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Retirement Failure WWYD

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  • #21
    The hope you can locate a retirement setting that offers what the better farms do, and what I do for my retirees and boarders: show stable treatment with no amenities! My two currently are on 24/7 come-and-go style living with fully bedded stalls and mud-free paddocks at night, paddocks/overhang/pasture access during the day. Grooming, customized feed and supplements, fly control, etc. I have no wash rack, riding areas, tack room etc. just a barn and quality care.

    Use your local riding association, trainers, fellow riders, FB groups-- anything to network and find that perfect spot. My current boarder sounds very much like your horse and there's no way he'd survive in a pasture board situation. He has transitioned to barefoot, but summer is hell for him: Cushings, no heat tolerance, loathes insects, hates long pasture stints, but kicks when stalled...he's a puzzle!!

    I sometimes wish I had a much bigger farm as it's clear retirement board is a growing industry! I get so many inquiries from friends regarding it.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

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    • #22
      I have my horse at a facility just north of Paso Robles. Person is very hands on, but I don’t think it’s cheap for new people. Terri Eadens horse retirement. She has successfully transitioned many show horses.

      Another friend has a horse at a place in Waterford - https://www.lonetreefarm.net/retirement

      It does seem like many of the facilities in California are in the hotter, more fly prone, portions of the state.

      There’s no shame in euthanasia.

      PM me if you have questions. I looked at a couple of places when I retired my horse.
      The Evil Chem Prof

      Comment


      • #23
        I'd try to do some networking. Perhaps on local Facebook groups and see what you uncover. I feel like I always see people on here looking for or thinking about a low key (as in not in work or aggressive) companion for their horses at home. There may be someone with a small backyard barn/farmette out there. Just have to find them.

        A lot of places here don't have an internet presence, but I've seen a lot of networking or referring in some of our small Facebook groups. However, I feel like there are a lot of people with small stables in their backyards. So it depends on your location.
        ​​​​​​
        Since the horse is retired, you can also think outside the box. Maybe a western stable has a good set up but you didn't consider it before due to it not being your chosen discipline. I don't know if that is the case, just an example.

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        • #24
          Why do people always think "retirement" means throwing a horse out on 24/7 turnout with minimal handling?

          My retirees still live like show horses. It's what they are used to. It's how they have lived all their life. Why upset the apple cart changing it now?

          Comment


          • #25
            OP, I feel your pain, and I know this is not what you want to hear, but sometimes it is kinder to send them over the Bridge. It is an inevitable fate and I think with many of these "special needs" horses, it is not worth jeopardizing their health or safety by prolonging the decision.

            I just went through this with my cherished dressage horse. He had (mild) kissing spines, repeated bouts of EPM every fall/winter, stomach ulcers, and spring allergies so bad he would become a violent head flinger. We were able to manage everything with lots of vet care and appropriate meds and he was a fun and reliable and fancy riding horse (he was schooling GP), but his recent bout of EPM left him more ataxic behind than ever before. He had always responded well to EPM treatment but this time didn't seem to be recovering as quickly. Sometime in Nov or Dec, he managed to herniate a disc at L6/S1--we believe he did it struggling to get up in his stall--which meant the end of his riding career (it was a moderately severe herniation).

            I couldn't afford to keep him at the same barn as a retiree (hugely expensive there), and he was too much of a special snowflake to move elsewhere. He was claustrophobic so couldn't be kept in an enclosed stall, he went a bit nuts in strange stabling (worked himself into a colic several times at shows), he was a bully in the pasture, he HATED flies, he had been groomed every day his entire adult life, he needed shoes in front to keep his quarter cracks in check, he couldn't have some vax due his compromised immune system (we believe the Vetera Gold he was mistakenly given in October triggered the last EPM flare). Add in the fact that he needed experienced handlers because although he wasn't mean or vicious at all, he was a big powerful warmblood with a very strong sense of self and he could get a bit difficult to handle if he got really worked up about something (he liked to think he was the 3 y/o stallion he once was).

            He had been at the same barn for eight years and they did a great job managing him but I couldn't justify keeping him there as a retiree because of the cost. And I couldn't send him elsewhere because I was afraid that he would immediately stress himself into a colic and/or hurt someone or himself having a meltdown. My truly BIGGEST fear was that he would suffer a horrific injury (no matter where he was) because the EPM and herniated disc affected his ability at times to use his hind end effectively. I didn't want him to suffer and I knew I would never forgive myself if he had a catastrophic injury, so I had him put down last week. It was the most difficult decision I have ever had to make—I had owned him since he was 3 months old and he would have been 17 years old today, and although my heart is broken, my head knows it was the right thing to do. He grazed happily in the sun until the sedation and left this world quietly and peacefully.

            I know your situation is different in that your horse isn’t ataxic, but I wanted to share my story so you would know others have also had to make decisions about “special needs” horses. I wish you peace of mind as you decide what is best for you and your horse.
            Last edited by DownYonder; Feb. 14, 2020, 11:02 AM.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by SweetMutt View Post

              This is very possible, but man, I'm having a heck of a time finding them.

              Jarrn I'm in the bay area, nothing cheap about it. The retired horses I know are either kept as pets in similar situations to his, where owners either don't ride or have the means to keep a few on the payroll, or they're sent inland or out of state. After two bad experiences I'm really hesitant for him to go too far for me to intervene if necessary.

              I guess I could look into buying an acre or two for us all to live on.
              Definitely further away than I thought.

              What about the Davis area? Tons of different options there, relatively cheap (compared to the bay area I would assume, although I don't know your budget), and not that far from the bay area.
              Lots of things you could do with a stopwatch...

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #27
                Thank you all for the additional insights and recommendations. I would choose euthanasia over putting him in an uncertain situation, so that consideration is in the mix. I just don't quite feel like I've done all I can (close to it, though) or that he's uncomfortable enough to for me to feel like it's time. I do know the day will come when at least one of those is true. Adding in Equioxx has already given me pause about his quality of life if he needs daily painkillers, so that day could come sooner rather than later.

                I'll keep watching my network in case the perfect situation comes up. I suspect my location is a greater challenge than others, as we don't have a ton of backyard barns - certainly some, just maybe not as many as elsewhere - and the flies become a big problem away from the coast. Meanwhile, he's in the best situation for him, and it's hard to feel bad about that.

                Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                Why do people always think "retirement" means throwing a horse out on 24/7 turnout with minimal handling?
                I have started asking myself this question throughout this process. Most of the retirees I know live the pasture life without issue, so I just kinda figured he would too when the time came. I will have a very different perspective on this in the future.
                If the pony spits venom in your face or produces a loud roar, it is probably not a pony. Find another. -The Oatmeal

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                  Why do people always think "retirement" means throwing a horse out on 24/7 turnout with minimal handling?

                  My retirees still live like show horses. It's what they are used to. It's how they have lived all their life. Why upset the apple cart changing it now?
                  Well.... where I live .... a lot of the cost of boarding in a "show" type facility is having an indoor arena to use, and the insurance that the barn owner must carry because people ride their horses, land costs/taxes, and labor costs. That's running $1000+ per month in my area (north of Boston). The cost comes down if one heads a little further away, especially to New Hampshire, but still....

                  What a lot of people want, and what I would want when I retire my mare, is something in between. E.g. she probably shouldn't be out on pasture, as she is an aging easy-keeper Morgan prone to weight gain who gets sore-footed on rich food. She may need to not be out with other horses, because she is food aggressive and kicks like a banshee if any horse gets near her rear end. But she panics if left alone without other horses in sight. She's a very good "over the fence" neighbor and in fact has been an excellent "babysitter" for rehabbing horses in the medical paddock right next to hers. To people, she is sweet-natured and easy to handle. Vets and farriers love her. In my perfect world, she'd get a shed or stall with 24/7 access to a dry lot run, and other horses around, but that's not necessarily easy to find in my neck of the woods.

                  So that is the dilemma... we are not there yet, but she's requiring a lot of maintenance to keep sound enough for light work in an arena and trail riding. And yes, there are people who keep their retired horses "in the manner to which they are accustomed" but the cost.... E.g. someone I know has 4 retired or mostly retired horses at a $1200/month barn. She can afford that... but that's a huge chunk of change before you even think about the farrier/trimmer, vet, etc.
                  You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                  1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Jarrn View Post

                    Definitely further away than I thought.

                    What about the Davis area? Tons of different options there, relatively cheap (compared to the bay area I would assume, although I don't know your budget), and not that far from the bay area.
                    I am in the Davis area, and really would not recommend it for retirement board. Heck, there's a surprising dearth of quality boarding, period. I figured out how to keep my horses at home because I couldn't handle the care, even at one of the top barns in the area. I have friends who are in various barns and just marvel at the care they are (not) getting for what they pay.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by barnesthenoble View Post

                      I am in the Davis area, and really would not recommend it for retirement board. Heck, there's a surprising dearth of quality boarding, period. I figured out how to keep my horses at home because I couldn't handle the care, even at one of the top barns in the area. I have friends who are in various barns and just marvel at the care they are (not) getting for what they pay.
                      I've definitely seen both - places I wouldn't even step foot in and places I would have no issue pasture-boarding my horses at. I've heard good things about this place (horsequartersstable.com) but I've never been there so I couldn't say for sure. But again, I'm in SoCal, so maybe my standards for a place with any sort of pasture is low
                      Lots of things you could do with a stopwatch...

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                        Why do people always think "retirement" means throwing a horse out on 24/7 turnout with minimal handling?

                        My retirees still live like show horses. It's what they are used to. It's how they have lived all their life. Why upset the apple cart changing it now?
                        Agreed, but there must be alternatives and probably some of them are unadvertised. Ask around - ask farriers, vets, etct. I have my horses at home and for a time I had a boarder or two. I have had a retiree before. It's much more than throwing them out 24/7 in a field, but far less than heated washstalls and an indoor arena.

                        That said, it's not super cheap. My time is valuable, so if grooming, blanketing, stalling, etc. are necessary, it's going to be more than....whatever 24/7 field board costs. I don't really know what field board costs in my area.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Ask your vet for recommendations. She knows your horse, and the kind of care he needs. She also knows all/most of the area barns and the type and quality of care they provide.
                          https://www.facebook.com/SugarMapleFarm
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                          • #33
                            Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                            Why do people always think "retirement" means throwing a horse out on 24/7 turnout with minimal handling?

                            My retirees still live like show horses. It's what they are used to. It's how they have lived all their life. Why upset the apple cart changing it now?
                            While that would be ideal, not everyone can afford to keep a retired horse at a high-end barn. For instance, many high-end training barns with a resident trainer charge a single VERY high monthly rate that includes training and lesson fees in addition to board and care. They generally prefer to fill their stalls with training horses that will increase the visibility of the training program, and they do not give discounts to horses not in the program. That in itself effectively encourages owners of retirees to look for other situations that are more affordable. Other high-end training barns where the training and lesson fees are “add-ons” often ask horses not in the program to leave, so they can fill the stall with a horse that will generate extra income for the trainer.

                            Owners of retirees ask themselves--how much am I willing to spend each month to keep a retiree? $1000? $2000? $3000? (Yes, those are real figures for monthly fees for high-end barns—and then you have to add in costs for farrier, vet, supplements, etc., etc.). While many folks can justify dedicating a significant amount of funds each month to keep a RIDING horse, they are not wealthy and it becomes an agonizing financial decision when faced with permanently retiring a horse. It is especially challenging when the owner wants to keep riding and is looking to obtain another horse. And even more difficult when the decision involves a “special needs” horse. I say kudos to those owners like the OP who are looking for affordable and trustworthy options for their retiree instead of just shipping it off to an unknown fate.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              My late OTTB was retired from the age of 9 to when he died at 25. Your horse sounds a lot like mine.

                              HE thought he was a wild mustang stallion running free but in reality he required daily fly spray, got huge welts from tick bites, needed blanketing in winter, and eventually he ate 8 lbs of TC senior plus another 3 lbs of hay stretcher per day, soaked, because of declining dental health (EOTRH). I did manage to get him to live out 24/7 with a shed, eventually, though I do think he missed having a stall. He used to take long, snoring, naps in his stall. He did love lying in the sun taking naps outside though. I also managed to transition him to barefoot, which was a challenge since his feet were the soundness issue. I'm sure he would have been MORE comfortable with eggbars and wedge pads, but his hooves did toughen over time and he was pasture sound barefoot, so that's the direction I went. He was still willing to rocket around his paddock and field like a crazy man on an almost daily basis so I figured he was fine.

                              Good luck. How far inland do you have to go to find a cheaper, but full care place that maybe doesn't have all the amenities as a "facility?" I wouldn't hesitate if it was an hour.

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                              • Original Poster

                                #35
                                Originally posted by Ruth0552 View Post
                                Good luck. How far inland do you have to go to find a cheaper, but full care place that maybe doesn't have all the amenities as a "facility?" I wouldn't hesitate if it was an hour.
                                The hard thing with the barns in the central valley is the flies. How bad they are can vary property to property, how many horses they have, whether they do anything about pasture manure, other livestock nearby (lots of cattle out there), etc.

                                Signs of his discomfort from the KS are becoming more apparent as time goes on, so it's possible he doesn't have much time left of a very good quality of life anyway. Might be best for him and my conscience to just let him live it out where he is.
                                If the pony spits venom in your face or produces a loud roar, it is probably not a pony. Find another. -The Oatmeal

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by DownYonder View Post

                                  While many folks can justify dedicating a significant amount of funds each month to keep a RIDING horse, they are not wealthy and it becomes an agonizing financial decision when faced with permanently retiring a horse. It is especially challenging when the owner wants to keep riding and is looking to obtain another horse. And even more difficult when the decision involves a “special needs” horse. I say kudos to those owners like the OP who are looking for affordable and trustworthy options for their retiree instead of just shipping it off to an unknown fate.
                                  This is really the crux of retiring a riding horse when one is not wealthy. It's one thing when it's a main hobby you are doing multiple times a week, it's still a large expense but justifiable. My horse has been retired for 2.5 years now. I'm keeping him as inexpensively as I can but it's still $400 a month on a large pet I see once a week. On the one hand I feel guilty thinking I really don't want to keep spending that money, on the other hand, I spent it when he was in service to me so he deserves a nice retirement. I guess at this point in his life, at 28 years old, I feel comfortable saying to myself I've done right by him. He can keep on keeping on at his current level of maintenance but when he inevitably starts to get higher maintenance, it's going to be his time.

                                  So yes, kudos for trying OP. I think at some point it's totally fine to say ok, this is enough but obviously only you know what that point is and sounds like you aren't there yt.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Cost?

                                    Isn't that part of owning, and keeping, a horse.

                                    What I'm hearing is all are willing to skimp on the horse that's performed for them for years, in order to pamper the replacement.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                                      Cost?

                                      Isn't that part of owning, and keeping, a horse.

                                      What I'm hearing is all are willing to skimp on the horse that's performed for them for years, in order to pamper the replacement.
                                      Well aren't you judgey today!

                                      Should I retire my mare, here are a few things at her current barn we would not need: indoor arena (any arena really), BO carrying insurance that allows riding, impeccably clean barn. That alone will bring down the boarding bill at least 33%, possibly more, and just moving her from MA to NH would be another big drop in costs. There are some other costs, things I am doing only to keep her rideable, that would also go away. I love the barn where she is, but there are (much) less expensive alternatives more suitable for a retired horse.

                                      A second horse would be doable if I stretched.
                                      You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                                      1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                                        Cost?

                                        Isn't that part of owning, and keeping, a horse.

                                        What I'm hearing is all are willing to skimp on the horse that's performed for them for years, in order to pamper the replacement.
                                        Gosh, I own a retirement farm and I don't think anyone is obligated to put a strain on their finances for a retired horse. Some people choose to do that (or can simply afford it without strain), but it does not mean everyone must. In an ideal world horses wouldn't have such longevity after their working years and be so expensive to maintain, thus making retirement an easier choice. None of us has to think so hard about helping our aging cats/dogs because we aren't already paying hundreds to thousands per month for just their housing. Unfortunately, most of us live in the real world and not the ideal world.

                                        I do wish more people would euthanize rather than give away their aged horse to a "forever home" if retiring them isn't financially viable. If the person who used up the horse's best years doesn't want to tote the note in their senior years it's not realistic that someone else will do it. Often they will for a year or two, then it all goes south.
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                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by scrbear11 View Post
                                          Cost?

                                          Isn't that part of owning, and keeping, a horse.

                                          What I'm hearing is all are willing to skimp on the horse that's performed for them for years, in order to pamper the replacement.
                                          I'm guessing you are a trust fund baby since you don't seem to understand that some folks just cannot afford to keep paying THOUSANDS each month to keep a retiree in the style to which it has become accustomed.

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