• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

PLEASE HELP - Pony may lose eye

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PLEASE HELP - Pony may lose eye

    My pony came in on Jan 6 with a slightly puffy eye with a little tearing. Nothing major, and certainly something he has come in with more than once before. I wasn't concerned, and administered some opthamlic anitbiotic ointment. The next day, not too much change, but a slight increase in puffiness and a yellow discharge. At the time I thought, crap, well, the vet's coming in the morning (this was Thursday evening) I'll have him look at it then.

    Friday morning I walked in and almost fainted. His eye looked like it exploded. It literally turned itself inside out. WARNING : PICTURES ARE GROSS

    Pictures here: http://s524.photobucket.com/albums/c.../Arties%20Eye/

    Vet looked at it and said he thought he had injured the eye and was going to be blind in it, from what he could see. Started on Naquazone, bute, genimycin drops and vetropolycin ointment. After 2 days of treatment, there was no change, so I took him to the animal eye specialist.

    The drastic red you see in the pictures is due to glaucoma. Initially we thought he whacked it very hard during turnout and this caused the eyeball to swell and push the insides of the eyelids out. The pressure in his eye at the time registered as an 84 when normal is between 12-20.

    We immediately started him on Acetazolamide to reduce the pressure. We saw immediate improvement, we could actually see the eyeball. At his one week checkup, the eye doctor determined that he had actually managed to puncture the eye and it of course, was now infected. We were unable to see the puncture initially due to the dramatic swelling.

    He has been on antibiotics (500mg cephalexin 3x/day) now for about 2 weeks.

    My vet came out and looked at the eye. There is green/yellow infection type stuff within the eye itself. It is still discharging a yellow goo. We will continue him on the antibiotics for a few more weeks. My vet commented that he may have to have the eye removed if the infection doesn't clear up.

    At this point, I financially can't do that. I also don't think emotionally I could do that to him. He is 20 years old, and breaking down behind as well.

    Has anyone here seen anything like this? What timeline would you give before making that decision?

    ETA: sorry if it's not detailed enough. I am very tired tonight and tired of telling this story at the moment. Your thoughts, experiences, and words of encouragement are welcome. Your criticism will not be welcomed.

    Please don't yell at me for not getting the vet out immediately. This is a pony that would regularly get a puffy eye for playing too rough while turned out. He had another eye issue a few years ago in his now "good" eye where he scratched the cornea. He also has a weird way of rolling and scratching his head where he actually manages to get dirt in the middle of his forehead. So this wasn't too out of normal for him until his eye turned inside out.
    Life is hard. After all, it kills you. - K. Hepburn

  • #2
    Holy cow. I'm not gonna yell at you because I would have done the same thing. But before you go jumping ahead of yourself, having the eye removed might be cheaper than all you just went through to try to make it better. It can be done in the field. I haven't gone through it myself (knocks feverishly on wood) but I've asked a vet about it before and remember thinking 'gosh, that's not bad at all (thinking under $300 but I could be WAY off, it's been a few years and my memory sucks). I can send jingles and cyber hugs. Wish I could offer more

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      I kinda had the same thought that it might not really be that expensive.

      There are questions I have before I do that if necessary. Like the risk of spreading the infection.

      I will certainly consider it if it means he can live a normal one-eyed horse pain free existence for several more years. If I'm lucky it will cost less than having him euthanized. So far I've spent About $700. I don't have the bill from my vet yet
      Life is hard. After all, it kills you. - K. Hepburn

      Comment


      • #4
        There are plenty of happy, healthy horses out there with one eye. It sounds like that may be the way to go since it sounds like you are financially and emotionally tapped out - no more medications, no more frequent rechecks with the vet.
        The plural of anecdote is not data.
        Eventing Yahoo In Training

        Comment


        • #5
          I spent some time this summer on a jumper pony with one eye - she didn't let it slow her down one bit!

          Comment


          • #6
            We had a therapy horse at the barn with one eye. He had no more pain, and seemed to feel much better almost immediately. Did fine without it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GatoGordo View Post
              There are plenty of happy, healthy horses out there with one eye. It sounds like that may be the way to go since it sounds like you are financially and emotionally tapped out - no more medications, no more frequent rechecks with the vet.
              She and jaimebaker are right. Your horse will be fine with only one eye and can function for riding, etc. My first horse was blind in one eye (bought that way) and ran barrels, jumped, rode all over the county back then on roads, etc., and was a great horse for me.
              No yelling, but any eye problem can soon develop into a major issue or can be a major issue and look like a scratch at first.
              Good luck. He'll be fine. Eye removal probably sounds traumatic to you, but as other posters say, it will be worth it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I know I had always been told that eye issues can happen quickly, but looking at your pics, it happened very quickly! Wow.

                I don't really have anything to say except good luck and many prayers to you and your pony.

                They certainly do things at the worst possible times!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Earlier this month I got a quote of $1000 for eye removal. I live in southeastern VA.
                  Save lives! Adopt a pet from your local shelter.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is why I always kind of freak out over even the most innocuous eye problem. I had one go downhill fast also. It was a corneal abrasion that got a fungal infection. The pony spent weeks at the vet hospital and the eye was saved but it was touch and go and very expensive.

                    I used to ride a one eyed horse and it never seemed to bother her or slow her down. The only difference in handling her was that you always spoke before touching her on her blind side.

                    Good luck with your pony.
                    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My very first mare was completely blind in one eye and had been for most of her life. We had no idea until we did the PPE and the vet who did the PPE was the mare's vet that had done her for years and never knew! By the time we got her she was starting to go blind in the other eye and she adjusted really well. We had bells that hung on her door and just talked to her. Buddied her up with a pony and she even hauled and was my game pony for years. Losing an eye for MOST horses isn't a big deal. There is a bit of adjustment and I'll see if I can find the article I had that helped me deal with helping her make the adjustment to complete blindness.
                      Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
                      Originally Posted by alicen:
                      What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sanctuary
                        You have a PM. Contact me.
                        Meghan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't screw around with eyes. For good reason. Puffy and tearing, I look at the eye, if I don't see anything, I give a dose of IV Banamine. No improvement and hour later gets an emergency call to the vet.

                          Things can go bad in a hurry, as you found out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Have you gotten a price from the vet on having it removed? It might not be as expensive as you think.

                            I too have known several one eyed horses and all do fine with one eye.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                              I don't screw around with eyes. For good reason. Puffy and tearing, I look at the eye, if I don't see anything, I give a dose of IV Banamine. No improvement and hour later gets an emergency call to the vet.

                              Things can go bad in a hurry, as you found out.

                              Ditto. Esp horse eyes. Horses don't produce as much tears as other species so any damage to the eye is less protected and gets less "healing properties" from tears than do other species.

                              Also the comment about "you put some ointment in it". Never ever keep old, left over eye ointment to use later. For one, if it contains a steroid of any sort and you put in an eye with any infection in it (ie ulcer, laceration, puncture, etc), ESP IN A HORSE, you will make the infeciton worse. Or cause an infection even if there wasn't one to start with since the cortisone stops the eye's immune response to fighting infection.
                              Old eye ointments also get contaminated and can actually SPREAD an infection, even if it does not contain as steroid.
                              Horses are also very susceptable to fungal eye infections. Antibiotics do nothing to treat these and there is some thought that killing off all the bact may let fungi take hold.

                              So if a horse has a bad eye, call a vet. IMHO, it is as much an emergency as is colic, founder or a fracture.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I have had 3 mares who for various reasons have had their eye removed. Its not a big deal and almost pain free for them. BELIEVE ME.............its harder on you then on them!!! I have put 10k into an eye and still had to have it removed. I have put 6k into one and she ended up without hardly any scar (and she was a broodmare). Go figure, it it was my fancy fancy hunter pony I can almost guarantee it would not have been as good an outcome.
                                Sandy
                                www.sugarbrook.com
                                hunter/jumper ponies

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  The cost of eye removal and the cost of euthanasia are with about $200 of each other. Take a long, hard look at the photos you took and ask yourself if it's fair for him to spend another day trying to save an orb he won't be able to see out of IF it heals?
                                  Get that eye OUT. He will be fine, it builds character
                                  www.destinationconsensusequus.com
                                  chaque pas est fait ensemble

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by MeghanDACVA View Post

                                    Also the comment about "you put some ointment in it". Never ever keep old, left over eye ointment to use later. For one, if it contains a steroid of any sort and you put in an eye with any infection in it (ie ulcer, laceration, puncture, etc), ESP IN A HORSE, you will make the infeciton worse. Or cause an infection even if there wasn't one to start with since the cortisone stops the eye's immune response to fighting infection.
                                    Old eye ointments also get contaminated and can actually SPREAD an infection, even if it does not contain as steroid.
                                    Horses are also very susceptable to fungal eye infections. Antibiotics do nothing to treat these and there is some thought that killing off all the bact may let fungi take hold.

                                    So if a horse has a bad eye, call a vet. IMHO, it is as much an emergency as is colic, founder or a fracture.
                                    This bears repeating.
                                    Amen.
                                    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                                    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      There is an equine ophthalmologist at New Bolton Center -- Dr. Mary Utter. It might be worth giving her a call just to find out what all your options are (and the prices for each).

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Jingles for your horse and you ~

                                        Just Jingles for your horse and you ~

                                        JINGLE JINGLE JINGLE & AO ~ ALWAYS OPTIMISTIC ~
                                        Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X