• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Getting a weanling to eat

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Getting a weanling to eat

    My neighbor took in an 8 month old colt on Christmas Eve.
    The colt was bought by a kind soul at an auction and put out with her horses. Colt would not eat her grain and it seems like her hay might not be best quality. She gave the colt to my neighbor.

    This colt is very thin, prominent backbone, rather small for his age. He seems very lethargic although is not laying down excessively. Eats the nice hay my neighbor is offering but will not take any of the feed she has tried. She has offered senior feed, mare and foal, grain with molasses, carrots, apples. She can get him to take one bite, but he won't take a second one.

    Any suggestions on what to do besides keep hay available?
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin

  • #2
    I would have the vet out. Ulcers, worms and dental are likely candidates. Maybe all three at once
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, I would get the vet out asap!! It could be lots of things bothering him and you don't want him to go down hill more than he already is.
      RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
      May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
      RIP San Lena Peppy
      May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010

      Comment


      • #4
        Deworm, very carefully.

        My weanling had a belly full of worms when I got her, I knew it since i had a fecal done, I gave her a very small dose (1/3 dose by weight) of a mild dewomer and she still had colic.

        The grain might be more rich then he is used to, maybe try some alfalfa pellets at first, or beet pulp. I also found Triple Crown Growth to be very palatable for my picky baby.
        for more Joy then you can handle
        http://dangerbunny.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Absolutely time for the vet! I would bet ulcers. In the meantime I would see if you can get him to drink warm milk replacer. Foals in the wild sometimes aren't weaned until 12-18 months, and if this guy is small for his age and having such a hard time, I'd get nutrition in him, however you could do it. I would also try the foal milk pellets and see if he will eat those. But I would bet my next paycheck that if she does Gastrogard for a few days, he will be eating anything put in front of him.

          Been there - done that.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dangerbunny View Post
            I gave her a very small dose (1/3 dose by weight) of a mild dewomer and she still had colic.
            Please please never do this Never give partial doses of dewormers. That is one reason why we have resistance issues. This is no different than antibiotics - you never give partial doses.

            The best you can do is use a dewormer that has a high resistance (ie fenbendazole and pyrantel pamoate, aka Safeguard or Panacur, and Strongid paste, respectively), so you don't kill too many of too many parasites at once, and even then, yes, if they are loaded, you can still have problems and it's best to have a vet on standby in those cases.

            You didn't kill 1/3 of the worms. You killed the very weakest, and left the stronger ones exposed but not killed, making it likely they will produce a new generation that is more resistant.
            ______________________________
            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

            Comment


            • #7
              I third having the vet out asap. He may have never been fed grain and doesn't quite know what it is. Keep him on quality hay 24/7 until the vet sees him.

              Comment


              • #8
                Normally I agree completely, I was advised to do so by my vet since the filly had such a huge count. I used pyrantel pamoate for the first dose, then followed it up a week later with a normal dose of fenbendazole and ivermectrin a couple weeks after that. Just to be clear I wasn't recommending using partial doses just sharing the colic experience, it was scary and she passed worms for days.
                for more Joy then you can handle
                http://dangerbunny.blogspot.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dangerbunny View Post
                  Normally I agree completely, I was advised to do so by my vet since the filly had such a huge count. I used pyrantel pamoate for the first dose, then followed it up a week later with a normal dose of fenbendazole and ivermectrin a couple weeks after that. Just to be clear I wasn't recommending using partial doses just sharing the colic experience, it was scary and she passed worms for days.
                  Don't worry. Every time I suggest giving a 1/2 dose of wormer to a new horse with no history of worming, the coth experts say it is wrong. Well duh, vets have told me to watch out for the huge worm die offs when a horse full of worms is given wormer. So I got this information from vets about using 1/2 dose for unknown situations.

                  My friend leased a paint who kept rubbing his tail. BO obviously had not wormed him for many months. (She lied about worming all her horses.) So I gave my friend a tube of anthelcideEQ, whic will really clean out horses and really kills pin worms that cause tail rubbing. So fortunately my friend gave the wormer to the BO/horse owner, who gave it to the paint, who colicked. Vet came out after much discussion and a day and night of my friend and I staying with the horse. Vet pulled huge masses of worms from the rectum. I saw at least 3 different kinds of worms and some were huge. Horse was OK after this and went on regular worming routine while my friend leased him.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This isn't about "COTH" saying it's wrong. It's about parasitologists and anyone concerned about and studying resistance issues saying it's a bad idea.
                    ______________________________
                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another thought is that he may not be as old as 8 months since he is so small. He may be much younger and needs a milk replacer like someone else suggested. A visit from the vet will help clear that up as well.

                      No pictures We must see pictures
                      RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
                      May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
                      RIP San Lena Peppy
                      May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I too have been told by the vet to give only 1/2 dose of Ivermection to a weak or sick horse, so as not to kill off all the worms at once.

                        HOWEVER, that was years ago, and literally within the last 1-2 years, just about everything we have learned or ever been told about deworming has changed.

                        You can't rest on what your vet told you 5 or 10 or 20 years ago. You have to view the research as it is TODAY. And JB is right. When you do 1/2 dose, you only kill off the weak worms that were probably going to die anyway. Those left behind are now exposed to the Ivermectin, and they can evolve to become resistent to it. As she said, this is why you're always supposed to take the full course of antibiotics, even if you feel fine after 3 or 4 days on it. Any bacteria left behind that aren't killed, are now stronger and wiser.

                        We have no new dewormers on the horizon and if we fudge ourselves over in the Ivermectin department, we're really in trouble.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Echoing what everyone else has said about getting the vet involved. Get an accurate weight so you can deworm and treat for ulcers with a treatment dose of the real stuff, ulcergard or gastrogard. This is not the time to guess or play around with alternatives as there is a very real chance he will die. Jingles for all involved.
                          McDowell Racing Stables

                          Home Away From Home

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree with the others and the vet visiting is the wise choice here. All sorts of problems from ranging from being scared out of his wits to parasites to illness could be at the heart of the problem and as mentioned likely with your desciption this poor colt has more than one issue going on.

                            But one thing you may consider in addition to the vet is trying a bit of warm bran mash. If he has upper resp issues starting he can not smell correctly. It is also likely that the beginnings of mucus going down his throat into his tummy is giving him an uneasy stomache. Ulcers as mentioned also possible. So there are plenty of reasons to not want to try new feeds rather foreign to the feel inside of his mouth. But sometimes the soft warm feel of bran mash is pleasing to them...I call it their comfort food and if he takes it the owner can start small but very frequent feedings and hide/gradually increase other more beneficial ingredients such as alfalfa pellets, colt pellets and much more.

                            Also tell your neighbor rehab takes time. Miracles are never over night in these cases. If he never had a wonderful start to begin with it is a long up hill battle of getting them going on good feed slowly, dealing with multiple health issues and not to mention gaining their trust during all this.

                            Best wishes to you and your neighbor for trying!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Low dose of dewormer - bad idea. We know better now.

                              Besides that - a horse who has a high wormload and is going to colic from dieoff is going to colic for one reason or the other - pick your poison, so to speak.
                              "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                              ---
                              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Auventera Two View Post
                                I too have been told by the vet to give only 1/2 dose of Ivermection to a weak or sick horse, so as not to kill off all the worms at once.

                                HOWEVER, that was years ago, and literally within the last 1-2 years, just about everything we have learned or ever been told about deworming has changed.

                                You can't rest on what your vet told you 5 or 10 or 20 years ago. You have to view the research as it is TODAY. And JB is right. When you do 1/2 dose, you only kill off the weak worms that were probably going to die anyway. Those left behind are now exposed to the Ivermectin, and they can evolve to become resistent to it. As she said, this is why you're always supposed to take the full course of antibiotics, even if you feel fine after 3 or 4 days on it. Any bacteria left behind that aren't killed, are now stronger and wiser.

                                We have no new dewormers on the horizon and if we fudge ourselves over in the Ivermectin department, we're really in trouble.
                                Exactly

                                I did hear though that someone in Sweden is working on a new chemical - haven't had real confirmation but I think it's probably pretty reliable. Even assuming it's true it will still be quite a few years most likely before it's available.
                                ______________________________
                                The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by JB View Post
                                  This isn't about "COTH" saying it's wrong. It's about parasitologists and anyone concerned about and studying resistance issues saying it's a bad idea.
                                  As a DVM I'd like to pipe in and echo what JB is saying. I often?Occasionally? disagree with her advice but in this case I'm behind it 100%.

                                  Even 2 years ago we used to say "give a half dose" or "give a quarter dose" not now that we realize what's going on with resistance to dewormers. Honestly, some DVMs skip the parasit lectures at CE conferences and go to the more important ones (new surgical techniques, emergency care, anesthesia etc-there is simply no way to go to every class and some of us-me included-skip some of the pharmacology/parasitology type courses)

                                  I now advise my clients to do fecals and blood work-and give an exact dose per weight of something like Fenbendazole or Pyrantel depending on fecal results. The last few I've had experiment with an anti-endotoxic dose of banamine starting 1hr before deworming and continuing for 48 hours. One case the FEC was so high we hosptialized the patient so we could monitor him. But we still gave the full weight appropriate dose. We have a scale and it's always free for our clients to stop in and weigh their horses at any time-we have them do this so we can RX an appropriate dose.
                                  Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
                                  Sam: A job? Does it pay?
                                  Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
                                  Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    If the horse is eating hay I wouldn't worry about getting grain into the colt right now. It will come. Offer it but you can't make them eat it. We rescued two about that age that had never had any so they didn't eat it. Un-natural as far as they were concerned. They also didn't drink from water buckets. They thought that's what puddles were for. I would deworm and give him a little time and all the decent hay he can eat.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      To get a foal who has not been accustomed to seeing or eating grain before, one must be creative. Aside from the worm and ulcer situation, and whether you need a vet for info and treatment for these things or others that may be plagueing this foal, getting him to realize that grain is food is the key. If he never learned that with his mother, he has to learn it by himself now. The monkey see monkey doo method works when the mare eats grain, and the foal watches that. Try different grains, even things that aren't exactly the prime foal feed that you will want him to eat for maximum health etc. Offering straight oats sometimes will tempt them, it's "natural", grass seed. Sometimes putting a few grains of oats into their mouth by hand, to get the taste of a few that don't get spat out. Also, put a handful of oats on top of a slightly worn salt block, worn into a bowl on top so they stay there. The foal will be attracted to the salt block, and if he gets a few oats while looking at licking the block, he gets the taste. Once he will eat oats, you can expand what he will accept to other, balanced foal feeds. Until then, treatment for what may be a problem for him heathwise, and good quality hay. If you don't have success with oats, try a sweet feed, the molassas content can tempt them to eat. Keep an eye on his temperature regularly, if he's got an ulcer, if it gets infected it can be quickly terminal if not recognized and treated.

                                      Good luck.
                                      www.cordovafarm.weebly.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        You can make an oat float with a cup of oats in the water bucket. You can add some molasses, honey, or gatorade to the water for extra flavor.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X