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Mare cribs with wrong end; squishes ladyparts into trees

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  • Mare cribs with wrong end; squishes ladyparts into trees

    When not otherwise occupied, my 15-year-old TB/WB mare backs up against fenceposts, trees, the outside corner of her shed, the door jamb in her stall, etc, and just plants herself. She really jams the old vulva right up in there and then kind of shifts her weight from side to side. While jamming and shifting the hind end, she also bobs her head up and down and bites at the wall. It's almost like she's cribbing with her butt. It is quite the bizarre spectacle.

    I know what you're thinking, but the vet has ruled out a vadge infection. She's always been a bit bagged-up on one side, so I figured "there's the culprit!" but an infection there was also ruled out. I keep the teats, udder et al pretty spotless.

    She has given this performance many times daily for the 2 years I've had her. Her former owner, who had her for 6 months, confirmed that the mare consistently ass-cribbed at her barn, too. Before that she was stalled 24/7 at a H/J barn for her entire life. I'm wondering if this ass-cribbing is just a funky coping mechanism she developed to alleviate stress and ennui, or if something more sinister is afoot.

    So, has anyone ever seen this before? What ghastly obscure nastiness did it turn out to be? The mare's in good weight, good spirits, and does her job without complaint. But then again she's pretty stoic, too, so I've never really been able to shake the gnawing suspicion that something internal might be going on that the vet possibly missed with his cursory swab. Should I be pressing the DVM to be more aggressive with a DDX? I just wanna really rule out anything medical before just chalking it up to harmless eccentricity.
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life

  • #2
    Have you checked her for pinworms? Lay a good piece of tape against her anus and see what comes off.

    It could also have something to do with muscle or skeletal issues - sore muscle/spasm/knot, maybe bony alignment issue. Just throwing those out there.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

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    • #3
      Dewormed regularly? Have you checked her tail for ticks or scurf or other irritation?

      My mare rubbed her tail as one of the symptoms of EPM, but it was beyond obvious there were other neurologic signs as well and I certainly wouldn't think this behavior in isolation over months and years would be likely to suggest EPM.
      Click here before you buy.

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      • #4
        My mare has always been a bucket humper. I think it started out as taking the pressure off sore hocks years ago at the track and became a habit. She will just bump into the stall wall repeatedly if the bucket isn't handy.
        McDowell Racing Stables

        Home Away From Home

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        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thanks so much for the suggestions. She's on a regular deworming schedule and her tail is tick-free. It hadn't, however, occurred to me to think in terms of skeletal issues. It just so happens she has an OCD lesion in her stifle. She is asymptomatic -- no lameness or measurable discomfort. It seems unlikely to me that backing up to a tree would relieve hidden stifle pain, but then I'm no expert on biomechanics. And of course it could always be a skeletal thing unrelated to the OCD. Another notion to throw at the vet. Who, I forgot to mention, is coming out on Wednesday, if anyone was anxious that I am attempting to use the forum for free vet advice in lieu of real-life professional help. I'm trying to compile a list of questions to maximize my vet face-time. With a $90 farm-call surcharge, I like to be sure I don't overlook anything.
          Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life

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          • #6
            Off topic - but I love the way you write!

            Good luck with finding out why she does that. I guess its good that your fence is not lined with hot wire!
            http://jconnors1982.blogspot.com

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            • Original Poster

              #7
              @jconnors: What a nice compliment, thank you.

              As for unlocking the secret of my mare's feminine itch, I have a feeling this is gonna be one of those times the vet throws up his hands and utters the words no Crone in her right mind wants to hear: "Hell if I know; send her to the vet school."
              Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life

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              • #8
                My mare rubs her tail because of the arthritis in her neck. I suspect there's some sort of neuropathic pain or tingling thing going on.

                Some mares masturbate. That would be pretty high on my list of possibilities given your description of the issue.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ass-cribbing! LMAO! You owe me a new monitor, Mme Crone; this one is currently covered in soda.

                  Do horses get hemorrhoids or rectal polyps? Maybe its not the ladybits but her anus/rectum that's itchy and causing irritation?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I worked for a vet a few years ago we got called to check out a mini mare who would hump her oversize jolly ball. It was quite upsetting to the owners so we were there several times rulling out this and that. The 'diagnosis' was that she likes to hump her jolly ball for enjoyment, nothing wrong with her.

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                    • #11
                      A complete outside guess, but could she possibly have an ovarian cyst? I worked at a barn once years ago where a mare would turn around, bite herself on the flank, squeal, wink her vulva and throw off urine-- she was basically "teasing" herself. Turns out she had a cyst on one of her ovaries, and once it was removed, her hormones and attitude returned to normal. Just another idea to throw at your vet and see if the possibility "sticks". Good luck!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        O my goodness, this headline has me choking and spewing all over my desk....What a complete crack up. I'm sorry I have no answer for you but I am extremely amused by this thread..........;-)
                        Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Simkie View Post
                          Some mares masturbate. That would be pretty high on my list of possibilities given your description of the issue.
                          That's the money shot right there.

                          I have been waiting years to learn if mares have the big O. I even asked the vet prof if they were innervated the right way for that. The dude (a dude) didn't know.

                          If women were running things, we'd know if mares have a clitoris or some other basis for getting high off of actual sex.

                          So what does it look like when a mare masturbates other than the OP's wonderful description of a$$-cribbing?
                          The armchair saddler
                          Politically Pro-Cat

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                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            If women were running things, we'd know if mares have a clitoris or some other basis for getting high off of actual sex.
                            Well you can bet this is the first question the Intrepid Crone will be asking the (dudely) vet on Wednesday.
                            Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The Crone of Cottonmouth County View Post
                              Thanks so much for the suggestions. She's on a regular deworming schedule and her tail is tick-free. It hadn't, however, occurred to me to think in terms of skeletal issues. It just so happens she has an OCD lesion in her stifle. She is asymptomatic -- no lameness or measurable discomfort. It seems unlikely to me that backing up to a tree would relieve hidden stifle pain, but then I'm no expert on biomechanics. And of course it could always be a skeletal thing unrelated to the OCD. Another notion to throw at the vet. Who, I forgot to mention, is coming out on Wednesday, if anyone was anxious that I am attempting to use the forum for free vet advice in lieu of real-life professional help. I'm trying to compile a list of questions to maximize my vet face-time. With a $90 farm-call surcharge, I like to be sure I don't overlook anything.
                              how often - horses that are wormed constantly get used to it so it has no effect on the worms inside the body

                              horses that are wormed by seasons of the year and circle of the worms
                              are fully protected here in uk we do just that we dont daily

                              so get yourself on a proper worming programme and be advised that

                              your yard your in should treat all horses in the same manner so they are all wormed on the same day and kept in for 3 days over this worming period
                              the paddock should be cleaned daily so to prevent the contamiantion and the cycle of the lava of the worms and flys
                              the horses should be put into a fresh pasture that has been rested once they have completed the stay in period of the worming programme

                              the old pasture they have come from should be through cleaned and harrowed a and rested so that when the next worming due this pasture can be as the fresh pasture and so on


                              if one did this your mare wouldnt rub her bum so much and make herself sore or cause a nasty injury on rubbing on a potential object which could ripe her bum apart

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I can't believe I'm posting on this thread.

                                I was always under the impression that the "winking" you see is the protrusion of the clitoris.

                                As far as the big O... oddly enough in college (I was an animal science major my first year) I actually learned of a study where sheep were set up with electrodes and um... stimulated by the researchers... presumably with something artificial at least goodness I hope so... and they found that the ewes would have muscular contractions that would indicate the equivalent of the big O. My professor really enjoyed talking about animal sex so this was not the only study we heard about. This was all mid 80s if anyone is looking for a time frame for search purposes.

                                With that... signing out...

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  With one side more bagged up, it may be mild lymphatic clearance issues - hard to work up, but ask your doc. Mild swelling (think your own thickened ankles or hands after sleep) need a bit of massage to loosen up and feel better. The wall biting bit is odd though.

                                  Ask your doc about Regumate - perhaps if she is less hormonal, she will be less "tempted" ie stressed.

                                  Would be curious to know if this is ever diagnosed what it is.
                                  Horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
                                  ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by goeslikestink View Post
                                    how often - horses that are wormed constantly get used to it so it has no effect on the worms inside the body
                                    Not true.

                                    There are certain chemicals that have high resistance issues, and ones that still have next to no resistance issues. For the latter category, IF you deworm properly, you are not, in a few years, going to generate a resistant colony on a farm and certainly not in a horse.

                                    horses that are wormed by seasons of the year and circle of the worms
                                    are fully protected here in uk we do just that we dont daily
                                    You mean "cycle of the worms"?

                                    One doesn't have to not deworm daily to still do it properly

                                    so get yourself on a proper worming programme and be advised that
                                    You don't even know what deworming program she is on

                                    your yard your in should treat all horses in the same manner so they are all wormed on the same day and kept in for 3 days over this worming period
                                    the paddock should be cleaned daily so to prevent the contamiantion and the cycle of the lava of the worms and flys
                                    the horses should be put into a fresh pasture that has been rested once they have completed the stay in period of the worming programme
                                    Again, not true. You deworm horses based on individual needs and the season. If you have 1 horse out of 4 who is a high shedder because of low immune response issues, you don't treat ALL horses the same as the *one* who needs more frequent deworming - that goes right against the rule you've already preached.

                                    All horses should be dewormed at least once, preferably twice a year, and what you use, and exactly when you do it, depends on climate and area of the country.

                                    the old pasture they have come from should be through cleaned and harrowed a and rested so that when the next worming due this pasture can be as the fresh pasture and so on
                                    In the ideal world, which is not the one most of us live in

                                    if one did this your mare wouldnt rub her bum so much and make herself sore or cause a nasty injury on rubbing on a potential object which could ripe her bum apart
                                    You have absolutely on idea whether parasites are this mare's issue, so you cannot proclaim that doing all the right deworming things will fix this mare, especially since you don't know anything about her deworming schedule
                                    ______________________________
                                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Yes, mares have a clitoris and yes it is innervated.
                                      I love cats, I love every single cat....
                                      So anyway I am a cat lover
                                      And I love to run.

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                                      • #20
                                        http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...6tt0mR_zGBlpLQ

                                        http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...MfoO2zEu1YyXOQ

                                        and to be sure of what you r hrose actually has get a worm count dont and pooh test

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