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Feeding oil and the best method for cleaning feed buckets/pans/etc

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  • Feeding oil and the best method for cleaning feed buckets/pans/etc

    I have been feeding canola oil to my horses for years but have never quite figured out how to clean feed pans or buckets afterwards. I was wondering if anyone has a good method for feeding the grain with oil or cleaning the buckets? Even with good ol' Dawn I cannot get it clean.

    I have figured out that for me it is best to feed grain with oil on it in black rubber feed pans on the ground. I would love to feed it in buckets since some of my horses like to dump their pans (either by pawing at it or nosing it over) but I have found that nothing really cleans the layer of oil out of buckets and if neglected too long, a disgusting layer forms that I cannot get off. Also, one of my horses had a dermatitis on his nose and his chin from where the oil on the buckets was contacting him (easily solved by stopping use of the bucket and using a pan) and I am afraid of that happening again.

  • #2
    I fill mine up with water and let them soak in the sun for a few hours before scrubbing. It has worked rather well for me.

    I do have to say I have a phobia of my rubber tubs after seeing a show on RFD-TV about a big ball removed from a horse's intestine that was the result of his rubber tub wearing thin and him injesting the materials! As soon as mine start wearing thin they get repurposed for my husband to use to drain tractor oil, etc....

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't you love that horrid black tarry mess? We used to pressure wash the barn walls and feeders regularly to get the oil crud off. I tried the feeders that fit into car tires to stop the pawers from spilling their food. Fine, until my mare got her pastern caught between the feeder and the tire and was dragging it around (quite calmly) like a huge black rubber bracelet. I have to second the soaking in the sun suggestion, and Dawn does help cut the grease.

      Comment


      • #4
        Fortiflex makes a hard plastic feed tub that has a double
        wall making it very hard to overturn the feed tubs. The
        Fortiflex tubs are similar in appearance to a 3 gallon rubber
        feed tub except the sidewall is shaped like /\___/\ in profile.
        These will crack if tossed hard or stepped on, but they are
        not terribly expensive to replace and will not absorb any
        oily food so easy to clean.
        Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
        Elmwood, Wisconsin

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been feeding several oz per day per head of cocosoya daily for several years now, and for reasons I cannot fathom I have not had any problems with oil buildup or grunge or black tar at all. Everyone I know hates feeding oil, they say its such a mess, but I just haven't experienced that. Perhaps its because I don't feed grain, but a mix of alfalfa cubes, oats, flax and pelleted & ground supplements, or maybe its some special property of cocosoya.

          What I do every day after dumping the soaked feed is dunk the bucket in the water tub to rinse it out completely (I change the water too after) and then leave it upside down on a fence post to dry completely before setting it out for the next meal.

          I did NOT like the rubber feed pans for oily food, I found them to be the worst at building a layer of oily grime (and the horses tip the pans). I feed my horses out of these buckets http://www.smartpakequine.com/the-be...x?cm_vc=Search

          which in a years time look brand new and clean day in and day out and have required virtually zero cleaning.
          Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

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          • #6
            This an easy fix....borrow my dog and she'll lick those pans super duper clean. When she is done then she'll sneak over and tidy up that little mess around the cat dish. She also patrols the floors in the house.....no tidbit to small to escape her interest.

            Arm and Hammer Washing Soda is a pretty good degreaser. And cheap too.

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            • #7
              Maybe its worthwhile to change to the cocosoya pelleted form from smartpak?

              Comment


              • #8
                I think the best way is to keep it from touching the tub in the first place. I've had good luck with this method:

                I fill a gallon container with alfalfa pellets and a little (2 cups?) senior feed (the Senior Feed brand I buy from Costco has molasses, so I use hardly any because I don't want the sugar -- but the horses love it!). Then I pour the oil over this and add some (a cup or so?) hot water last so that the oil rises back up through the feed. I put the lid on it and turn it over a few times to mix it and then I take it to the paddock and pour it onto a leafy flake of alfalfa in the feed tub.

                By the time I get to the horses, it has absorbed the water and has the consistency of oatmeal. The alfalfa soaks up any moisture and residue, and the horse eats the gloppy stuff first because it's tasty, which works out well because by the time she gets to the alfalfa flake, there's no more mess. When I started this process I was worried about exactly your problem and was very pleased with how well it worked out. I should add that I was only feeding 1-1/2 cups of oil, which may be less than what you are feeding.


                There is one problem: the messy, oily container which I have to take back home each day. No matter how careful I am, when I pour out the contents I always get some oil on the outside, often from the lid dripping, so I always bring a plastic bag. I've thought of skipping the container and just using plastic bags or zip-loc bags, but I think it would be a waste and expensive, unless I reused them, in which case it's easier to wash a container than a baggie. And I need to mix it at home because I want the to oil to stay cool and fresh in my house (it would go rancid in the heat outside). In any case, washing a gallon container is much easier than cleaning a 40 gallon feed tub.
                "Random capitAlization really Makes my day." -- AndNirina

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Merle View Post
                  I have been feeding canola oil to my horses for years but have never quite figured out how to clean feed pans or buckets afterwards. I was wondering if anyone has a good method for feeding the grain with oil or cleaning the buckets? Even with good ol' Dawn I cannot get it clean.
                  I've been feeding oil for years in hard plastic buckets (think empty Horse Guard Vit. buckets) and never scrubbed them with soap.

                  First, I put the oil in last, so it's on the top. Plus , I do feed BP pellets, but I only soak them for 15-20 mins or so (in hot tap water).

                  I put all my grains/BP (still dry at this point) and then add water. Once it's "plumbed up" abit, I add the oil and stir...feed within 20 mins.

                  Then I immediately rinse out the buckets with water from the outdoor faucet and set them upside down to dry.

                  Sometimes the dogs lick them before I wash (the love the oil too!) and that's great "pre-wash".

                  But I wouldn't use soap or bleach or any of that stuff because of the risk of it soaking into the plastic and effect the taste (to the horse) of the grain.

                  I think you will find that the black rubber buckets are MUCH harder to clean...switch to hard plastic buckets and you will find there will be far less clean-up.

                  PS for my "tossers" I feed in actual Rubbermaid or galvanized hay feeders, so they can't nose it out.

                  Works great and stays clean.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Wow, thanks for all of the replies. Sounds like washing them out with water afterwards is the way to go. The only issue for me is that it is freezing cold outside in upstate NY right now. I just tried rinsing off my mare's poop covered Rambo tail cord in some water and whew, my fingers were feeling it.

                    My horses who get oil typically get 1 cup of oil on their grain (usually 2 quarts of grain). It is a lot of oil so perhaps that is the not helping the cleanliness (my horses look great and have no issues with eating that much oil).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Assuming your horse has heated water trough, after dumping feed take the bucket to the trough and quickly carefully scoop a half bucket full of water. If you do it quickly and in one smooth motion you won't backwash any of the feed residue back into the tank. Then swirl around the water in the bucket so the water sloshes up the sides and gets all the bits, and then fling the water out. Hang the bucket on a fence post upside down so all the water runs out, leave it for at least 20 min until good and dry and it should be fairly clean.

                      You never have to actually get your hands wet

                      I find if I rinse my buckets clean after every use I only have to really wash them with baking soda or dawn a few times a year.
                      Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by buck22 View Post
                        Assuming your horse has heated water trough, after dumping feed take the bucket to the trough and quickly carefully scoop a half bucket full of water. If you do it quickly and in one smooth motion you won't backwash any of the feed residue back into the tank. Then swirl around the water in the bucket so the water sloshes up the sides and gets all the bits, and then fling the water out. Hang the bucket on a fence post upside down so all the water runs out, leave it for at least 20 min until good and dry and it should be fairly clean.

                        You never have to actually get your hands wet

                        I find if I rinse my buckets clean after every use I only have to really wash them with baking soda or dawn a few times a year.
                        Hm, maybe I could do this! Yes, they have heated troughs. They are the muck bucket type ones so not giant and I might spill some water but hey, I'd probably get the hang of it sooner or later. Good idea! Thanks!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PeteyPie View Post
                          (2 cups?) senior feed (the Senior Feed brand I buy from Costco has molasses, so I use hardly any because I don't want the sugar -- but the horses love it!).
                          Costco has horse feed? Just looked on-line & they do not list any. Where is your Costco?
                          "Police officers are public servants. Not James Bond with a license to kill."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ThisTooShallPass:

                            My Costco is in California. I've noticed that all the Costco stores have different merchandize geared toward their local markets. The town of Norco, right next to this store, has a large population of horses/horse owners. Anyway, they sell a brand of senior feed, I think it is called Arizona Equine Senior feed or something like that.
                            "Random capitAlization really Makes my day." -- AndNirina

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I checked the feed bags and I erred. The feed from Costco, the Arizona brand, is not senior feed, but regular pellets. The senior feed I have is from the feed store.
                              "Random capitAlization really Makes my day." -- AndNirina

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