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UPDATE:TX PLAN:Non Shedding horse looks horrible and is on a great diet...suggestions

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  • UPDATE:TX PLAN:Non Shedding horse looks horrible and is on a great diet...suggestions

    I have a rehabbing horse that just went from stall rest to small paddock turnout over the past 10 days. He looks horrible, I have groomed him, bathed him, etc. and he still looks neglected. His winter coat is hanging on for dear life. He hasn't gained weight with the increase in forage.

    He is on a good diet, free choice timothy hay, great pasture, 6.5 lbs of Blue Seal Sentinel LS. Was double dosed wormed last month. Has had all vaccines etc.

    His surgury was major, but he has handled all transitions with ease. I am worried that he may have ulcers, and that will be examined.

    I need tips on how to get him to look better. Everyone in the barn looks smashing and you get to him and he looks like he was just rescued...
    Last edited by SunshineSummertime; May. 11, 2011, 10:04 AM.

  • #2
    Clip him, and curry-curry-curry. But if he's been sick or hurt his body has other priorities--a shiny coat will come when he's done expending all his energy healing/recuperating.
    Click here before you buy.

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    • #3
      One of my four horses does this every year. The first two years I had him, it freaked me out. He looked horrible and finished shedding much later than the others. He'd get patchy with some longer hairs. Like an old pony with Cushings or something. I groom and groom, but it doesn't help much.

      He sheds eventually and looks gorgeous.

      I don't worry about it anymore. I figure it's just the way he is. My horses are out 24/7 with good hay in the winter, good grass in the summer ,and a mineral block or two.
      "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."

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      • #4
        Just a thought-is it possible he may have Cushings?
        http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SunshineSummertime View Post
          He looks horrible, I have groomed him, bathed him, etc. and he still looks neglected. His winter coat is hanging on for dear life. He hasn't gained weight with the increase in forage.

          He is on a good diet, free choice timothy hay, great pasture, 6.5 lbs of Blue Seal Sentinel LS. Was double dosed wormed last month. Has had all vaccines etc.

          Guessing that he doesn't have enough fat to feel warm so just isn't turning loose of it yet. I have a number that aren't slicked out yet (in fact, none of them are truly slick) but we had snow this morning so maybe they think it is still winter.

          If he's not gaining (and it takes a while for one that is thin to begin with to visually be gaining....at a max of a pound or maybe two a day and taking 100 or more pounds to make a one point difference in BCS it can take a month to month and a half to really see any difference ... and I'm inclined to think they replenish internal fat stores before putting on outside layers) have you considered going to alfalfa hay rather than timothy? I've never had wt gain on timothy...had some great maintenance on alf/tim mix but not gain on straight timothy.
          Colored Cowhorse Ranch
          www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
          Northern NV

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          • #6
            If he's getting grain just crack an egg in the feed for one feeding every other day and curry. The extra protein in the egg usually slicks them out in no time. I've never had a horse have a reaction to the egg though I have had one not eat the feed with the egg in it so try a small amount. We used to also put Liquid 747 in the feed to build up their blood while recovering from injury.
            Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
            Originally Posted by alicen:
            What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

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            • #7
              There are like 5 grams of protein in an egg, barely enough to even register metabolically on a horse's nutritional scale!

              A half pound of crappy hay has more protein than an egg.
              Click here before you buy.

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              • #8
                If humans can get salmonella from raw egg, I would assume horses could as well. Not something I would want to risk in any of my horses! Especially a horse who may be immuno-compromised due to surgery or poor condition!
                "You can't fix stupid"- Ron White

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                • #9
                  Ugh, I feel your pain... I go through the same thing with my horse. He's 19 (I've owned since he was 13, and its the same thing every year), in fantastic shape, 5.5-6 body score, gets 1 lb of high quality (Triple Crown) ration balancer, 1 lb of chopped alfalfa forage, all the coastal bermuda hay he can get, wormed when needed (fecal)... and it takes him forever to shed out!! His coat is not like a cushing horse's coat, it just takes forever to shed. And his winter coat is just as shiny as it can be. Go figure. But its so frustrating to drive down the road, and see two pasture ornaments that are half-starved, and have never been wormed in their lives, and are.... completely shed out.

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                  • #10
                    The coat is secondary to the fact he is not thriving some time after surgery. He should be gaining weight
                    with the increase in calories. Combine that weight with the poor coat and overall poor appearance and it could mean some trouble. Especially if he never had a late shedding and poor quality coat before and it is new.

                    Have you had any bloodwork done recently? It's not that expensive and he could have a low grade infection that is not going to go away by itself.

                    Oh, he probably does have ulcers, that responds well to treatment. But ulcers are usually not the cause of a bad coat and poor condition during prolonged surgical recovery.

                    Have the vet pull some blood.
                    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

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                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Thanks for all of the replies!

                      A lot of great input- and here is an update.


                      One week later- the winter coat that is shedding out- is bald underneath...it is like a summer coat is not waiting!

                      I am going to get blood work done this week. I don't like the idea that I have paid such close attention to him for so long to not to the bloodwork. When I curry the part where the winter coat does want to shed- it comes out after some time, but now I am not sure I WANT it to come out!

                      I have never seen a BALD horse before and I am so worried that his will be bald all over by the time this is done!

                      Does it surprise ANYONE that he is...you guessed it- CHESTNUT!!

                      I am so not a happy care giver right now...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SunshineSummertime View Post
                        Thanks for all of the replies!

                        A lot of great input- and here is an update.


                        One week later- the winter coat that is shedding out- is bald underneath...it is like a summer coat is not waiting!

                        I am going to get blood work done this week. I don't like the idea that I have paid such close attention to him for so long to not to the bloodwork. When I curry the part where the winter coat does want to shed- it comes out after some time, but now I am not sure I WANT it to come out!

                        I have never seen a BALD horse before and I am so worried that his will be bald all over by the time this is done!

                        Does it surprise ANYONE that he is...you guessed it- CHESTNUT!!

                        I am so not a happy care giver right now...
                        I used to own a chestnut mare who would practically go bald every spring. She would completely lose her winter coat before the summer coat came in! Your horse may benefit from a fat supplement, and/or simply the addition of flax seeds.
                        Kim
                        'Like' my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Calla...946873?sk=wall

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                        • #13
                          Back in early 90's I had a mare do this....stark naked except for mane/tail/whiskers and eyebrows...looked like a giant Chinese Crested. Called the vet, paid for emergency call out (small fortune) and he drove in, took one look and laughed. Told me that if I had to do something to give her a betadine scrub bath and wait two weeks. Two weeks later...prettiest shiney coat you ever saw. Did this every year. Now have an older (27) year old Arab mare doing the same thing. Hair peeling off in sheets and nothing underneath. Too chilly yet for a bath (temperature ok but breezy) so she's just gonna be naked for a week or two..with a blanket at night.
                          Colored Cowhorse Ranch
                          www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
                          Northern NV

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                          • #14
                            My OTTB gelding that did several springs in a row - only it was in patches - so bald in one spot, winter coat in another... you get the picture Added first BOSS, then flax to his diet, and it hasn't happened since. I'm sure he'll come around - his system has just had a tough go of it. Good luck - I hope he's back to normal soon!!
                            -Jessica

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Callaway View Post
                              I used to own a chestnut mare who would practically go bald every spring. She would completely lose her winter coat before the summer coat came in! Your horse may benefit from a fat supplement, and/or simply the addition of flax seeds.
                              If bloodwork is OK. This.
                              Groom to trainer: "Where's the glamour? You promised me glamour!"

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                              • #16
                                I would think its time for a vets check up anyway.

                                I would ask the vet to assess the horses condition and the benefits at this time of bloodwork, specifically a thyroid analysis.

                                However, your horse has multiple issues that should be dealt with on vets advice.
                                IN GOD WE TRUST
                                OTTB's ready to show/event/jumpers. Track ponies for perfect trail partners.
                                http://www.horseville.com/php/search...=1&ssid=057680

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                                • #17
                                  I have a chestnut TB who usually looks moth-eaten in the spring when he's shedding, except for this year. This winter he dropped weight so I started him on Ultium mid-March and gave him a powerpack at the beginning of April. He's put the weight back on and has a gleam in his eye and for the first time in several years he's shedding evenly. All that to say -- sounds like you're on the right track looking at other nutritional or medical causes for the unusual shedding.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    It's NBD if a horse normally sheds to almost baldness-I have had a couple of those.

                                    If it is new? And following surgery several months back? Accompanied by a failure to thrive? Not so easy to explain away and you should not try to.

                                    Things new and different should never be ignored.
                                    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by findeight View Post
                                      It's NBD if a horse normally sheds to almost baldness-I have had a couple of those.

                                      If it is new? And following surgery several months back? Accompanied by a failure to thrive? Not so easy to explain away and you should not try to.

                                      Things new and different should never be ignored.

                                      Wanted to add, my guy's shedding pattern was for two years following a really terrible bout with shipping fever, and massive antibiotics. He also got infections in the smallest scratches possible - I think his entire system was out of whack. By the time his coat started shedding normally, the infection issues went away too. I certainly am no expert, but I've always believed the chain of events was connected.
                                      -Jessica

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                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        I thank everyone for their opinions and wanted to give you the update on what we decided to do with our ugly duckling. If I have anything to do with it- he will be the shining start in T-minus 30 days!

                                        So with consultation of our vet- this is our regimen:

                                        Winstrol V (stanozolol) to help boost system post surgery and new routine

                                        Gastroguard daily

                                        ACTH every 4 days, 4 total doses

                                        This has started as of 5/3 and I already see an imporvement in coat and overall attitude. He was always happy, but now has that extra glimmer and a little spunk. I will give this routine 30 days and re-evaluate to see if there is more we can do. This treatment is not cheap- however the long term effects of him looking and feeling the way he did was not going to get us anywhere.

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