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Negative plantar angle + patellar fixation

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  • Negative plantar angle + patellar fixation

    Reb is going to the doc tomorrow for stifle issues, we're taking rads all 'round to see whats going on from the ground up. His stance behind has always looked NQR, so since we're checking, we'll be thorough.

    His stifle issues are getting worse-last night he was loose in the ring to play/roll, and he bucked/kicked, and came down quite sore-it appears both sides are equally affected. Is that typical? I felt around last night, thinking I might rub it a little, if it was charliehorsed, and damn near got kicked.

    I'm probably getting ahead of myself here, but I'm a worrywart and want to be able to ask intelligent questions:

    If it IS NPA+stifles, which came first? Did NPA cause stifle issues or did sore stifles cause him to wear his feet into an NPA stance? I'm curious, because I'd like to fix root cause first, and see if the secondary issue resolves, but I don't know where to start.

    If it IS NPA-whats the best way to fix? I've read the articles on Ovniceks site, and elsewhere, and it appears that a wedge pad with frog pressure-creating inserts is recommended...pros? Cons? Better mousetraps?

    We've been doing a tremendous amount of in hand work to build HQ muscling lost to EPSM, including backing (correctly), etc. No hillwork because my riding time is strictly after dark this time of year. Dr R mentioned potential treatments to be splitting the tendon & severing the tendon if that doesn't work...he said he's going to dig into the current literature on it this afternoon.

    I've read about injecting the joint-I'm assuming it's HA or a steroid that's injected (its never really been speficied...)? Blistering wasn't mentioned by the vet, I don't know if I should ask about it? Is it effective enough to be worth trying first?

    I'm just trying to get my ducks in a row to know what to read up on this afternoon, so I can make intelligent decisions tomorrow.
    I am not allowed to look at breeding stock.
    Or babies. Or CANTER, et al.

    ESPECIALLY not CANTER, et al.

  • #2
    When they take rads for NPA, make sure BOTH hindfeet are loaded on blocks, else you can not judge the palmar angle correctly, not all vets are actually aware of that.
    I know since I went down that route in the past too.

    FWIW, my horse had bullsnosed hinds (indicative of NPA), rads with both hinds loaded!, showed close to zero angle, but not NPA.
    My horse also has loose stifles (delayed patellar release) has had it for more then 2 years now. Great trimming with improved angles on the hinds, did not fix that.
    Nor did it fix him dragging his hindtoes. As a result he's now in heavy draftshoes to save his toes.

    With regards to the EPSM, did you have that diagnosed? If I remember correctly you concluded that thru trial & error via diet? Flame suite zipped, but please be cautious about self-diagnosing. I used to think my horse had EPSM too, because he had all the symptoms & he had been diagnosed by a vet with shivers. Well, we did the biopsy and it came back negative for EPSM. From my readings there are very many self-diagnosed EPSM horses out there, but really when you look at the confirmed cases, been diagnosed via bloodtest or biospy, it is still rather rare.
    Be cautious about the oil-diet. Recently I read about another self-diagnosed EPSM cases on the high oil diet that ended up with laminitis, coz high fat in IR prone or insulin sensitive horse can trigger IR as well as laminitis.
    I think it's often best to air on the side of caution before doing things that are unnatural to the horse.

    Hopefully Patty will come on this thread and give you some more info on the NPA, she was a great help to me when I asked questions this regarding way back when we were fixing that with my horse.

    Also from the guru of stifles himself (Dr Tnibar), as of today it is unknown why horses have IUFP, confirmation & bad angles may predispose them, but doesn't have to, same with weak hindend musculature.
    Injecting the joint itself with HA only makes sense if X-rays show it to be necessary due to changes. My horse's X-rays were clean, we nevertheless injected to no avail.
    Blistering the ligament helps in some cases but often has to be repeated. Nevertheless I think it's still a good start.
    Some have reported improvement on estrone, but again not all.
    The ligament splitting/perforation surgery (under standing sedation) is another option and probably one's best bet and been known to be succesful in a number of cases, but again some had to be repeated. (EqTrainer has a horse that had it done, do a search on perforation surgery, some good info there too).
    Yes, you are right with IUFP, usually both sides are affected, however it's often noticeable mostly on the one side.

    I'm currently awaiting the outcome of my horse's SI, but when back into work and the IUFP is back, the splitting surgery will be on the table.
    And if the hindend NQR cannot be pinpointed, ask vets if SI could be involved, that was a surprising outcome with my horse.

    I think what you are doing at present, in hand work etc to try to strengthen the hind end is very good and hopefully will help. If stifle x-rays are clean, the simplest route would be blistering as a start.
    And get your farrier the rads of his hindfeet to rebalance. From my experience not many farriers are overly keen on wedging hindfeet with frogpads.
    Last edited by Lieslot; Dec. 16, 2010, 03:10 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Did NPA cause stifle issues or did sore stifles cause him to wear his feet into an NPA stance?
      In my experience, NPA is generally accompanied by some other issue higher up in the limb which causes the horse to bear weight abnormally.

      Until the "cause" of abnormal weight bearing is corrected or "managed" the NPA issue will continue no matter what kind of special trimming and shoeing package is applied.

      I'm curious, because I'd like to fix root cause first, and see if the secondary issue resolves, but I don't know where to start.
      In my opinion, based on experience with multiple cases, NPA is secondary to hock, stifle, or sacral problems. Though some kind of special shoeing package may be required initially, once the problem above the hair line is diagnosed and treated, the NPA sorts itself out . . . and sometimes NPA returns after the "injections" wear off.

      If it IS NPA-whats the best way to fix?
      It depends on what other part of the horse is involved in the abnormal weight bearing, and it depends on what kind of treatment is given, i.e. injections, chiropractic adjustments, etc.

      I've read the articles on Ovniceks site, and elsewhere, and it appears that a wedge pad with frog pressure-creating inserts is recommended...pros? Cons? Better mousetraps?
      I recommend that you get your vet and farrier to work together to understand the mechanics of your particular horse's situation. As long as the stuff above the hair line is not working correctly, you can stuff, pack, and wedge till the cows come home, but none of it will overcome the abnormal compensatory weight bearing.

      Dr R mentioned potential treatments to be splitting the tendon & severing the tendon if that doesn't work...he said he's going to dig into the current literature on it this afternoon.
      Um, how many of these "treatments" has the Dr. done? What kind of track record does the doc have with this kind of orthopedic stuff?

      I've read about injecting the joint-I'm assuming it's HA or a steroid that's injected (its never really been speficied...)
      Seems to me that you might want to ask, "Whazzat yer shootin inta me horsie there, Doc?"

      Blistering wasn't mentioned by the vet, I don't know if I should ask about it? Is it effective enough to be worth trying first?
      I'm in favor of blistering the vet with questions until you are confident in the answers you are getting.

      I'm just trying to get my ducks in a row to know what to read up on this afternoon, so I can make intelligent decisions tomorrow.
      It ain't duck season yet, is it?

      Comment


      • #4
        How is his hind end conformation in general? Is he straight through the hock, what do his pasterns look like?

        Just throwing this out there for you, but have you thought of early stages of DSLD/ESPA? I had a Peruvian mare with this and she was already quite old and very advanced when I got her, but a fellow boarder had a QH gelding that presented with some strange symptoms.

        He started feeling "loose" behind. They thought something neuro at first. Then thought stifle problems. Multiple vet, chiro, acupuncture, etc with no changes. Then went lame in front, they thought navicular. Then his hinds started getting that bull-nosed shape. Then his hocks started going. It took a couple of years, but if you looked at him before and after there was quite a change in his body. His hind end straightened through the stifle and hock and his pasterns all around dropped a bit, but not to the "classically" DSLD look. She never had him tested, and I've moved out of the country since and have no contact, but I'd have bet anything he would have tested positive for it.

        Like I said, just a thought having never seen your guy. While most people think DSLD=super dropped pasterns that's not always the case. It is a systemic disease of connective tissue.

        http://www.angelfire.com/bc/curlygait/DSLD.html

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
          When they take rads for NPA, make sure BOTH hindfeet are loaded on blocks, else you can not judge the palmar angle correctly, not all vets are actually aware of that.
          I know since I went down that route in the past too.
          Really good to know-and may have saved me some $. Thank you!

          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
          FWIW, my horse had bullsnosed hinds (indicative of NPA), rads with both hinds loaded!, showed close to zero angle, but not NPA.
          My horse also has loose stifles (delayed patellar release) has had it for more then 2 years now. Great trimming with improved angles on the hinds, did not fix that.
          Nor did it fix him dragging his hindtoes. As a result he's now in heavy draftshoes to save his toes.
          He doesn't have a bullnosed toe, but very, very low heels, and his hind end is just NQR. He stands cockeyed the same way quite often, so I suspect there's something funky somewhere inside.
          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
          With regards to the EPSM, did you have that diagnosed? If I remember correctly you concluded that thru trial & error via diet? Flame suit zipped, but please be cautious about self-diagnosing. I used to think my horse had EPSM too, because he had all the symptoms & he had been diagnosed by a vet with shivers. Well, we did the biopsy and it came back negative for EPSM. From my readings there are very many self-diagnosed EPSM horses out there, but really when you look at the confirmed cases, been diagnosed via bloodtest or biospy, it is still rather rare.
          Be cautious about the oil-diet. Recently I read about another self-diagnosed EPSM cases on the high oil diet that ended up with laminitis, coz high fat in IR prone or insulin sensitive horse can trigger IR as well as laminitis.
          I think it's often best to air on the side of caution before doing things that are unnatural to the horse.
          at the flame suit! It was simply by diet, with the caveat that as soon as I can get ringbone horse stable, I'm going to do the biopsy. I have to sort of prioritize my vet stuff, here, unfortunately. He went from unable to hold his hind legs up enough to pick them out on Monday, got his first oil Tuesday, and I was able to hold his feet normally on Wednesday. That said-I'm still planning to get the biopsy-if for no other reason than the diet is $$$! I'll probably schedule the biopsy tomorrow, I'm going to be making payments anyway, so may as well add another to the list, esp if he's going to be sedated for the blister anyway. Two birds with one stone, and all that, right?

          I'm still confused how fat can cause IR in horses; I need to get educated on that. (If my brain doesn't blow up first!) My human endocrinology knowledge is getting in the way of me understanding that.

          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
          Hopefully Patty will come on this thread and give you some more info on the NPA, she was a great help to me when I asked questions this regarding way back when we were fixing that with my horse.
          (I stalked your posts...you and dwblover) Happend to find you and your big guy on vid-he's really cool!

          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post

          Also from the guru of stifles himself (Dr Tnibar), as of today it is unknown why horses have IUFP, confirmation & bad angles may predispose them, but doesn't have to, same with weak hindend musculature.
          Injecting the joint itself with HA only makes sense if X-rays show it to be necessary due to changes. My horse's X-rays were clean, we nevertheless injected to no avail.
          Blistering the ligament helps in some cases but often has to be repeated. Nevertheless I think it's still a good start.
          Some have reported improvement on estrone, but again not all.
          The ligament splitting/perforation surgery (under standing sedation) is another option and probably one's best bet and been known to be succesful in a number of cases, but again some had to be repeated. (EqTrainer has a horse that had it done, do a search on perforation surgery, some good info there too).
          Knowing that it has to be repeated is helpful...I'll reread EqTrainer's stuff, I read most of this at about 10 pm last night, so some of the details are a little fuzzy.

          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post

          Yes, you are right with IUFP, usually both sides are affected, however it's often noticeable mostly on the one side.

          I'm currently awaiting the outcome of my horse's SI, but when back into work and the IUFP is back, the splitting surgery will be on the table.
          And if the hindend NQR cannot be pinpointed, ask vets if SI could be involved, that was a surprising outcome with my horse.

          I think what you are doing at present, in hand work etc to try to strengthen the hind end is very good and hopefully will help. If stifle x-rays are clean, the simplest route would be blistering as a start.
          I'll ask about blistering. Jeesh, that just sounds painful. But it's gotta be the lesser of two evils.
          Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
          And get your farrier the rads of his hindfeet to rebalance. From my experience not many farriers are overly keen on wedging hindfeet with frogpads.
          Are frogpads necessary? I'm assuming they are-but again, am in new territory.

          At this point...I don't even know what to hope for. I don't know which is the easiest/best thing to have to fix. But I appreciate the insight!
          I am not allowed to look at breeding stock.
          Or babies. Or CANTER, et al.

          ESPECIALLY not CANTER, et al.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have been told that not all EPSM horses biopsy for it
            "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
            ---
            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
              In my experience, NPA is generally accompanied by some other issue higher up in the limb which causes the horse to bear weight abnormally.

              Until the "cause" of abnormal weight bearing is corrected or "managed" the NPA issue will continue no matter what kind of special trimming and shoeing package is applied.
              In my opinion, based on experience with multiple cases, NPA is secondary to hock, stifle, or sacral problems. Though some kind of special shoeing package may be required initially, once the problem above the hair line is diagnosed and treated, the NPA sorts itself out . . . and sometimes NPA returns after the "injections" wear off.

              It depends on what other part of the horse is involved in the abnormal weight bearing, and it depends on what kind of treatment is given, i.e. injections, chiropractic adjustments, etc.
              That's what I'd gathered from reading, but also knew that I wasn't perhaps getting the whole story, given my fairly rudimentary understanding.

              So if wonky stifle use (as an example-It may be SI, who knows?) is creating NPA, and NPA aggravates sticky stifles, where do you start? Fix the NPA, and then see what the fallout is, and then sort of whackamole until you get it all put back right?


              I recommend that you get your vet and farrier to work together to understand the mechanics of your particular horse's situation. As long as the stuff above the hair line is not working correctly, you can stuff, pack, and wedge till the cows come home, but none of it will overcome the abnormal compensatory weight bearing.
              Yep, they are-or, rather, will. He has a farrier that he uses a lot, and recommends-scheduling will be a bitch, as he travels in, but its better than doing it with someone who doesn't know-or worse, knows everything.
              Um, how many of these "treatments" has the Dr. done? What kind of track record does the doc have with this kind of orthopedic stuff?
              I don't have the foggiest-probably a bunch, as he's one of the more prominent vets in the area, but that's one of the questions I have on my list to find out. I'm not going to hold him to a treatment protocol he mentioned in passing without actually seeing the horse, until I actually talk to him face to face-AFTER he's checked out the joints.
              Seems to me that you might want to ask, "Whazzat yer shootin inta me horsie there, Doc?"
              Yep...more people need to ask questions...whether its kids, horses, dogs, whatever. (It's a bit of a soapbox issue...be forewarned) When it comes to down to it, believe me, I will be. I'm the patient from hell, because I want to know what, why, why not, and how it works. I was just curious, because it was never specified- what others folks had had injected-HA? Steroids? Vodka?

              It ain't duck season yet, is it?
              Shot my first turkey of the year yesterday...scared the hell out of everyone in the frozen food section.

              [QUOTE]
              Originally posted by beaulilly View Post
              How is his hind end conformation in general? Is he straight through the hock, what do his pasterns look like?
              He's a hard one to figure out-sometimes I think he's a bit sickle hocked, and others, I think he's too straight. This goes back to the NQR stance that I mentioned-he's straight-legged, but stands camped under, which makes me think there's an alignment issue.

              Just throwing this out there for you, but have you thought of early stages of DSLD/ESPA? I had a Peruvian mare with this and she was already quite old and very advanced when I got her, but a fellow boarder had a QH gelding that presented with some strange symptoms.

              He started feeling "loose" behind. They thought something neuro at first. Then thought stifle problems. Multiple vet, chiro, acupuncture, etc with no changes. Then went lame in front, they thought navicular. Then his hinds started getting that bull-nosed shape. Then his hocks started going. It took a couple of years, but if you looked at him before and after there was quite a change in his body. His hind end straightened through the stifle and hock and his pasterns all around dropped a bit, but not to the "classically" DSLD look. She never had him tested, and I've moved out of the country since and have no contact, but I'd have bet anything he would have tested positive for it.

              Like I said, just a thought having never seen your guy. While most people think DSLD=super dropped pasterns that's not always the case. It is a systemic disease of connective tissue.

              http://www.angelfire.com/bc/curlygait/DSLD.html
              Here and Here are a couple different pics.
              I hadn't ever considered DSLD, because this at :06 is what he does at the trot/canter, followed immediately by a vigorous kick/buck with both hind legs, both are brought down in a bunny hop, and its then repeated again, or 2-3 times, depending. Usually after the last kick/buck he comes down a little tender, winces and it just looks like the stifle is what hurts. Scientific, I know, but it's what I got.

              I will, however, go take a good look at the suspensory. I'm going to leave definitive Dx to Dr R, but I will absolutely ask him to flexion test him. Thanks for suggesting it-I'd not considered it!
              Last edited by Eklecktika; Dec. 16, 2010, 06:01 PM. Reason: Put links in wrong spot.
              I am not allowed to look at breeding stock.
              Or babies. Or CANTER, et al.

              ESPECIALLY not CANTER, et al.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post
                I have been told that not all EPSM horses biopsy for it
                YES! I have heard this too!

                Is treatment based on symptoms, then?
                I am not allowed to look at breeding stock.
                Or babies. Or CANTER, et al.

                ESPECIALLY not CANTER, et al.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Eklecktika
                  (I stalked your posts...you and dwblover) Happend to find you and your big guy on vid-he's really cool!
                  Oh you naughty person you are, and I try to be so good to erase my vid & pic trails, haha .
                  Thanks, yes, he's a nice guy, just like you I wished I could get to the bottom of it all. We did all diagnostics, and it's assumed to be the SI, but not sure what he'll be like once the SI isn't bothering him anymore, most likely he will still slip the stifle and he still won't be able to hold up a leg for the farrier unless sedated. I'm left with questions too, and certainly frustrations. Ruling one thing out after the other.
                  Originally posted by Eklecktika
                  He doesn't have a bullnosed toe, but very, very low heels, and his hind end is just NQR. He stands cockeyed the same way quite often, so I suspect there's something funky somewhere inside.
                  The hindend, especially higher up is so hard to get a firm diagnosis on, but balanced feet are a start, so they say. And here's the irony in it all. In 2007 my horse had bad bullsnosed hinds, clearly not right, great farrierwork for a couple of years by 2009, the hinds looked so much better, yet precisly when the hinds became more balanced did the IUFP start. So personally I often wonder if some horses are conformationally made up in such a way that actually for them it's more comfortable to walk around with low heels etc rather then the textbook of balanced feet. Changing hoof angles in horses that had a lifelong of off balance feet, yet were functioning in them, does incur changes elsewhere in the body, certain ligaments/tendon suddenly have to stretch or contract due to the new found balance. If done slowly over time it's probably okay, but with regards to wedging, this could cause a sudden change in posture for a horse, which may then cause problems elsewhere, hence I think slow corrective trimming & shoeing is most likely one's best bet.

                  I'm still confused how fat can cause IR in horses; I need to get educated on that. (If my brain doesn't blow up first!) My human endocrinology knowledge is getting in the way of me understanding that.
                  I can't give exact details on this and I'm certainly no expert on this but I found this in the EPSM groups posted by Dr Kellon.

                  Are frogpads necessary? I'm assuming they are-but again, am in new territory.
                  Well yes & no, say you were to use wedge shoes and no pads over time, you could get prolapsed frogs. However if the frogs were to be prolapsed already, which can be the case with NPA, then a frogpad would actually be too much pressure and either a flat pad or no pad would be recommended. But I'm sure Tom can give us more info on that.

                  At this point...I don't even know what to hope for. I don't know which is the easiest/best thing to have to fix. But I appreciate the insight!
                  Good luck at the vets!! Eventhough I supposedly know what's wrong with my guy, I don't know what to hope for the future either. I'm still left with questions that no vet will be able to answer at present.
                  I agree with you on the blistering, personally the pain would worry me, but seems some horses take it very well. And you know sometimes horses take those things much better then we owners do. I was holding my breath over the discomfort he'd have from the biopsy and the stallrest for the stitches etc. Well, he never seemed to feel anything, within an hour he was already out in the pasture bucking & rearing, never showed any pain from it. And today he hasn't even got a scar left. So I concluded that perhaps I'm a bigger whuzz then my horse is .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    IME yes.
                    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                    ---
                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have been told that not all EPSM horses biopsy for it
                      I have read that too, but not seen it confirmed by Dr Valberg, who as far as I'm aware does the majority of biopsies. She surely is familiar enough with those tissue biopsies, that I think her readings are pretty correct, question would be if very early cases don't show.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It would be interesting to ask her. My vet told me Tbs and horses with TB heritage often don't test positive.
                        "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                        ---
                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by beaulilly
                          Like I said, just a thought having never seen your guy. While most people think DSLD=super dropped pasterns that's not always the case. It is a systemic disease of connective tissue.

                          http://www.angelfire.com/bc/curlygait/DSLD.htmlHere and Here are a couple different pics.
                          I have visited that site in the past. It worries me. How sure are they that if a horse flexes negative, the horse does not have DSDL. Seems it's another difficult to know for sure thing. I didn't know Dr Kellon has an iron test for it now.

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                          • #14
                            EqTrainer I'll see what I can find out, I recently entered my horse in the shivers research program, once I get feedback from them, I will ask about possible false negatives on the biopsies.
                            My vet told me Tbs and horses with TB heritage often don't test positive.
                            Or perhaps something else is ongoing.
                            F.ex. my horse's biopsy showed degeneration in line with what is seen with nutritional abnormalities, Vit E & Se, yet his bloodvalues are perfect. So some myopathies don't even have a name in literature yet. I also think that only in recent years biopsies have been performed more frequently and only now they start to see or realize that there's more myopathies out there then previously been aware of.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
                              EqTrainer I'll see what I can find out, I recently entered my horse in the shivers research program, once I get feedback from them, I will ask about possible false negatives on the biopsies.
                              Cool
                              "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                              ---
                              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Here is a little better pic of him that I took for the saddle fitter.

                                (I have 'specks' on my camera sensor, please excuse the noise. It's more to fix than to replace, so along with everything else, I'm buying a new camera.)

                                Any thoughts?
                                I am not allowed to look at breeding stock.
                                Or babies. Or CANTER, et al.

                                ESPECIALLY not CANTER, et al.

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                                • #17
                                  Interesting pics, I cannot see the last one.

                                  My first thought is that your horse has what OTTB peeps call a rotated pelvis from breaking out of the gate. It is tucked under too far. I suspect toe grabs have something to do with it, too. Often accompanied by SI pain but more frequently mid back pain. Sometimes their trochanters are sore, too. Turnout on hills, being ridden on hills correctly, help it a lot. Time helps the most IME, and the chiropractor if you have a good one.

                                  I would imagine that if it is not attended to that over time, it could create a myriad of rear end problems as Tom describes. My concern would be the feet being diagnosed as the problem when perhaps they are a symptom. He appears to be standing on his toes a bit but he also looks like maybe he was about to pee?!!!

                                  What is his history?
                                  "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                                  ---
                                  The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Quote:
                                    Originally Posted by Lieslot
                                    And get your farrier the rads of his hindfeet to rebalance. From my experience not many farriers are overly keen on wedging hindfeet with frogpads.
                                    Are frogpads necessary? I'm assuming they are-but again, am in new territory.
                                    The use of frog support and how much if it is used depends on many factors individual to the horse in question.
                                    I wrote an article recently for the ELPO for farriers concerning decesion making when it comes to the use of frog support and how. Since it has come up here, give me a couple of hours and I will get it up on my own website for you.
                                    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
                                    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
                                    www.hoofcareonline.com

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                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      I'll see if I can get them in a better spot. Photobucket, perhaps.

                                      I picked him up from a rescue because I mostly felt sorry for him-he was being resurrendered (the rescue was full) primarily because he was vicious at feeding time, so they cut his feed back and put a blanket on because he was losing weight(!). He was painfully thin-body scored 2. With plenty of feed, I've seen no aggressive behavior.

                                      He came from FL through Keeneland to Emerald Downs, where he had a track accident and was put in a round corral at left at 14 mos. I don't have the details of the track accident.

                                      He was broke at 4(?) by a lady in Richland (dressage) and homed to a couple in Post Falls, and then I got him. Never raced.

                                      Can you see this?

                                      Does a course of low dose bute, or massage, anything help with the SI pain or trochanter inflammation? I'm still learning about trochanter issues-last night was the first I'd heard of the issue.

                                      In this pic, he is standing as square as I've ever been able to get him to-he always stands NQR, and is either camped under or looks like he's ready to pee, as you say.

                                      He does have a slight roach to his back as well, but that is getting less visible with work and improved muscling.
                                      Last edited by Eklecktika; Dec. 16, 2010, 06:56 PM.
                                      I am not allowed to look at breeding stock.
                                      Or babies. Or CANTER, et al.

                                      ESPECIALLY not CANTER, et al.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Camped under, like in your last picture is precisely how my guy stands on the crossties.
                                        I saw him standing straight & comfortable the first week after SI injections & equiox, but since he's back to standing camped under.

                                        What a history he has, thanks for being such a great person taking him under your wings!

                                        Thanks Patty! No rush, I'll look forward to reading it, it'll be nice to have some literature on it, coz not that much can be found about it.

                                        Ha, off topic, but I noticed I just reached 2,500 posts with this one, now I'm Grand Prix level. LOL.

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