• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Getting back into work - back sore

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Getting back into work - back sore

    I have a horse that was off all winter that I'd like to bring back into condition, but am having problems even establishing a regular work routine because he's been plagued by back soreness.

    I have had a saddle fitter (a qualified master saddler for what that's worth) check my tack and it fits. He moves well and fluidly on the longe line. He's in good condition in terms of weight and health. His top line needs work but he doesn't have any extreme issues like huge hollows on either side of the wither or a protruding spine. No history of back issues.

    Work has been light - I've been starting with rides of 45-60 min, just walking, working on suppleness and stretching. However, due to bouts of soreness, under saddle work has been sporadic.

    However, now I'm wondering if that duration is too long for a horse that's not been ridden for several months. Should I start with shorter rides - say 15 minutes - to "reacclimate" his back to the weight of a rider?

  • #2
    I think you can expect some soreness coming back to work. I know that after I haven't ridden in a while I'm sore afterward, but... I would think that keeping him in work would be better than working him and not working him. I don't think 45-60 minutes of walking is too much, but I would keep my sessions shorter like 30 minutes and get some trotting in there. Lungeing in sidereins will also help build his topline and will help build strength without adding the weight of a rider. Nice long walks out on the trail and some hills will also help.

    Has he seen a vet for soundness? Sore hocks, sore feet can cause a sore back also.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 16.1h OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm just bringing one of mine back into work too after several months off. He's a bit different than yours though b/c he's working his way through foot rehab.

      I found when I first started working him a month or so ago, he got sore very easily - like 20 min. of walk and light trot. I realized he was still sore from the feet and his muscles needed more time heal.

      I started riding him again a month or so later and he's much better this time. His feet are in better balance (but still have a ways to go) and he can handle a bit more work. I ride him about 4x's per week not more than 30 min usually. Walk, mostly trotting on the aids and a bit of canter and some hill work.

      I check him all the time though and give him lots of massages so his back doesn't get too tight.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would also reduce the time and see if that helps -- if not there may in fact be hock issues or even back issues -- sometimes a lack of muscle will bring these things to the fore even if you haven't noticed them before.

        I would NOT lunge an unfit horse in sidereins. This is a lot of stress on tendons and ligaments that need time to be able to carry the horse in self carriage on a small circle.

        Lots of walking, on terrain, first. Then the other stuff.
        The big man -- my lost prince

        The little brother, now my main man

        Comment


        • #5
          I think I'd start over with hand walking for 30 minutes a day, some light hills if you can, so you can get his muscles working without carrying weight.

          After 1-2 weeks, get on and keep the same 30 minutes of walking, nothing different, no flexing, no "on the bit", and see where you are after another week.

          If he's still fine, then start asking for small segments of more correct work in the same 30 minutes.

          keep increasing things in relatively small increments - intensity or duration, never both at the same time. That will help you pinpoint what's causing it.

          I would think that 45+ minutes of active walking with suppling and stretching could indeed make a horse sore when he hasn't worked in 3+ months. How fit was he before his Winter vacation?
          ______________________________
          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by asterix View Post
            I would NOT lunge an unfit horse in sidereins. This is a lot of stress on tendons and ligaments that need time to be able to carry the horse in self carriage on a small circle.
            A few minutes in trot each direction with them adjusted correctly for his fitness level on a 20 meter circle shouldn't hurt him, unless there is a soundness issue.
            Boyle Heights Kid 1998 16.1h OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
            Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
            "Once you go off track, you never go back!"

            Comment


            • #7
              I tend to agree with asterix but it depends on the "when" of doing this. I would NOT put side reins on an unfit horse who is also sore-backed. I'd want him reaching as far out and down as he can go on the lunge to help stretch those muscles.
              ______________________________
              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks all for the thoughtful responses and input. I had the vet out this morning and she disagrees with the saddle fitter - he's sore on either side of his withers and she says that chances are about 100% that soreness is caused by something pinching him. I have a new saddle coming, and it should arrive soon, so I hope to have all saddle fit issues resolved. We confirmed that he's sound - no issues with feet or hocks. In the meantime, I'm obviously not riding!

                I have been doing a lot of hand-walking, and will continue to do that, with a little longing, because he really is getting the hang of stretching and reaching on the longe, and I agree with JB re: encouraging him to stretch those muscles for the mo. Our outdoor has a little slope to it, and we can walk around the property to get a little more hill work in the meantime.

                When his back is better and we're ready to ride again, I'll keep it short and easy to start, and will gradually add suppling and trot work. He was pretty fit last year - his old owner did a lot with him - trails, jumping, xc, dressage - she's an eventer and had him out and about and going well.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Maybe a couple of visits with the MT/chiro would benefit him
                  Boyle Heights Kid 1998 16.1h OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
                  Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
                  "Once you go off track, you never go back!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I almost said something about your comment about the master saddle fitter, but didn't LOL I was going to say:

                    I know you said....but there have been SO many people, just on this board let alone others, who have had horses practically crippled because of saddles "fitted" by professional fitters, so forgive me if I'm going to ask - are you 1000% sure the saddle fits? If *you* aren't sure, but are relying on someone else, then I wouldn't assume it does fit.

                    I don't trust someone whose work I haven't seen - just the way I am

                    So, it's interesting that he's sore along his withers. Any chance of some saddle fit pictures?
                    ______________________________
                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Since it sounds like the saddle wasn't fitting, even with a new saddle you may need to have a vet/chiro work on him before you see any improvement. Often things like ribs and withers, if caused by a bad fitting saddle won;t fix themselves.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My MT/chiro guy said true back soreness is almost always saddle fit.

                        You could ride bareback, once he isn't sore, until you get the new saddle checked out.

                        You could NOT tell by looking that saddles didn't fit my mare. A sweat pattern was a pretty good indicator, but even that wasn't perfect.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by katyb View Post
                          My MT/chiro guy said true back soreness is almost always saddle fit.

                          You could ride bareback, once he isn't sore, until you get the new saddle checked out.

                          You could NOT tell by looking that saddles didn't fit my mare. A sweat pattern was a pretty good indicator, but even that wasn't perfect.
                          Actually a lot of back soreness is caused by lameness also. But if your chiro guy isn't a vet they wouldn't know this?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Only mentioning this because it hasn't been brought up. You might want to get him on a Mag supplement. I have a horse who has had a sore back for years and he's not even a riding horse. It was evident because every time I groomed him, even the lightest touch would result in his back sinking down. A saddle would make him lose him every loving mind. Back and hips were both sore. I hadn't had much luck with most Mag supplements but put him on Magrestore and it solved all of that back tenderness. Mind you, I had tried various mag supplements for years to the point I thought, well, it's not a mag problem. But on one last try I tried the Magrestore. Made a believer out of me. This is the first year in YEARS I can take any brush to him and he stands still and enjoys it instead of wincing in pain. Surely it's probably saddle fit or something else, but Magrestore is cheap enough to give it a whirl to see if it will help. I've got my guy on one heaping scoop per day. Saw a difference in two weeks. Here's the link if you're interested

                            http://www.performanceequineusa.com/...iummalate.aspx

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by davistina67 View Post
                              Actually a lot of back soreness is caused by lameness also. But if your chiro guy isn't a vet they wouldn't know this?
                              No, I think by "true back soreness" he (and I, btw) meant soreness that actually originates in the back.

                              While he isn't a vet, he "diagnosed" the root cause of a friend's mare's issues, based only on my description, while her vet and the local vet school spent thousands of dollars and months to finally reach the same conclusion. Not that a horse chiropractor is any replacement for a vet in most situations, but that doesn't meant they can't contribute to overall good function and health.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Anyone calling themselves a 'chiro' has to be either a DC or DVM. (either licensed on humans or a vet-if not, they legally cannot call themselves a chiro).
                                Anyway..if it is saddle, just changing saddles won't fix this problem-you will need most likely a MT out to work out the soreness created by the first saddle. Spasms and soreness do not go away on their own.
                                Equine Massage Therapy Classes and Rehab for Horses
                                http://www.midwestnha.wordpress.com[/INDENT]

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by MassageLady View Post
                                  Anyone calling themselves a 'chiro' has to be either a DC or DVM. (either licensed on humans or a vet-if not, they legally cannot call themselves a chiro).
                                  Anyway..if it is saddle, just changing saddles won't fix this problem-you will need most likely a MT out to work out the soreness created by the first saddle. Spasms and soreness do not go away on their own.
                                  Actually in many states, even if you are a DC you can't call yourself a chiro, or even work on horses. In Colorado, they changed the law last year so that DC's can work on horses but they have to go to school first. Up till then, only a vet could adjust a horse unless a vet traveled with to every appointment. Not many DC's have went to school yet but these idiots are out working on horses, I guess worse yet, people pay them to do it without checking out their credentials.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I had a gelding that was backsore a lot and it was actually caused because his selenium levels were too low. Now hes on a vit. e, selenium supplement and it did wonders. Also doing stretches with him to build muscle. Run your finger down the center of there belly from front legs to back and it makes them round there back and stretch out those muscles. It really helped my guy.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Magnesium and selenium ran through my mind, but it sounds like he's not sore all the time, just after he's been ridden correct?? You could get his levels checked just to rule it in or out I guess.

                                      Here's my sore back story...
                                      I had been in the sore back battle with Boy for over a year (maybe closer to 2), ever since my MT/chiro started getting him straightened out and the vet said sore hocks. He came to me with an old SI injury that included a rotated pelvis and a dropped hip. He didn't start having problems with a sore back though until his hocks started bothering him. He didn't look lame behind btw...he just stopped picking up his left lead. Leads had never been an issue until then. Hock injections, regular visits with the MT/chiro didn't take care of it. He would be a little better for a while then get worse. I figured he was so out of whack for such a long time it would take a while for everything to start working right again. Started him on E/Se, that helped a little and he went from laying his ears and smacking me with his tail during grooming to tolerating it. This spring I decided to get his lower back injected. That helped a little but what really seemed to work was the E/Se Mag. He starts off a little stiff now, but works out of it beautifully and is not the least bit sore after work. He went from tolerating his grooming sessions to giving me the "lip" and letting me know he's in heaven by grooming me too. He even enjoys the soft horse hair brush now...he used to snap his teeth at that one

                                      Good luck and I hope you get your boy figured out. I know it must be frustrating.
                                      Boyle Heights Kid 1998 16.1h OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
                                      Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
                                      "Once you go off track, you never go back!"

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I don't think it's an E/Se situation - the horse (TB gelding) loves being groomed, and especially when I really get going with a curry. He drops, his eyes go half mast, the lower lip droops - no sensitivity whatsoever.

                                        We are doing belly lifts, and he has a masseuse.

                                        I am pretty sure we're not looking at a complex issue, since the issue seems to be caused by the combination of my saddle, and the fact that he's not terribly fit.

                                        Thanks all.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X