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Hoof Question-When the Whiteline is Pinkish

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  • Hoof Question-When the Whiteline is Pinkish

    The farrier was out today and when he trimmed Chance (20) he noticed that the whiteline was a little wider and has a pink/orange tint to it. She is a good weight, has controlled time on the grass, hasn't been lame or sick. She has been on Senior feed (3 lbs) at lunch for the last 6 months. She gets 3 lbs soaked alfalfa pellets and 2 lbs of timothy grass hay for breakfast, 4-6 lbs of timothy grass hay for dinner. The farrier felt that it was a nutritional issue/too much sugar?

    I was out of grain today so I went and picked up a low starch grain and am going to replace her alfalfa pellets with orchard grass pellets as I have noticed Chance has been having loose stools since the alflafa pellets started.

    Thoughts?

  • #2
    It's a bruise.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat

    Comment


    • #3
      Be careful of abrubtly switching to a new feed. Changes should be done gradually, so as to prevent the chance of colicing or laminitis.

      At least, this is what we were taught years ago in Pony Club.
      When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mvp View Post
        It's a bruise.
        bruise, blood serum.

        Comment


        • #5
          Foundered feet can also look like that, but I'd expect you'd see other signs too. No lameness, or heat in the feet?

          Comment


          • #6
            By the time you see the pinky color on the bottom of the hoof, bruise is almost always, old. So whatever the cause, it happened a while ago. Dried blood is just growing out to be removed by the horse, wearing it away. Hoof bruise marks stay when healed. So color of helping blood to fix the injury site does not leave the bruise location when healed, like it does on people bruises.

            I would say color is NOT nutritional, or actually a sign of food change. Major food changes make the rings, small or large, on the outside of hoof wall. Not leaving color in the white line.

            Comment


            • #7
              Would a bruise also account for the widening of the white line?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Addison View Post
                Would a bruise also account for the widening of the white line?
                No, but a widening of the white line(disinterdigitation) could account for the bruising.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And stretched white line is sign of incorrect hoof form causing wall of the capsule to be pried away from foot.
                  --Gwen <><
                  "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                  http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    caballus in gray

                    And stretched white line is sign of incorrect hoof form causing wall of the capsule to be pried away from foot.

                    Not necessarily.

                    A stretched white line (the interface of dermal and epidermal laminae) can be found on many short-footed, upright, QH and is usually indicative that some slight destabilization at the interface has occurred at some time, not "incorrect hoof form."

                    Additionally, a stretched white line can be indicative of overwork on hard surfaces, not "incorrect hoof form."

                    If it's my horse, absent any clinical signs, not to worry.
                    Tom Stovall, CJF
                    No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Thanks Tom, I try not to worry but it's hard.

                      The widening of the whiteline and discoloration is on all four feet. At the last visit, 8 weeks ago, her feet looked normal. She is retired and doesn't work at all except for the running around she chooses to do. She has not had any heat or lameness. She just colics now and then.

                      She also is very late shedding out this year and I am starting to wonder about IR. She was tested last year for Cushings and was negative.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tom Stovall View Post
                        caballus in gray

                        And stretched white line is sign of incorrect hoof form causing wall of the capsule to be pried away from foot.

                        Not necessarily.

                        A stretched white line (the interface of dermal and epidermal laminae) can be found on many short-footed, upright, QH and is usually indicative that some slight destabilization at the interface has occurred at some time, not "incorrect hoof form."

                        Additionally, a stretched white line can be indicative of overwork on hard surfaces, not "incorrect hoof form."

                        If it's my horse, absent any clinical signs, not to worry.
                        If the ground has no leverage on an overgrown, long toe then the hoof will be solid, tho, and not separated or stretched. A healthy hoof is solid with no separation between wall and sole. Agree? A stretched white line generally means there's some seperation as the connective laminae have been compromised in some manner -- usually from excessive leverages upon them. (again think long toe, distal edge of hoofwall is leveraged from hoof during hoof mechanism/movement. Just as if you walked on hard ground on your long fingernail -- it would eventually become loose and separated from the nail bed. Not much difference in equine hooves.)
                        --Gwen <><
                        "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                        http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          caballus in gray

                          If the ground has no leverage on an overgrown, long toe then the hoof will be solid, tho, and not separated or stretched.

                          A horse cannot turn its hoof over without the ground acting as a fulcrum for a lever. If the horse moves, leverage exists to some degree.

                          A healthy hoof is solid with no separation between wall and sole. Agree?

                          No ma'am. Healthy is as healthy does (AAEP "0"), not someone's opinion about what constitutes a healthy hoof. Like most farriers who've shod a few QH working on hard ground, I've seen a bazillion healthy hooves with evidence of blood in the white line on horses that would grade a "0."

                          A stretched white line generally means there's some seperation as the connective laminae have been compromised in some manner -- usually from excessive leverages upon them. (again think long toe, distal edge of hoofwall is leveraged from hoof during hoof mechanism/movement.

                          One can only wonder why the presentation is extremely common on short-footed (esp. upright QH-types) horses working on hard ground

                          Just as if you walked on hard ground on your long fingernail -- it would eventually become loose and separated from the nail bed. Not much difference in equine hooves.)

                          Short footed horses working on hard ground and/or those with sub-clinical laminitis often present with stretched white lines, the salient point being that a long toe is not the only precursor to the presentation, or even the most common, depending on the horse's type, environment and work load.

                          When it comes to horses, there are damn few absolutes and "it depends" is always in play.
                          Tom Stovall, CJF
                          No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tom Stovall View Post

                            Short footed horses working on hard ground and/or those with sub-clinical laminitis often present with stretched white lines, the salient point being that a long toe is not the only precursor to the presentation, or even the most common, depending on the horse's type, environment and work load.

                            When it comes to horses, there are damn few absolutes and "it depends" is always in play.
                            Yes, I agree. I agreed with Rick when he said that concerning bruising. I added
                            And stretched white line is sign of incorrect hoof form causing wall of the capsule to be pried away from foot.
                            Stretched white line is not 'healthy'. May be the horse is sound at the present time but continue on with a stretched white line and he won't be sound for long. Sub-clinical - I'm assuming you mean the Developmental stage of Laminitis where no clinical signs are present? Yes, sub-clinical laminitis also can present this way but it still remains if the white line is stretched the hoof is in poor form or has been. It is not 'naturally' stretched and not intended to be. So somewhere along the line some dis-ease or mechanical insult has cause the hoof to 'not be healthy'. Regardless of soundness -- apart from soundness. We're talking healthy vs. not healthy. An ill formed hoof cannot function properly and will result in some sort of repercussions either in the hooves or in the body or both. So I agree that WL is not the *only* precursor but originally I never said that either.
                            --Gwen <><
                            "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                            http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              I have owned Chance for 11 years. This is the first foot problem she has had. She has always been slightgly club-footed on the left front and is slightly low in the heel on the right front. Other than that her feet are healthy, thus my concern with this new change. She has worn shoes on the fronts in the past but has been bare for a few years. In the past she has been a hunter, done dressage, and has been a not so good trail horse. I would think if she had unhealthy feet there would have been problems before now?

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Mrs.ChickenBritches View Post
                                I have owned Chance for 11 years. This is the first foot problem she has had. She has always been slightgly club-footed on the left front and is slightly low in the heel on the right front. Other than that her feet are healthy, thus my concern with this new change. She has worn shoes on the fronts in the past but has been bare for a few years. In the past she has been a hunter, done dressage, and has been a not so good trail horse. I would think if she had unhealthy feet there would have been problems before now?
                                Not necessarily - somethings take time to build up. Figure, too, that if the white line is showing old bleeding then the insult, whatever it was - diet, bruise, long toes, etc. - happened awhile ago and grew down with the hoofwall as it grew. Do you have any pics? Could very well be diet as your farrier suggested -- but also know that processed food causes what's called 'leukocytosis' which can, in turn, cause inflammation over a time. it could very well be a combination of things (diet & hoof related issues). But if you have the same farrier as you've had, he's on spot with noticing what's going on and hopefully will be able to best address your concerns since he knows the horse and knows how he's been trimming.
                                --Gwen <><
                                "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                                http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  caballus in gray, stuff deleted

                                  Yes, I agree. I agreed with Rick when he said that concerning bruising. I added Stretched white line is not 'healthy'. May be the horse is sound at the present time but continue on with a stretched white line and he won't be sound for long.

                                  Balderdash! Sound is as sound does and no one is clairvoyant, not even your august self.

                                  Sub-clinical - I'm assuming you mean the Developmental stage of Laminitis where no clinical signs are present?

                                  "Sub-clinical" means "asymptomatic," it does not imply "developmental."

                                  Yes, sub-clinical laminitis also can present this way but it still remains if the white line is stretched the hoof is in poor form or has been.

                                  So what? At the end of the day, the horse is SOUND!

                                  It is not 'naturally' stretched...

                                  Oh? How'd it get that way?

                                  and not intended to be.

                                  Intended by whom? The horse is SOUND!

                                  So somewhere along the line some dis-ease or mechanical insult has cause the hoof to 'not be healthy'.

                                  The hoof does not meet your personal criteria for "healthy?" Again, so what?


                                  Regardless of soundness -- apart from soundness. We're talking healthy vs. not healthy.

                                  No ma'am, we're talking sound vs. unsound and here in the hinterlands, soundness is the ultimate arbiter of "healthy."

                                  An ill formed hoof cannot function properly and will result in some sort of repercussions either in the hooves or in the body or both.

                                  Balderdash! The horse is SOUND! Your conjecture about the possible effects of what you've personally determined to be an "unhealthy" hoof is as meaningless as distant mouse flatulence.
                                  Tom Stovall, CJF
                                  No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Tom Stovall View Post
                                    caballus in gray, stuff deleted

                                    Yes, I agree. I agreed with Rick when he said that concerning bruising. I added Stretched white line is not 'healthy'. May be the horse is sound at the present time but continue on with a stretched white line and he won't be sound for long.

                                    Balderdash! Sound is as sound does and no one is clairvoyant, not even your august self.
                                    Okaaaaaaaay.

                                    Sub-clinical - I'm assuming you mean the Developmental stage of Laminitis where no clinical signs are present?

                                    "Sub-clinical" means "asymptomatic," it does not imply "developmental."
                                    Developmental (1st stage Lamninitis) IS asymptomatic.

                                    Yes, sub-clinical laminitis also can present this way but it still remains if the white line is stretched the hoof is in poor form or has been.

                                    So what? At the end of the day, the horse is SOUND!
                                    For now.

                                    It is not 'naturally' stretched...

                                    Oh? How'd it get that way?

                                    and not intended to be.

                                    Intended by whom? The horse is SOUND!
                                    For now.

                                    So somewhere along the line some dis-ease or mechanical insult has cause the hoof to 'not be healthy'.

                                    The hoof does not meet your personal criteria for "healthy?" Again, so what?
                                    Healthy is as healthy does. A stretched white line still reperesents an ill-formed hoof and if the form is not corrected the hoof WILL become 'un-sound'. The hoof's overall health is comprised with a stretched white line.


                                    Regardless of soundness -- apart from soundness. We're talking healthy vs. not healthy.

                                    No ma'am, we're talking sound vs. unsound and here in the hinterlands, soundness is the ultimate arbiter of "healthy."
                                    If a hoof is allowed to go on for an indeterminate time with a stretched white line, the inner hoof's (foot's) integrity WILL become compromised at some point.

                                    An ill formed hoof cannot function properly and will result in some sort of repercussions either in the hooves or in the body or both.

                                    Balderdash! The horse is SOUND! Your conjecture about the possible effects of what you've personally determined to be an "unhealthy" hoof is as meaningless as distant mouse flatulence.
                                    Your replies are just so eloquent, Mr. Stovall. I totally disagree with you. An ill formed hoof WILL become unsound at some point in time as it cannot function properly thus the entire hoof is compromised. So, please, take that flatulence and ... ohhhh, never mind.
                                    --Gwen <><
                                    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                                    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      So, Mr. Stovall ... if an ouchy horse, with thin soles, becomes 'unouchy' with shoes and pads, does that make the horse "sound"? The hoof is still ill-formed with thin soles. The shoes don't change that. They offer protection when needed. But they do NOT reverse ill formed hooves.
                                      --Gwen <><
                                      "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                                      http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        My horse has had a stretched while line for years and years. Any farrier I've ever used says its due to her several laminitic episodes in the past and that that white line will always be somewhat stretched due to those past episodes. 3 different farriers have told me this so are they all wrong? My horse is sound and her toes are kept fairly short. Her diet is restricted due to her being prone to laminitis. When I say years, I'm talking 6+ years too. The horse is barefoot and sound.

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