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something to kill adult Onchocerca? 19 CASE STUDIES POSTED-PAGE 58

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  • something to kill adult Onchocerca? 19 CASE STUDIES POSTED-PAGE 58

    I have been struggling with "sweet itch " this year and in my research to help relieve my poor filly's misery, I have run across that Onchocerca microfilaria may be a significant part of the problem. Apparently ivermectin will kill the microfilaria larvae, but not kill the adults. Is there anything which will kill the adults?

    Thanks
    Tammy

  • #2
    Double dose with Equimax. Wait two weeks and double dose again.

    I've seen it work many, many times.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

    Comment


    • #3
      chocomare, is it the ivermectin or the praziquantel, or both, that you're after? I didn't realize praziquantel was for anything but tapes.
      ______________________________
      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

      Comment


      • #4
        I didn't realize praziquantel could be double-dosed!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JB View Post
          chocomare, is it the ivermectin or the praziquantel, or both, that you're after? I didn't realize praziquantel was for anything but tapes.
          In all honesty, I'm not sure. I was instructed to do this with my late app who was struggling with rain rot. Since her previous "care" was extremely lax, the Neck Threadworms were brought into the picture. I had done everything to treat it, both externally and internally (with feed) but it wouldn't go. NOW THAT MY FARRIER HAS "OUTTED" HERSELF, I'LL CHANGE THIS PART TO GIVE HER THE REAL CREDIT.... My Farrier told me to do the double dose Equimax thing. Voila'...gone.

          Next example was a mare in my barn with "spring allergies"/sweet itch. Allll over her neck, chest and belly every spring. She'd scratch till she bled. Horrible. She'd done all the antihistamines, steroids, baths, goops, sprays, etc. but it never cleared. Farrier told her the "double dose Equimax" thing. Shazam, it cleared and has never come back.

          My farrier has also happened to be doing the hooves for a gelding owned by one of my church friends. He casually says "Geez, sure wish I could get this skin crud cleared up on ole Red. I've tried everything and it won't go away." She says "Well, my personal research has shown me that double dosing with Equimax kills the NTWs, so try it." He does, skin crud goes away.

          Of course, this is no scientific, double blind study...only anecdotal per se. But I've seen it and, more important, she's seen it FOR YEARS. None of the above people did anything other than the Equimax double dose thing.
          Last edited by ChocoMare; Aug. 29, 2008, 07:04 AM.
          <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Simkie View Post
            I didn't realize praziquantel could be double-dosed!
            ivermectin and praziquantel have a pretty high safety rate, so yes, it *can* be double dosed. I have never heard of any reason to do so though (as opposed to the doubling of the fenbendazole in a power pack).

            Originally posted by ChocoMare View Post
            In all honesty, I'm not sure. I was instructed to do this with my late app who was struggling with rain rot. Since her previous "care" was extremely lax, the Neck Threadworms were brought into the picture. I had done everything to treat it, both externally and internally (with feed) but it wouldn't go. Vet told me to do the double dose Equimax thing. Voila'...gone.
            If you run into wanting/needing to do this again, can you try it with just a double dose of ivermectin?
            ______________________________
            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

            Comment


            • #7
              I routinely use a double dose of Ivermectin. None of my horses have any of those issues so perhaps there is some validity to it being the Ivermectin. I have never used the double dose of Equimax but would not hesitate to do so if I got a horse w/the notorious "sweet itch". I have a friend who did it w/a horse who apparently had bad allergies and a crest that would not reduce... he is fine now. Hmmmmmm. Thanks ChocoMare, it was your advice that prompted her to do it!
              "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
              ---
              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

              Comment


              • #8
                EQT: Oh this is good to hear. I'm so honored to be of humble assistance.

                The more I learn about those nasty Neck Threadworms and their microfilia, the more I wonder how much damage those suckers do without us knowing it's them.

                I read something about a year ago wherein a study is being conducted to see if there is a connection between NTW's and contracted tendons in foals, as well as other joint and tissue issues. From a layperson's stand point, it makes sense to me since NTW's take up residence in soft tissue and joints, not the gut.

                Also read that the presence of NTW's is spreading farther and faster than originally believed. Alas, here in the Southeast (aka Parasite Heaven), they are running rampant yet many folks are just not aware of damage they can do.
                <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well.. as you know I am a huge fan of deworming horse people really need to get their minds around the fact that worms take up residence in all sorts of places in horses bodies.. and may be responsible for all sorts of things OTHER than just the horse being thin.
                  "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                  ---
                  The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    EqTrainer

                    I've been following your worming schedule since November of last year and we've had minimal 'sweet itch' issues this year (only one week in May and none since I double dosed with anthelcide). But what I really want to ask is WHY are we double dosing the wormers? I mentioned your program to someone but I didn't have a good answer when she asked me why the double dose.
                    http://www.eponashoe.com/
                    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a 2-yo gelding who has had insect allergy issues since he was a yearling. When I bought him, he had no hair on his neck or shoulders. This year he is not quite as bad, though he does still have welts and is itchy, despite insect repellant, baths, etc.

                      I am really curious to learn more about the neck thread worms thing. I have not tried double dosing him with ivermectin. He has been wormed monthly since I bought him 8 months ago, and PowerPacked, but never double ivermectin.

                      Are there any good articles that discuss neck threadworms?

                      Edited to add, I just double-dosed Anthelcide yesterday, if that helps?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So, you give two doses (tubes, basically) of Equimax, wait two weeks, and give two doses again? Just want to make sure I got this right -- seems like quad dosing
                        "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          No, not the full tubes. Eek!

                          Double dose for your horse based on weight.
                          <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by marta View Post
                            I've been following your worming schedule since November of last year and we've had minimal 'sweet itch' issues this year (only one week in May and none since I double dosed with anthelcide). But what I really want to ask is WHY are we double dosing the wormers? I mentioned your program to someone but I didn't have a good answer when she asked me why the double dose.

                            EqTrainer - Would you be willing to PM me the worming schedule you use?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hey Marta - we do all the ivermectins and strongids in double for two reasons - the first one is that most of our horses are BIG, and over the weight amount for one tube. The second is wastage - how much does not actually get inside the stomach!

                              I guess there really is one more reason - and that is our suspicion that most horses are or have been underdewormed. Remember most of my horses are rehabs!

                              Glad it has been working for you... we find that all horses become relatively easy keepers with time, we have zero incidence of colic (knock on wood) and interestingly enough, no ulcers either. I really cannot say it's all about the deworming but I'm willing to run with it anyway
                              "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                              ---
                              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Hampton Bay View Post
                                I have a 2-yo gelding who has had insect allergy issues since he was a yearling. When I bought him, he had no hair on his neck or shoulders. This year he is not quite as bad, though he does still have welts and is itchy, despite insect repellant, baths, etc.

                                I am really curious to learn more about the neck thread worms thing. I have not tried double dosing him with ivermectin. He has been wormed monthly since I bought him 8 months ago, and PowerPacked, but never double ivermectin.

                                Are there any good articles that discuss neck threadworms?

                                Edited to add, I just double-dosed Anthelcide yesterday, if that helps?
                                Here's some info:

                                http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/in...m/bc/71804.htm

                                Re: Anthelcide.... actually it's ivermectin and moxidectin that kill the critters.
                                <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Shazam...I think I found out why Equimax was recommended. Granted this is from Australia, but since we know that NTWs are rampant here, it applies:

                                  http://www.brunswickvet.com.au/Templ...=1291&specie=6

                                  Adult females worms up to 30cm long live in the major ligaments of the neck and, in rare cases, the flexor tendons and suspensory ligaments of the fetlock. Tiny juvenile forms (microfilariae) are produced by the female worms, and these migrate out of the ligaments towards the skin surface to form small, itchy lumps under the skin.

                                  The horse rubs and abrades the lumps, which may seep serum. Biting insects, particularly sand flies, and possibly mosquitoes, are attracted by the abraded lump and digest microfilariae as they feed. These insects are capable of spreading the infestation to other horses within 20 – 25 days after ingesting microfilariae.

                                  The lifecycle is complete in approximately 4 – 5 months. The adult worms have no recognised detrimental effect on the neck ligaments, however occasionally they may cause swelling of the flexor tendons and lameness in the front limbs.

                                  The larvae can also invade the eye and cause blindness, particularly if the horse rubs and lacerates the eye.

                                  Signs of Onchocerciasis
                                  - Small lumps, from pea to marble size, develop in the skin on the underside of the belly, chest, withers, neck and face
                                  - Itching and rubbing causes thinning and loss of hair, and scaly skin, particularly along the mane
                                  - Surrounding weepy and scabby areas develop in severe cases
                                  - Often white tufts of hair regrow on healing
                                  - Biopsy of the lumps by your vet to identify microfilariae can confirm the diagnosis of onchocerciasis

                                  Treatment & control of Onchocerciasis
                                  - Control of biting insects is essential to prevent the condition
                                  - Stable and rug the horse day and night
                                  - Install insect screens in stables during summer months
                                  - Control of the microfilariae that cause skin itching can be achieved by worming with Equimax, Equiminth, Equimec, or Equest
                                  - After treatment, horses often become intensely itchy within 24 – 72 hours, causing severe skin abrasions and mutilations, and damaging feeders, walls and fences on which they rub
                                  - The itch may be controlled by prednisilone granules added to the feed for 3 – 5 days (consult your vet for advice).
                                  <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Hampton Bay View Post
                                    Edited to add, I just double-dosed Anthelcide yesterday, if that helps?
                                    Anthelcide - oxibendazole - certainly has it's place. It's really only effective for anything at a 1.5x dose, so a 2x dose is a bit of added insurance for wastage
                                    ______________________________
                                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by ChocoMare View Post
                                      No, not the full tubes. Eek!

                                      Double dose for your horse based on weight.
                                      Yes, a tube is about what my horse takes
                                      "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Hey Chocomare - the Aussies have some really interesting deworming info, don't they?!!!
                                        "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                                        ---
                                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                                        Comment

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