 with any questions or comments. Like ALL good companies, we stand behind and guarantee our products. Toad Juice is a blend of essential oils and herbs. It is ALL NATURAL and NON-TOXIC, so it is kid safe. Toad Juice works on horses, dogs and cats. I have had customers use it on chickens, goats, cows, ducks AND even an iguana!!! Toad Juice works on: Rain Rot, Ringworm, Summer Itch, Sweet Itch, Grease, Mange, and Dermatitus caused by Flies, Fleas AND Mosquitoes. Toad Juice may be used on the face, avoiding the eyes and mucous membranes and entire body! Toad Juice will not interfere with other topical products, like fly spray, AND can be used as an antiseptic for minor cuts and scrapes. The essential oils in Toad Juice will help reduce skin inflammation, cool hot skin, relieve itching and scratching AND it is safe if your pet HAS to lick it off!"

                                    so yes i am listen to advice and appriciate it. I went out and gave him a bath with the chlorehexidine agian, and the let it dry and put on the "toad juice" b/c i wanted to soothe that hot skin, and then sprayed down all my saddles, bridles, pads ect. along with his stall, hes in private turnone right now, so away from the other horses. My vet said i could give this a try," any anti fungal.." and when i asked about this she said to try it, if i dont see improvment then im going to get the athletes foot cream but really dont want to irritate his skin any more than it already is.
                                    Posted with my Android smartphone.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      lysol it works

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Please, satisfy my curiosity. Why are you doing this? Why do you think essential oils will be more efficacious at curing a fungus than something the vet will prescribe? Is it price? Is it inaccessibility of a vet? Is it some idiosyncratic gripe you have against proven traditional medicine? I am flummoxed.

                                        Why do people believe in weird sh!t? Do you just think people go to vet school for years in order to scam people?
                                        I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

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