• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Trace Clip vs. Body on a Draftie - Seeking Opinions & Pics

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Trace Clip vs. Body on a Draftie - Seeking Opinions & Pics

    I have a draft mare who is developing a heavy coat already. I live in the southeast so can only imagine what it will be like in Jan. She is worked every afternoon and isn't drying before turned out for the evening. Clipping time. I am debating a trace clip vs. body clip. I like the idea of a trace clip because it's less blanketing -- I'm lazy -- but still allows her to dry off before turning out. I'm also not a big fan of clipping the face. Would that look stupid if I did a full body clip? I am concerned that with her heavy fur that a trace clip will simply look funny (not appropriate for the show ring, although schooling shows) and a full body clip will be more appropriate. I'm sure many of you have faced the same situation. For those of you who have done a trace clip with a horse with a heavy fur coat I'd love to see pics of your finished job. I'll post my pics after I'm done if I haven't butchered her too bad.
    Susan B.
    http://canterberrymeadows.com/

  • #2
    try a bib and belly clip which is clipping out the front of the neck and down between front legs and half of the belly

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&sou...34H7Bw&cad=rja

    Comment


    • #3
      For horses that live out, I frankly prefer a trace clip. I think it's the best of both worlds--provides them with some insulation while keeping the sweaty parts manageable. Perfectly acceptable for hunting or schooling shows, although I wouldn't walk into the A-hunter ring with one.

      I have TBs, so no pics of heavy coated horses with a trace clip. But I worked for a foxhunting sales barn that turned over a Lot of Belgian crosses, and we generally trace clipped them. They looked adorable--like big teddy bears!
      Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.

      Comment


      • #4
        My guy gets a yak coat in the winter and I've trace clipped him a couple of times. I'll admit, that when his winter coat is in full force and I trace clip him, he looks like he's wearing a rug It's kinda shaggy on the edges from his long hairs. It really makes a big difference though on keeping him from getting so sweaty - especially on those unseasonably warm winter days. If I was showing though, I think the full clip would look better. My version of the full clip is everything but the head and legs and, on him, it looks neat enough for non-rated shows.
        "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

        Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!

        Comment


        • #5
          Timely thread!

          My horse is a TB but gets the thickest coat ever. Since we have warm temps this weekend, I'll be washing him, applying a liberal amount of Show Sheen, then clipping away!

          I was thinking I'd do a modified body clip (leave the head, legs, and a patch on the belly), but I may go for a blanket clip or hunter clip.

          Here's a useful site in showing diagrams of different clips.

          http://www.peasridge.co.uk/clipper-a...se-clips.shtml

          Last year I did a trace clip and experienced what SkipHiLad4me did with the shaggy edges when it grew in thicker.

          My horse is very fearful/reactive to clippers and requires sedation. I'll likely end up with whatever clip looks the best before the sedative wears off!

          Comment


          • #6
            This option may not work this year, but keep it in mind for next year. Do a Hunter or Full Body Clip around the 2nd week of September. If you do it this early in the season, you likely won't have to blanket for this first clip. Once this begins to grow out, around mid to late October, you can then go for a low trace or a bib clip of some type. If your temps are mild and you might not need to blanket until later in the winter.

            I have done a hunter clip early, a large trace clip mid fall and then just a bib in Jan. This allows them to be cooler in the warmer weather and warmer in the cooler weather. I fox hunt and don't show, so the clip is whatever keeps horsey comfy, it's not about "fancy" turnout.

            Just a word of warning... Some horses can get VERY frisky when the cool air hits their naked belly. I'd make sure your horse has earned the right to be clipped!!

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a fuzzy belgian/tb cross -- he becomes a YAK in winter. I compete him (eventing) into early November, and he needs to be clipped for his late October competitions. He also lives out 24/7 and I live 50 minutes from the barn, so no fussy blanket changes for us.

              I do a bib clip -- I think you can see it in the "baby" pics in my sig line if you go back to pics early on of our schooling in the winter (that is, not the competition photos).

              I take off under the neck, chest, shoulders, belly JUST to behind the girth. This makes a huge difference for cooling/drying out when sweaty, but allows me to leave him unblanketed throughout the Maryland winter. I blanket when it is cold and rainy (30s and 40s), but NOT for snow or plain cold (20s and 30s).

              He's fine.

              Once in a while I have to use the hair dryer on him, but he stays in full work all winter this way.

              I do not show H/J and imagine this might not fly in that world, but as an eventer, we have no competitions after early November (and no one seems to care then; I've run a horse at a 3 day in late October with this same clip without a problem)...
              The big man -- my lost prince

              The little brother, now my main man

              Comment


              • #8
                The trace clip I do depends on the horse's individual workload and cold weather tolerance. As a fox hunter, I don't have to worry about the contrast of extremely long hair against clipped hair.

                Like the others, I'll do a trace clip early, like now and decide in December if it needs a touch up. The fall trace clip will include clipping the underside of the belly, the chest and neck, 1/2 to 1/3 of the sides to the rump. I'll leave hair on the legs from the elbow down and the gaskin down. In late Feb I'll remove more hair on the sides and make a wide path over the rump at the tail end and clip the legs clean.

                Good luck!

                Comment


                • #9
                  The only photos I've found are from when I trace clipped him early in the season so he didn't have a heavy coat yet. I know I've got one of him in full yak mode with his trace clip I'll post if I can find them.
                  "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

                  Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ditto the Bib clip... very effective on my Clyde-X that turns into a Yak too, and lives out 24/7
                    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      I do the bib clip on several of the geriatric horses in the barn. It's the perfect clip for those that are out a great deal. My mare needs more fur removed. I am about to embark on a modified body clip or trace clip. Will see what she looks like when I start clipping and then I'll know. I'll get some pictures just for fun.
                      Susan B.
                      http://canterberrymeadows.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NCSue View Post
                        I do the bib clip on several of the geriatric horses in the barn. It's the perfect clip for those that are out a great deal. My mare needs more fur removed. I am about to embark on a modified body clip or trace clip. Will see what she looks like when I start clipping and then I'll know. I'll get some pictures just for fun.
                        then do a chaser clip which is larger than a bib and belly

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Huge fan of the chaser/Irish clip - that is what I do each winter. Although we do stop showing in Oct.

                          If I were showing (even local probably), I would do a full clip but leave the legs and head untouched.

                          I am lazy too - but worth the extra blanketing effort to deal with a full clip in order to look neat and tidy at shows. I would feel odd showing in my Irish clip. Just me though.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There’s a pic of my chaser clip in my profile.
                            "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If I choose to do a Bib Clip on my very hairy Welsh Cob, do I need full sized body clippers or can I get away with something smaller?
                              --Luck is what happens when preparedness meets opportunity--

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I think it REALLY depends on your vanity. I HATE trace clips and think they look funny and hate doing them (I find it so much easier just to chop it all off rather than get the lines even, etc). 99% of the time, I do a full clip (though, most times I leave legs), even on turned out horses (that's why God created neck rugs). But, really, unless you are vain like me or plan on showing seriously (mostly in the hunter world) over the winter, do what ever you prefer. And, I think a gross, sweaty, hairy horse is far less attractive then a comfortable trace clipped one.

                                For the record, I will leave faces occasionally. Sometimes, it just isn't worth the battle, like on the little mare we have in our barn. She can be VERY head shy and you can un-do weeks of work on her if she gets a fright about her head...so, when we clip her this week, she'll keep her face. Keep the jaw lined cleaned up and it doesn't look the bad at all.
                                Amanda

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Justmyluck View Post
                                  If I choose to do a Bib Clip on my very hairy Welsh Cob, do I need full sized body clippers or can I get away with something smaller?

                                  Nah, I use my Andis A2? (not sure, will look at barn tomorrow) -- they are NOT full body clippers! It takes a while, but my hairy guys are probably twice the size of your Welsh Cob.

                                  It is true that the clip looks a bit odd, but I have, as I said, evented recognized this way to no ill effect. Since I live 50 minutes from the barn and do self care, there is no way I'd get the blanketing "right" enough of the time to manage the full clip, but yb is right, that looks a lot tidier...
                                  The big man -- my lost prince

                                  The little brother, now my main man

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by asterix View Post
                                    Nah, I use my Andis A2? (not sure, will look at barn tomorrow) -- they are NOT full body clippers! It takes a while, but my hairy guys are probably twice the size of your Welsh Cob.

                                    It is true that the clip looks a bit odd, but I have, as I said, evented recognized this way to no ill effect. Since I live 50 minutes from the barn and do self care, there is no way I'd get the blanketing "right" enough of the time to manage the full clip, but yb is right, that looks a lot tidier...

                                    Thanks I appreciate it. I used my BOs Oster Clipmasters to get the really thick long stuff and am going to touch him up periodically with my smaller osters that say for a medium work load.

                                    We are in Florida for pete sake. Hes preparing for a blizzard!
                                    --Luck is what happens when preparedness meets opportunity--

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      So....
                                      What is your secret to getting both sides even? I don't want someone in the hunt field to be behind me (there is always someone behind me, as my horse refuses to even be considered as the last horse in the field) and see my ugly, lopsided clip. (What happened? Were you drinking, or it your horse just lopsided?)
                                      One year I did a trace clip and used a saddle pad to get semi- even. Then proceeded to do a full body because, well, it looked like I'd been drinking, LOL! (Doesn't help that horse is very tickle-ish and hates standing still at any time, much less for an hour of clipping!)
                                      Standardbred Lover- owner of Studs Hooligan, aka Strider, ex- pacer, retrained for eventing and endurance
                                      Strider-OTSTB-, Gus-OTTB-, and Rio-rescued QH!
                                      Founder of the High Maintenance Horses Clique

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by AJHorsey View Post
                                        So....
                                        What is your secret to getting both sides even? I don't want someone in the hunt field to be behind me (there is always someone behind me, as my horse refuses to even be considered as the last horse in the field) and see my ugly, lopsided clip. (What happened? Were you drinking, or it your horse just lopsided?)
                                        One year I did a trace clip and used a saddle pad to get semi- even. Then proceeded to do a full body because, well, it looked like I'd been drinking, LOL! (Doesn't help that horse is very tickle-ish and hates standing still at any time, much less for an hour of clipping!)
                                        Use masking tape or a use contractors chalk line. There may be other methods too.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X