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Hot shoeing verses cold shoeing

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  • Hot shoeing verses cold shoeing

    I know I have started many threads but I am genuinely just trying to educate myself And hear others' experiences.

    Please tell me the pros and cons I'm hot shoeing and the pros and cons of shoeing cold shoeing.

    Thank you in advance!

  • #2
    There are only two ways to shoe a horse. Hot and wrong.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't know of any pro's to cold shoeing other than it's quicker.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm really interested now...what's so bad about cold shoeing?

        My farrier has been cold shoeing my horse since he's been back in regular shoes (was in straightbars per the vet for a while while healing suspensory lesions in the hind legs). Horse has continued to stay sound once the lesions healed *knocks on wood*...

        Originally posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
        There are only two ways to shoe a horse. Hot and wrong.
        Originally posted by RugBug
        Don't throw away opportunities because they aren't coming in exactly the form you want them to.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
          I don't know of any pro's to cold shoeing other than it's quicker.
          When cost is more important than precision, it's always quicker to just pull the shoe out of the box and nail it on.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dressage.For.Life. View Post
            I'm really interested now...what's so bad about cold shoeing?
            If you're working with aluminum keg shoes it is usually not a good idea to heat them for shaping. Aluminum keg shoes are heat treated during the manufacturing process in a controlled environment to make them harder. Once they are re-heated for forging the aluminum becomes considerably softer once it cools. You can quench the aluminum in water to re-harden it, but depending on the alloy and temperature at the moment the shoe is quenched it could make the aluminum extremely brittle - actually it can crumble like a cracker.

            The shoe manufacturers do not tell you what alloy they are using for their aluminum, so other than experimentation there is no way to know exactly how a given aluminum shoe will perform once it is heated. What's worse is that each manufacturer uses several different alloys. So each style of shoe from the same manufacturer could be different.

            Despite all that, I have occasionally been successful at heating aluminum keg shoes, forging them and having them hold up under a horse. I've also had to weld aluminum bar shoes. So it is doable, but not something I would want to do on a daily basis unless I was getting paid for the extra technical precision required to control the working temperatures. Unlike steel, you cannot tell what temperature hot aluminum is by the color. It melts before it turns red.

            My farrier has been cold shoeing my horse since he's been back in regular shoes (was in straightbars per the vet for a while while healing suspensory lesions in the hind legs). Horse has continued to stay sound once the lesions healed *knocks on wood*...
            So?

            Comment


            • #7
              Hot shoeing makes minute adjustments for fit possible that you can't do cold. It is the preferred method. Having said that, the above mentioned aluminum, which are pretty much standard issue on show hunters, are normally shaped cold. Because hey are softer, this can be done pretty well. There are also some horses that refuse to stand for hot fitting, and a good farrier has to work around that with cold.

              Cost shouldn't be the determining factor between the two methods. I also know some "quantity over quality" shoers who shoe cold just to get the job done quicker and on to the next horse. Not an option...
              Laurie

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not an expert, but I thought that one of the other benefits of hot shoeing was that it basically cauterizes and seals the hoof wall. Tom?

                One reason that I liked having my mare hot shod was that she has irregular shaped hooves and the fit was better when done hot. With cold shoeing, it seemed like sometimes she was being trimmed to fit the shoe rather than having the shoe modified to fit her but that could've been more a function of a bad farrier than the process itself.

                I'm just glad I don't have to worry about shoes anymore! Good luck on your research, OP.
                A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

                Might be a reason, never an excuse...

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Cost is not an issue for my horse. Heck I pay 200 every five weeks as it is but my concern is not the cost but that I think his toes are a tad long (not related to hot shoeing). Wanting to shoe him at the clinic to use radiographs to evaluate. My horse stands like a perfect gentlemen for vet and farrier except is afraid of the smoke. I am seriously considering trying cold shoe. Obviously if it does not work I go back to hot shoeing. I am also not expecting to save any money.

                  Will a thick leather pad reduce concussion forces and allow the foot the breath.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fharoah View Post
                    I know I have started many threads but I am genuinely just trying to educate myself And hear others' experiences.

                    Please tell me the pros and cons I'm hot shoeing and the pros and cons of shoeing cold shoeing.

                    Thank you in advance!
                    Yes, you do seem to start an awful lot of threads both here and elsewhere. Usually asking the same questions over and over but phrased slightly differently. Website owners must love your knack for keeping things active I suppose.

                    Originally posted by lauriep View Post
                    Hot shoeing makes minute adjustments for fit possible that you can't do cold. It is the preferred method. Having said that, the above mentioned aluminum, which are pretty much standard issue on show hunters, are normally shaped cold. Because hey are softer, this can be done pretty well. There are also some horses that refuse to stand for hot fitting, and a good farrier has to work around that with cold.
                    True enough. A good shoer can give you a good job regardless of the method employed. Aluminum can't be worked hot but some guys will burn a steel shoe onto the foot before nailing on the aluminum. The good end result is what you're looking for.


                    Originally posted by BuddyRoo View Post
                    I'm not an expert, but I thought that one of the other benefits of hot shoeing was that it basically cauterizes and seals the hoof wall. Tom?
                    I'm not Tom but yes that's true. Perhaps more importantly though is issues such as seedy toe, white line disease, candida yeast etc you'll never see in horses that are regularly hot shod.

                    Originally posted by Fharoah View Post
                    My horse stands like a perfect gentlemen for vet and farrier except is afraid of the smoke.
                    This can be dealt with through training. Burn pieces of hoof clipping and let horse smell them until he's no longer afraid. Some other horses have breathing issues, heaves, etc. On ones like that the smoke can really bother them so horses like that are best done cold.
                    Will a thick leather pad reduce concussion forces and allow the foot the breath.
                    No, it will do little or nothing for shock absorption. It will add length to the foot, reduce traction and increase the likelihood of losing a shoe. However, if the horse needs a pad for some reason leather is the best choice. It does allow air and moisture to pass through it unlike plastic.

                    Another thing people often overlook. Leather is nothing more than skin. In the tannery chemicals are applied to make the hide into leather and keep it from decomposing. These chemicals kill destructive bacteria. The benefit of this is those same leather treatments are effective against anaerobic bacterias in the horses hooves. This is another reason they are healthier and best choice if the horse needs pads for real for some reason.
                    For more fun talk and a chatroom too visit www.horseshoersforum.invisionzone.com
                    Stop in and say hello

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My new guy was afraid of the smoke when i first got him. Would back up a mile to get away. He had never been hot shod. I just started to grab a handful of treats before the hot shoe went on and feed the crap out of him. He was still apprehensive about it but he is such a grub he would stand to get the treats lol. Now he doesn't need the treats. He is use to it and doesn't mind it at all.
                      Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pro -Hot shoeing can get a slightly tighter fit between hoof and shoe.

                        Con - Horse can have a panic attack risking the safety of the farrier.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A good blowing fan will keep the smoke out of the horse's line of sight and nostrils. For mine it is the sizzle that worries them but the first time they were hot shod the farrier made sure the forgoing things were in place and he was patient and skilled.

                          From my farrier's point of view the biggest difference between hot and cold shoeing is the hot shoe is easier to shape.

                          Keeping it easier for the farrier is the name of the game.
                          from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Too much hype on the leather SOS. Wet leather indeed rots - chemicals or no.

                            JMO
                            from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hurleycane View Post
                              Too much hype on the leather SOS. Wet leather indeed rots - chemicals or no.

                              JMO
                              Not much hype, just superior to plastic. Pull off a shoe at the end of a shoeing cycle with each material and form your own opinion.

                              Absolutely it will rot but it'll hold up for a shoeing cycle and that's all it has to do
                              For more fun talk and a chatroom too visit www.horseshoersforum.invisionzone.com
                              Stop in and say hello

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                I am not too worried about thrush with leather pads as I have used them in past year round and with good farrier and good hoof packer and the hoof was perfectly healthy underneath.

                                My vet likes leather because it breathes.

                                My farrier likes leather but commented on it being more expensive.

                                My farrier uses both leather and plastic. I am just hoping to understand what is best for reducing concussion forces. Horse does not have sensitive feet they are black and hard and hold up well.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  There is nothing bad about cold shoeing IF it is done right
                                  There is nothing bad about hot shoeing If it is done right.
                                  I have seen as many bad hot shoeing jobs as great cold ones and visa versa.
                                  So it all depends on the needs of that horse, the needs of that hoof, that day.
                                  Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
                                  Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
                                  www.hoofcareonline.com

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Patty Stiller View Post
                                    There is nothing bad about cold shoeing IF it is done right
                                    There is nothing bad about hot shoeing If it is done right.
                                    I have seen as many bad hot shoeing jobs as great cold ones and visa versa.
                                    So it all depends on the needs of that horse, the needs of that hoof, that day.
                                    Are the situations where cold shoeing works for the horse better than hot shoeing?

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Hot shaping (forging the shoes) allows more custom modifications to the shoe for out of the ordinary situations.
                                      Hot seating correctly can harden and seal a weak hoof wall and edge of the sole on a weak or wet foot.
                                      Hot seating correctly can set in clips neater.
                                      Hot seating can be done wrong, harming the hoof.


                                      Cold can be done much quicker and with the HUNDREDS of different factory shoes including therapeutics available today, *nearly* any foot can be accommodated correctly without hot modifications. nearly. not all.

                                      Cold allows for the use of more alternative shoe materials including plastic, and aluminum (you may not want to heat aluminum shoes unless absolutely necessary for a lot of reasons)

                                      When well done, cold shoeing saves the owner money and IF DONE CORRECTLY makes no difference to the horse from well done hot with the exception of the need for special shoe modifications.

                                      Cold can be done wrong too, poorly shaped shoes set on unbalanced hooves and sloppy and cold should not be an excuse for poor work.
                                      Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
                                      Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
                                      www.hoofcareonline.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Are the situations where cold shoeing works for the horse better than hot shoeing?
                                        Sure. IME is generally a lot easier on the horse mentally to shoe cold if there is no special reason to have to do it hot.

                                        1) it is faster the horse doesn't have to stand there as long.
                                        2) there are so many GREAT shoes on the market today that that are better designed mechanically for the horse and are meant to be worked cold because they are made of made of materials you should not or can not heat ( aluminum, plastics)
                                        3)some horses just mentally freak at the smoke from hot seating so don't do it unless necessary. Why stress them?
                                        Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
                                        Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
                                        www.hoofcareonline.com

                                        Comment

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