• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

What would you eliminate/change first for horse w/too much energy

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What would you eliminate/change first for horse w/too much energy

    I posted before about having 'winter horse' i.e. is my horse going nuts or is it just the weather
    I've only had my horse one year and this is our first winter together. He's a 13 year old TB. In the past month he has gotten VERY forward at the canter and rushing fences. He had a huge spook the other day, and he rarely rarely spooks. That was the same day he took off with me in the arena. he is not the type to be worked down, rather, he gets 'worked up' as he's very very sensitive. It's not really the spookiness, I just feel like he wants to RUN. He's been like this for about a month.Some days we can't even jump, he's just too pumped.

    To put some weight on him about 4 months ago i added a flake of alfalfa to his all grass hay feedings. About a month after that I began feeding him Triple Crown senior, but only the lowest amount recommended. He also gets some veggie oil for his coat. He looks fantastic now, vet says he is at the perfect weight and condition.

    So - what do we do? Do we eliminate the alfalfa and go back to all grass? The TC Senior? Add magnesium or a calming supplement? Everyone has different opinions at my barn (of course). My vet doesn't think alfalfa is all that bad and likes him on it, his last trainer said NO alfalfa for this horse, and a friend of mine said, "are you crazy?? TC senior is loaded with sugar! Duh! GEt the TC lite." Well, I never thought it made horses hot and it's been about 4 months...

    Could a magnesium supplement be used for the winter?

    Just confused and want my calm boy back and want to be able to jump a course w/out him hitting the gas so hard I don't like being a timid rider and i'm not having fun.

  • #2
    You listed a bunch of possible solutions. The best thing to do is try them individually, one by one. Personally, I would start by eliminating the alfalfa and see what happens. I have a mare that I put on it to gain a little weight and get the extra calcium, and she was nearly unrideable on it. I had noticed she was a lot more "up", but didn't even connect the two.

    That's an easy one to try and eliminate as a possible option reason quickly. Is the past month the coldest month you've had? The issues have just developed recently, right?
    http://ridingthroughthefear.blogspot.com/
    www.facebook.com/ThaliaFarm

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Whistler View Post
      and a friend of mine said, "are you crazy?? TC senior is loaded with sugar! Duh! GEt the TC lite."
      TC Senior is not loaded with sugar, its NSC level is quite low at 11-something%. It looks like it has sugar because it has that dark brown texture that sweet feed has, so it looks like its covered in molasses, but its really oil to add fat.
      "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with eliminating one thing at a time to ensure you're really getting a clear picture of what changes.

        I would start by eliminating the alfalfa. Give him a month and see how he responds. Since his last trainer would presumably know him well, she may know that he cannot do alfalfa.

        If he is still exciteable, do not reintroduce alfalfa, but take away the TC Senior. If he still does not resume to his normal self, have a vet check him out. Could be pain from somethign else (ulcers, etc.)
        "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Cool. I did not think TC senior contained much sugar at all but my friend was convinced that molasses was what 'made it all stick together' - LOL

          Anyway, I think i will go the route of eliminating alfalfa first. Previous trainer was on to something I guess, although i took it with a grain of salt because some of her other ideas didn't make a lot of sense.

          Thanks baby eventer and suckerforhorses!

          Comment


          • #6
            I didnt read all the post, but a life time of thbds, the best way that I have put weight on.. and keep engery low, Timothy hay(OG has too much sugar) soaked tim/alf pellets, a full bucket a day( 3 dry scoops and soak until fluffy), I love cool calories and for a sensitive mare, smart pak calm pellets. And a balance vitamin.
            Gates Equestrian
            National Champion Dan Patch sire of USEF/USHJA winning ponies!
            [url]www.gateseqsmfponies.webs.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
              TC Senior is not loaded with sugar, its NSC level is quite low at 11-something%. It looks like it has sugar because it has that dark brown texture that sweet feed has, so it looks like its covered in molasses, but its really oil to add fat.

              This is correct . So many people refer to TC Senior and TC Complete as "sweet feeds" and its just inaccurate.

              I am with those that say eliminate the alfalfa first. I have known a handful of horses that have been sensitive to it.

              Comment


              • #8
                He could just need more turnout, assuming that's a possibilty. Horses are cold-weather animals, and as such, are usually more "up" in cooler temperatures.

                Otherwise, you've been given some good suggestions.
                If we have to nail on talent, it's not talent.
                Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pattnic View Post
                  He could just need more turnout, assuming that's a possibilty. Horses are cold-weather animals, and as such, are usually more "up" in cooler temperatures.

                  Otherwise, you've been given some good suggestions.
                  I agree with more turnout also, as much as possible. They have energy to expend, and if they can't do it in turnout, you're going to be dealing with it under saddle
                  "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have always been one to uphold that no particular feed could make a horse hot, GENERALLY SPEAKING and that it was the calories and not the type of food. But one of mine does seem to freak out with alfalfa.

                    Remember that this time of year is mud and ice season, so even horses that are turned out do a LOT of standing around because the ground really is not conducive to playing or just wandering freely. Even the active TB I have living here this winter, who is a man in motion most of the time, spends a LOT of time just standing when the ground is awful. He's a smart guy.

                    The thing that struck me was a former trainer saying not to use alfalfa--maybe that advice is worth heeding. I'd personally start with that. There are PLENTY of ways to get calories into a horse without alfalfa, although again I don't think it's a universally bad thing.

                    And finally, my old event mare would turn into a fire-breathing dragon EVERY spring, and it wasn't until the first couple of jump schools were done and over with (I had to warn everyone not to watch, I actually LOVED her ferociousness and she NEVER made a mistake but was . . . forward) she was a nut. Then she'd settle down to business.
                    Click here before you buy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Even my very calm WB mare has been "up" recently due mostly to the weather. But I would certainly get rid of the alfalfa. Try Denji if you need to put on calories, or beet pulp. Certain feeds do in fact have different effect on some horses.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree on ditching the alfalfa. I tried it once for about a week with my TB and he was a total nut that whole week. Took him off it, back to normal. Same thing with LMF Senior, when he was on it he was insane, on to TC Lite, back to normal. You can try other things before a calming supplement. To add more calories I really like beet pulp, flax seed, and/or rice bran.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LookinSouth View Post
                          This is correct . So many people refer to TC Senior and TC Complete as "sweet feeds" and its just inaccurate.
                          Here's the first three ingredients in TC Complete:

                          Shredded Beet Pulp, Cane Molasses, Whole Oats,...
                          With molasses in 2nd place and oats at 3rd, this is darn close to being a sweet feed.

                          Apparently, not many here actually read feed bag labels.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rcloisonne View Post
                            Here's the first three ingredients in TC Complete:


                            With molasses in 2nd place and oats at 3rd, this is darn close to being a sweet feed.

                            Apparently, not many here actually read feed bag labels.
                            http://www.triplecrownfeed.com/artic...rown-horsefood
                            And here you see the NSC values of Triple Crown Senior, which are lower than Nutrena SafeChoice
                            "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree that the TC Complete is not a good choice, high NSC value. TC Senior though...that gets my vote.
                              "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I am actually pulling my arab off of Horseman's Edge since he has become the fire breathing dragon since about mid January.
                                This is my third winter for this horse and he was not this way the last two winters.
                                I changed his feed from 1.5 scoops of sweet feed to 1 scoop sweet and 1 scoop Horseman's Edge. He needed a little more weight. I was trying to do the right thing and not give him too much sweet feed.
                                Finnegan has already been on a daily calming supplement for about a year. (Smart Calm).
                                The sweet feed this barn feeds is actually very dry- it could almost be called COB.
                                For Finnegan I do not think he can tolerate the Horseman's Edge. Not sure if it is the sugar or another ingredient but it is the only real change that may have caused the change in his behavior.
                                Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by SonnysMom View Post
                                  I was trying to do the right thing and not give him too much sweet feed.
                                  Do the best thing for him, and don't give him any sweet feed

                                  There are so many other feed items to put weight on and provide calories.
                                  "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    What condition was your tb in before you got him? How much turnout does he get and how often is he worked? I'm just wondering if his behaviour is a result of feeling better, ie fit and at a good weight.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      With molasses in 2nd place and oats at 3rd, this is darn close to being a sweet feed.

                                      Apparently, not many here actually read feed bag labels.
                                      Well, if ingredient #1 is 75% of the product and ingredients #2 and #3 are fractions but higher than #s 4 and 5, that would give you an identical label as a product where ingredient #1 is 10% of the product, ingredient #2 is 9% and ingredient #3 is 8%. You do have to dig a little farther, indeed. And do some math.
                                      Click here before you buy.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by rcloisonne View Post
                                        Apparently, not many here actually read feed bag labels.

                                        Um, I can assure you I DO read feed bag labels . I just don't make assumptions about a particular feed based solely on the first three ingredients


                                        To be clear, I never said I recommended TCC for the horse in question on this thread. I was simply in agreement with another poster that alot of people misunderstand TCC and TC Senior as "sweet" feeds which they are NOT. They are both BP based feeds and classified as such. TCC has the addition of some oats, hence the higher NSC%.
                                        Call TC and ask them yourself if you don't want to take my word for it.

                                        A sweet feed is more along the lines of Blue Seal Charger, Pacer or Rider. Or TC 14% Performance. These are not beet pulp based feeds and they are largely recognized as "sweet" feeds because they consist of corn, oats and molasses and the fiber content of sweet feeds usually is much lower than BP based feeds.

                                        That said, despite the 20% NSC TCC is a great feed for many horses, mine included.

                                        Lets do some comparison since some on this board seem to think the addition of some oats and molasses to a BP based feed means "sweet" and "high in sugar".

                                        NSC%

                                        TC Senior: 11.7%
                                        TC Complete: 20.6%
                                        BS Hunter: 33%
                                        BS Sport: 40%
                                        Nutrena Safe Choice: 22.8%
                                        BS Charger Sweet: 39%
                                        BS Pacer Sweet: 48%
                                        BS Vintage Senior: 20%
                                        Nutrena LiteBalance: 17%
                                        Strategy: 28%


                                        As you can see here TCC still has a lower NSC% than Safechoice which is actually marketed as a "controlled starch grain" and a significantly lower NSC% than many other grains on the market including pelleted grains that are not considered "sweet" feeds.
                                        Last edited by LookinSouth; Feb. 22, 2012, 07:44 PM.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X