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    Original Poster

    #41
    Originally posted by candyappy View Post
    Most horses do not like to pee where it will splash up on them. Is there some medical issue related to using diuretics that started this issue for you? My mares are dry lotted at night and they pee in the hay they don't eat because it eliminates splatter.

    I suggest putting a deep layer of sand ( contained by 2x4's or landscaping poles) in a corner of his paddock , put a few piles of poop in there ( new every day maybe even from another horse to encourage marking his territory ) so he will go investigate and keep him out there for a while with no access to the stall and see what happens.

    It really sounds like your biggest problem is his urinary output and maybe not near enough bedding.
    I am going to go for shavings outside. I personally have been taught that sand is a risk for colic. But shavings will allow for the same result in theory.
    Originally posted by Equkelly;n10679061

    Jeez now I know why COTH has a reputation of being a bunch of overaged mean girls.

    Comment


      #42
      Originally posted by Fellbutbackup View Post

      I am going to go for shavings outside. I personally have been taught that sand is a risk for colic. But shavings will allow for the same result in theory.
      It will. Sand is just more easily contained and is usually not a health problem if they are not eating off it. But if you can use the poles to keep the shavings deep and in place it will probably work just as well..

      Comment

        Original Poster

        #43
        Originally posted by candyappy View Post

        It will. Sand is just more easily contained and is usually not a health problem if they are not eating off it. But if you can use the poles to keep the shavings deep and in place it will probably work just as well..
        Or alternatively, I was thinking of just taking his stall shavings away and putting cedar ones outside. Do you have experience with that? Then he would have to go back to the outside to urinate. And after a month maybe the habit will establish and we can return the shavings.
        Originally posted by Equkelly;n10679061

        Jeez now I know why COTH has a reputation of being a bunch of overaged mean girls.

        Comment


          #44
          Originally posted by Fellbutbackup View Post

          Or alternatively, I was thinking of just taking his stall shavings away and putting cedar ones outside. Do you have experience with that? Then he would have to go back to the outside to urinate. And after a month maybe the habit will establish and we can return the shavings.
          I have successfully used straw to get horses to pee outside.

          Comment


            #45
            This thread got me re-wondering why grey horses always roll in pee. You can tell when a horse of any color gets in it, but why are greys so bad about it?
            Last edited by TheMoo; Jun. 22, 2020, 07:24 PM.

            Comment

              Original Poster

              #46
              Originally posted by Incantation View Post

              I have successfully used straw to get horses to pee outside.
              That is great! What was the process that worked for you?
              Originally posted by Equkelly;n10679061

              Jeez now I know why COTH has a reputation of being a bunch of overaged mean girls.

              Comment


                #47
                Originally posted by Fellbutbackup View Post

                Or alternatively, I was thinking of just taking his stall shavings away and putting cedar ones outside. Do you have experience with that? Then he would have to go back to the outside to urinate. And after a month maybe the habit will establish and we can return the shavings.
                Is the horse stalled overnight? Or out 24/7?

                If stalled, I certainly wouldn't take away shavings. Since you say the horse doesn't lie down outside I can only assume he sleeps in his stall. So, the stall needs to be bedded, and probably bedded deeply enough he can pee and lie in there like a horse. Because that's what horses do.

                You can try to "train" them not to pee in their stalls but I'm not sure it will be worth the time and effort. My horses go in and pee every time I put in new bedding. As a former boarder used to say "everyone likes a clean bathroom."

                You still haven't answered now deeply the stall is bedded -- maybe it just needs more?



                Comment


                  #48
                  Originally posted by TheMoo View Post
                  This thread got me re-wondering why grey horses always roll in pee. You can tell when a horse of any color gets in it, but why are greys so bad about it?
                  Not proven but my educated guess it that horses are prey. A light colored horse is more easily spotted in the wild, increases his chances of being picked off by a predator. Just like horses that roll right after a bath ( to smell like dirt and not alert predators), I venture it is an evolutionary to disguise themselves, much like rolling disguises the scent.
                  Come to the dark side, we have cookies

                  Comment


                    #49
                    I call my horse Pig Pony for a reason.
                    He is a grey .

                    He is a pig in the stall and he pees and poops when ever he gets the urge. He sleeps wherever he wants and if there is pee or poop there, oh well.

                    They are out in the day and up at night and he will pee as soon as he comes in , mostly I think to mark his territory.

                    He usually avoids peeing and pooping in his hay, but if he thinks the hay is beneath his exacting standards he will poop in the leftovers.

                    He does occasionally get urine and manure stains but I don't care unless he gets them on his face . And he does, because he doesn't mind manure for a pillow.


                    I do clean that up as best as I can. I ignore the other stains. If its winter , they'll all come out when he sheds. If its summer they come out a lot easier since the hair is so short.

                    I dont bathe my horse a lot .
                    In the winter I put on his magic blanket
                    Somehow no matter how dirty he is , when I take his blanket off, he's clean! It's a miracle!
                    First Moses, and now this!

                    In the summer, if hes really sweaty , I'll hose him off lightly but i dont use shampoo
                    I do sponge him and give him a vetrolin bath. And put him in front of a fan until hes dry. I rinse him sparingly because I don't want his hooves getting too soft.

                    He rolls a lot but in summer it's mostly grass, and the roll spot in his pasture is sandy. Grass stains dont bother me.

                    I have to say, I've never had any trainer yell at me about my stinky pig pony.

                    His urine stains dont smell any more so when he sweats. They just smell like urine.

                    I've used baby wipes to clean his face when it gets nasty. They have glycerin and no alcohol
                    I make sure I get the fragrance free type. I also by the extra large packs because they are great for all kinds of things around the barn.

                    Great for wiping out sweaty helmets, sweat on my face , cleaning my hands, wiping down tack. . Wiping around his eyes and cleaning inside his ears.
                    Wiping his sheath and under his tail.
                    I keep the ones that are used but not dirty and use them to apply fly spray around the eyes and ears.

                    Great invention. I always keep plenty on hand.

                    As for the trainer , take a clothes pin to the barn and if she complains give it to her and say
                    "Here, this for your nose. Problem solved."

                    Certified Guacophobe

                    Comment


                      #50
                      Originally posted by Fellbutbackup View Post

                      Or alternatively, I was thinking of just taking his stall shavings away and putting cedar ones outside. Do you have experience with that? Then he would have to go back to the outside to urinate. And after a month maybe the habit will establish and we can return the shavings.
                      You could try that. My horses are on a dry lot at night and have a big lean -to for shade/ shelter but no bedding to lay on. They just lay down in the dry lot dirt.

                      If the stall mats are thick it should give him enough cushion, but if he still urinates in there it will be slick and he risks slipping and well if he lays down in a pee puddle your issues are way worse

                      Comment

                        Original Poster

                        #51
                        Originally posted by AnastasiaBeaverhousen View Post
                        I call my horse Pig Pony for a reason.
                        He is a grey .

                        He is a pig in the stall and he pees and poops when ever he gets the urge. He sleeps wherever he wants and if there is pee or poop there, oh well.

                        They are out in the day and up at night and he will pee as soon as he comes in , mostly I think to mark his territory.

                        He usually avoids peeing and pooping in his hay, but if he thinks the hay is beneath his exacting standards he will poop in the leftovers.

                        He does occasionally get urine and manure stains but I don't care unless he gets them on his face . And he does, because he doesn't mind manure for a pillow.


                        I do clean that up as best as I can. I ignore the other stains. If its winter , they'll all come out when he sheds. If its summer they come out a lot easier since the hair is so short.

                        I dont bathe my horse a lot .
                        In the winter I put on his magic blanket
                        Somehow no matter how dirty he is , when I take his blanket off, he's clean! It's a miracle!
                        First Moses, and now this!

                        In the summer, if hes really sweaty , I'll hose him off lightly but i dont use shampoo
                        I do sponge him and give him a vetrolin bath. And put him in front of a fan until hes dry. I rinse him sparingly because I don't want his hooves getting too soft.

                        He rolls a lot but in summer it's mostly grass, and the roll spot in his pasture is sandy. Grass stains dont bother me.

                        I have to say, I've never had any trainer yell at me about my stinky pig pony.

                        His urine stains dont smell any more so when he sweats. They just smell like urine.

                        I've used baby wipes to clean his face when it gets nasty. They have glycerin and no alcohol
                        I make sure I get the fragrance free type. I also by the extra large packs because they are great for all kinds of things around the barn.

                        Great for wiping out sweaty helmets, sweat on my face , cleaning my hands, wiping down tack. . Wiping around his eyes and cleaning inside his ears.
                        Wiping his sheath and under his tail.
                        I keep the ones that are used but not dirty and use them to apply fly spray around the eyes and ears.

                        Great invention. I always keep plenty on hand.

                        As for the trainer , take a clothes pin to the barn and if she complains give it to her and say
                        "Here, this for your nose. Problem solved."
                        Lol. I guess someone does have it worse than I do.
                        Originally posted by Equkelly;n10679061

                        Jeez now I know why COTH has a reputation of being a bunch of overaged mean girls.

                        Comment


                          #52
                          One other idea for keeping his coat clean would be the Healthy HairCare Moisturizer. It comes as a concentrate that you mix with water and then spray it on their coat, brushing/wiping it in with a soft brush or cloth (although you can use it as a rinse-out moisturizer). I have found it works amazingly well at lifting residual coat scruffiness after I've curried/brushed out the main dirt/pee. Leaves the coat GLOWING and smells great (I've not used it for odor, but I would think it could help with this, too).

                          I love that you don't have to wipe/rinse it off after using, which makes it easy to use even in cold weather. Works great in the mane/tail, too. You can use it every day, and honestly I think regular use makes it harder for future dirt/stains/odor to really set in, despite the fact it doesn't make the coat slippery like Show Sheen, etc can. And because it's a concentrate, it lasts forever! This and my Tiger's Tongue groomer/scrubber have been total gamechangers for my grooming routine.

                          https://www.sstack.com/healthy-hairc...izer/p/02035C/
                          ***
                          The hardest to learn was the least complicated.

                          Comment


                            #53
                            I still didn't see how deeply the OP beds the stall.

                            I hate pee spots, so I have used two approaches. If I have an enclosed stall and mats, I lay down a LOT of shavings. Maybe six bags in a 12x12. When he pees, I don't pick it out, but cover with more shavings from another area of stall. The pee spot becomes compacted and after say five days, I completely take the pee spot out -- which is now more like a shavings pancake, and replace with a new bale of shavings. It helps to have a horse that doesn't poop in the shavings, because you have to pick out the poop carefully to avoid disturbing the pee pancake in the making.

                            If not in a stall, but in a covered pen, I still have stall mats, but only in half the pen, and thus use pellets instead of shavings. Shavings blow away. Maybe 6-8 inches of compacted pellets when it is all said and done throughout the entire stall. Most of the horses move to the back to do their business and reserve the up front near their feed, for sleeping. But if not, the depth allows most of the pee spot to drop beneath the surface. Everyday I rake the pee spot open to the air and spread the wet material to a different part of pen to dry. I then rake dried pellet dust over the former pee spot. In my 24x24, I probably use a 40lb bag of pellets every week, but in practice only need to put down 4-5 once a month.

                            Depending upon weather, and his consistent choice of spot to pee, it might not ever dry, so I completely dig that out and replace with sand, and then a layer of pellets. That might be 2-3 times a year.

                            My horse rarely has a pee or poop stain on him. Once in two years? I would rather spend my labor on the stall, than on cleaning him before a ride. I figure he is stuck living there 24x7, I should make it as nice as possible.

                            Comment


                              #54
                              My horse used to always sleep in his pee spot. He has a big 40'x40' corral and no matter where I put shavings or how many piles of shavings (I am not bedding the whole 40x40 in shavings). And yes, in the winter he would get pretty stinky.

                              He is very tidy - poops in one corner and pees in one 18"x18" spot. Even when I would give him other piles of shavings he would lay down in the pee spot. I started using pellets in the pee spot and shavings in another area where he sometimes would roll. Now he mostly sleeps in the shavings and pees in the pellets. I guess the pellets aren't as comfortable.
                              "So relax! Let's have some fun out here! This game's fun, OK? Fun goddamnit." Crash Davis; Bull Durham

                              Comment

                                Original Poster

                                #55
                                Originally posted by MissAriel View Post
                                My horse used to always sleep in his pee spot. He has a big 40'x40' corral and no matter where I put shavings or how many piles of shavings (I am not bedding the whole 40x40 in shavings). And yes, in the winter he would get pretty stinky.

                                He is very tidy - poops in one corner and pees in one 18"x18" spot. Even when I would give him other piles of shavings he would lay down in the pee spot. I started using pellets in the pee spot and shavings in another area where he sometimes would roll. Now he mostly sleeps in the shavings and pees in the pellets. I guess the pellets aren't as comfortable.
                                Thank you for this!

                                And to everyone else that has responded lately.
                                Originally posted by Equkelly;n10679061

                                Jeez now I know why COTH has a reputation of being a bunch of overaged mean girls.

                                Comment


                                  #56
                                  Originally posted by BlueDrifter View Post
                                  I still didn't see how deeply the OP beds the stall.
                                  No, for some reason she refuses to answer this question. Which makes me think that is probably why the horse smells like urine.

                                  Comment


                                    #57
                                    Originally posted by Fellbutbackup View Post

                                    That is great! What was the process that worked for you?
                                    My guys have run in stalls, with some of the dividers out, so they can't get trapped by the other horse. There is only bedding in the stalls if they are locked in for any reason. Otherwise, I put any straw and any hay they discard in a pile outside. They use it as a pee spot, since there is no splashing. I have found it works better for me than shavings because it stays put and doesn't just blow away (we tend to get a lot of wind).

                                    Comment


                                      #58
                                      Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                                      No, for some reason she refuses to answer this question. Which makes me think that is probably why the horse smells like urine.
                                      Yep... I also knew a few piggies that once their stalls were bedded deep enough stopped being piggies.
                                      Boyle Heights Kid 1998 16.1h OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
                                      Quiet Miracle 2010 16.1h OTTB Bay Gelding
                                      "Once you go off track, you never go back!"

                                      Comment

                                        Original Poster

                                        #59
                                        Originally posted by Incantation View Post

                                        My guys have run in stalls, with some of the dividers out, so they can't get trapped by the other horse. There is only bedding in the stalls if they are locked in for any reason. Otherwise, I put any straw and any hay they discard in a pile outside. They use it as a pee spot, since there is no splashing. I have found it works better for me than shavings because it stays put and doesn't just blow away (we tend to get a lot of wind).
                                        Thanks. How often do you end up digging out the pee spot outside, if ever?
                                        Originally posted by Equkelly;n10679061

                                        Jeez now I know why COTH has a reputation of being a bunch of overaged mean girls.

                                        Comment


                                          #60
                                          Originally posted by Fellbutbackup View Post

                                          Thanks. How often do you end up digging out the pee spot outside, if ever?
                                          It is on a well draining base, so I just remove the soiled hay/straw and replace.

                                          Comment

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