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Can you review my rehab plan for underweight OTTB rescue? Also, best antifungal spray or shampoo?

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  • Can you review my rehab plan for underweight OTTB rescue? Also, best antifungal spray or shampoo?

    Over the weekend I picked up an underweight OTTB. The poor guy is in poor shape. I am calling the vet this morning to schedule an exam. I am going to have a fecal done, a full health exam, and have his teeth checked. I have come up with a plan for rehabbing him nutritionally, but want some input while I am waiting for the vet to come out. I know my vet will give me a good plan, but in the meantime, wanted to get some of the wisdom of COTH so I can run more ideas by my vet when he comes out. Should I go ahead and have him scoped for ulcers, or should I just go ahead and have the vet treat him as if he has them? I imagine being in this poor of condition that he has a high likelihood of having developed them.

    So, he was currently on 1 scoop of the cheapest 12% sweet feed you could find 2x a day, and a round bale of coastal (no grass).

    I am very slowly going to be switching him over to his new diet. I do NOT want to cause refeeding syndrome, so I am going extremely slowly. But the ultimate plan is this:

    1.5 scoops Tribute Kalm Ultra 2x a day
    1/2 cup flax seed 1x a day
    CocoSoya Supreme Oil (recommended daily dose)
    Alfalfa (waiting on vet to see how much to work him up to a day)
    All you can eat coastal (which I have already started, so he has something in front of him at all times)

    And of course, I will evaluate and re-evaluate as we go along. Thanks in advance for any advice! I couldn't let this guy stay where he was.

    He also has some serious crud going on on his back legs and at the top of his hindquarters. In your experience, what is the best anti-fungal shampoo or spray out there to help get rid of fungus? I believe its rain rot but will have my vet take a look at it while he is out.
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  • Original Poster

    #2
    Another picture of him

    Comment


    • #3
      Any idea how long he's been that thin? I'm going to assume he's thinner than he looks, assuming some hair is hiding some boniness.

      To that end, I would start with only hay. The alfalfa is great, and the goal is to work up to free choice alfalfa, starting with small amounts several times a day. The fact that he's been eating hay is good, but if you can phase out the Coastal - it's just not the best hay for many reasons - even better. If it's really the only good hay you can get reliably, then if you can at least mix in 20-30% alfalfa long-term, that will help a lot. That goes for all horses - straight Coastal is raising the risk of an ileal impaction, and mixing in other coarser hays lowers that risk.

      Only after he's on a good amount of alfalfa (free choice is great, but 50% is fine), then start adding in ONE feed. Don't throw a bunch of things at once. The KU is fine.

      Give him a couple weeks between adding things.

      Not knowing what size scoop you have, just make sure you work up to at least the minimum recommended amount based on his ideal weight. Then calculate how much vitamin E is in that amount, and if you're under 2IU/lb body weight, add whatever is necessary to get to that point.

      I haven't used it but hear fantastic things about Equiderma for all sorts of skin conditions. MicroTek has a skin crud spray as well. If there's a warm enough day, which can be 50* against the sunny side of a barn, a good bath with a shampoo with either some betadine mixed in, or contains some, or contains some tea tree oil, would be a good start, then manage with topicals from there.

      An improved diet will also start helping the skin crud, but the above will help faster.
      ______________________________
      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

      Comment


      • #4
        Seeing the 2nd picture now, while I was typing above, he doesn't look tooooo awful. I still think the hay-only place is a good place to start. By adding in some alfalfa to the Coastal, you're already going to be improving things from a nutritional and calorie perspective.
        ______________________________
        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd consider the UCDavis refeeding protocol:

          https://thehorse.com/118016/nutritio...starved-horse/

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Okay great. The reason I have coastal at the moment is that was what he was used to getting. So, knowing I need to work him up to the free choice alfalfa, and I only have a dry lot at the moment, I wanted something in front of him 24/7 while I work up to pure alfalfa. I don't like coastal, but again, I knew I couldn't throw feed at him immediately and I didn't want him standing around not getting anything but a flake of alfalfa twice a day. I'm afraid of changing things so quickly that I will get a colic or the like.

            I really appreciate the help. He has thick fur, so it is hiding some of his boniness. I have definitely gotten way worse rehabs in, so he's not the worst I have ever had to rehab but he definitely needs some weight, and a fair amount of it. His coat is also very dull.

            I want to do a trace clip on him but I'm not sure if I should. I do have medium weight and heavy weight blankets for him that I picked up for him. I live in Florida and he looks like he is getting ready for a Minnesota winter. The lows have been (at the lowest) in the 60s overnight, and it gets up in the 80s during the day (sometimes the 90s!). His chest was pretty sweaty yesterday just standing around in the pasture. Thoughts? It wouldn't hurt to do a trace clip as long as I blanket him if we get a cold, cold snap, right?

            Comment


            • #7
              Great! Weaning off the Coastal while you ramp up the alfalfa is perfect, and then you can start adding in whatever your normal hay is.

              I agree that starting some clipping would help. You can do a clip with the hair instead of against it so you're lightening it without going Summer-short. Or, if you really expect temps to stay in the 80s, a full clip could be done. I can't imagine you'd ever need a heavy weight blanket there. Medium should be fine, especially if you do a full clip now, as he'll grow some hair back by the time I assume you'd get "cold".

              You can always take more off Having his skin/coat exposed to air as much as possible will help his skin crud, so while you can still heal him with blankets on, air will do a lot of great work too.
              ______________________________
              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

              Comment


              • #8
                With him needing so much weight, I'd be hesitant to remove anything that helps keep him warm with winter coming until he's at a better weight. I would at most do a bib clip, but I mean, my mare is full-clipped and has still been a bit sweaty on these 80-degree days here in Florida. It is what it is. You must be further south than me, in Ocala we've had a couple nights the last few weeks in the low-low 50s almost high 40s.
                Last edited by mmeqcenter; Nov. 11, 2019, 12:41 PM.
                Custom tack racks!
                www.mmeqcenter.com/tacklove.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  For the rainrot/crud.. Get some chlorhexidene solution, Put in spray bottle. If no rain in sight dilute according to directions spray on and leave it. If rain is coming, use it undiluted.

                  You can also use the chlorhexidene scrub. But you must rinse it off.

                  Both are inexpensive, really, in gallon containers. Usually found at Tractor Supply or any other livestock selling source.
                  Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                  Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    WildLittleWren JB Simkie

                    Serious question here, re rescues. I've read the refeeding protocol, seen some gnarly cases thru ASPCA, and dealt with one (about same shape as above) myself.

                    Something I saw that nobody mentions much - hydrating the intestinal tract. Some of these guys are so compromised that throwing hay at them, they just can't do it. It ends up killing them. So, when I was dealing with mine, his diet was (at first) a good mash (soaked hay pellets with a little salt in them) just to make sure he could deal with that first. We progressed from there.

                    Anyway, thoughts???

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by Obsidian Fire View Post
                      WildLittleWren JB Simkie

                      Serious question here, re rescues. I've read the refeeding protocol, seen some gnarly cases thru ASPCA, and dealt with one (about same shape as above) myself.

                      Something I saw that nobody mentions much - hydrating the intestinal tract. Some of these guys are so compromised that throwing hay at them, they just can't do it. It ends up killing them. So, when I was dealing with mine, his diet was (at first) a good mash (soaked hay pellets with a little salt in them) just to make sure he could deal with that first. We progressed from there.

                      Anyway, thoughts???
                      Yes and another question. The lady dumped apple electrolytes into this horse's water everyday. He doesn't seem to be drinking nearly enough. At least, not what I'm used to seeing a horse drink. I have loose mineral salt out. Should I also put some electrolytes in his feed or water?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by WildLittleWren View Post

                        Yes and another question. The lady dumped apple electrolytes into this horse's water everyday. He doesn't seem to be drinking nearly enough. At least, not what I'm used to seeing a horse drink. I have loose mineral salt out. Should I also put some electrolytes in his feed or water?
                        If he was mine I'd feed him mash, add some plain salt to it maybe, but that's all. Plain water probably tastes weird to him at this point!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In Central Florida also: I would not clip this horse at this time. Usually we start getting nights in the 30's and low 40's at night in December, and due to cold fronts coming south the days can get quite chilly also.

                          He will need that extra coat if he's weight and nutritionally compromised. And just like people, skinny and in poor shape feel the cold more due to not having fat to insulate them.

                          Equiderma lotion is great for skin conditions and rain rot. Most tack shops here carry it.

                          So glad you're helping the poor guy. What do you plan to do with him?
                          "There is no fundamental difference between man and animals in their ability to feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery." - Charles Darwin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Obsidian Fire View Post
                            WildLittleWren JB Simkie

                            Serious question here, re rescues. I've read the refeeding protocol, seen some gnarly cases thru ASPCA, and dealt with one (about same shape as above) myself.

                            Something I saw that nobody mentions much - hydrating the intestinal tract. Some of these guys are so compromised that throwing hay at them, they just can't do it. It ends up killing them. So, when I was dealing with mine, his diet was (at first) a good mash (soaked hay pellets with a little salt in them) just to make sure he could deal with that first. We progressed from there.

                            Anyway, thoughts???
                            More water is never a bad idea. The good thing going for this horse is that he's already been eating hay and some grain (granted, crappy grain). Feeding soaked feed, especially when it's hay pellets or cubes, never hurts though. And it never hurts this time of year when water consumption can start to taper off.

                            I'd go for a little added salt first, before e-lytes, and see what happens. Sometimes e-lytes encourage more drinking than just salt. Not all horses like salt in their feed, so it's trial and error. Of my 4, 1 doesn't like any in there, but he happily eats out of his salt bucket so I don't worry.
                            ______________________________
                            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sugar beet pulp and a bit of oil have always been my go to for skinny horses.

                              It also helps to get water into them which is a bonus and you can make it as wet as you like.

                              I'd start with a small amount and then gradually add in. Maybe a cup of sugar beet (dry) and a 1/4 cup of oil twice or three times a day then increase as needed. Make it quite wet at first because he probably needs the liquid.

                              You could do a bib/belly clip on him to remove a tiny bit of hair where he's sweating the most. If his legs are really bad I'd be tempted to clip them so I could treat the skin more easily. I like medicated talc for skin ick because it keeps everything dry.
                              Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                You're getting great advice on the feeding but for the fungus I will highly recommend Equiderma!! That stuff is faaabulous! you just rub it on and the next day you rinse the crud away!

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Looks like I am going to buy some Equiderma after work today! I may clip his lower hind legs, because the gunk is all hidden in and within the long hair. I MIGHT clip his chest, not sure yet. He has plenty of shade in his pasture and he can go in the stall if he gets too hot. He raced for 6 years, was trained as a hunter for a year, the girl went to college, and sold him. With that person he dropped a little weight, they had him 6 months, and then they sold him to the gal I got him from. Who had no clue how to properly feed and maintain a Thoroughbred, obviously. But the good news is he's with me now, and slowly but steadily we will get him to a good place health wise.

                                  He is super sweet and quite a talker. Everytime he sees me he gives me a whole hearted whinny. He loaded great and rode great on the trailer. He THOROUGHLY enjoyed the bath he got yesterday, he was um, very relaxed (gelding owners will know what I mean!), and wanted nothing more than to have his face sprayed and to be pampered all over. He got a good spa day. I wanted to make sure to get it in before any lower temps head our way.

                                  He is quite a character, he carries one of his hay buckets to the gate and drops it when he's running low or out of hay. He knows how to untie himself. I can't wait to see him fill out and perk up more..thats when his full personality will come out! I already love him. He really is quite a sweet fellow.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I have a horse with chronic pastern dermatitis, and my favorite skin crud products are the EquiFit AgSilver line. They have one shampoo to use while trying to clear up conditions and another for maintance as well as a couple of topicals.

                                    Good on you for giving this guy an upgrade!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
                                      For the rainrot/crud.. Get some chlorhexidene solution, Put in spray bottle. If no rain in sight dilute according to directions spray on and leave it. If rain is coming, use it undiluted.

                                      You can also use the chlorhexidene scrub. But you must rinse it off.

                                      Both are inexpensive, really, in gallon containers. Usually found at Tractor Supply or any other livestock selling source.
                                      I would honestly start with this before trying any other magic ($$$) lotions and potions for crud. Most have chlorohexidine as an ingredient, but are significantly more expensive. Especially if you're dealing with a winter coat, you'll be using a lot more product to get down to the skin. The chlorohexidine concentrate, mixed with water in a spray bottle, has done away with scratches, rain rot, cannon bone junk, and trush better than any other product I've tried.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        You'll save yourself so much stress by clipping his legs. Means you can see what's going, the air can get to his skin and anything you apply isn't just soaking the hair.
                                        Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!

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