Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You're responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it--details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums' policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it's understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users' profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses -- Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it's related to a horse for sale, regardless of who's selling it, it doesn't belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions -- Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services -- Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products -- While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements -- Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be "bumped" excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues -- Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators' discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you'd rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user's membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Horse shopping: am I being too picky?!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #41
    I think it's fine to be picky as long as you're not in a hurry. I'd agree with most, or maybe all, of your criteria, including "bad feet". But what do you mean by "certain conformation"? I think there's room for some flaws in most horses as long as they're sound, and the flaw is not significant. My horse toes in and paddles. She's 11 now and I've had her for 6 years and she's never been lame, and is currently eventing at training level. Had I ruled out the slight toes in (and slight cow hocks), I would have missed out on a great horse. If she had major conformational flaws, I would have passed. I would also not have done the PPE if she wasn't sound. As a greenie, it was the personality that really hooked me. She was also in the bargain price range that horses between 14.3 and 15.2 hands find themselves in, so if your height range really does go that low, you might find what you're looking for.

    Comment

      Original Poster

      #42
      Mango20 I actually vetted a horse that toed out a bit and was a bit cowhocked. He flexed great but an x-ray of a scar on joint showed damage that my vet told me would make him a pasture pet at some point, probably 10. So I passed on him with the advice of my vet and a surgeon at the teaching hospital.

      But I don't want something that just has so many things going on that they will likely find Dressage very hard or get hurt trying to reach my goal. No horse is perfect and absolutely I'm a sucker for a good mind! But some horses would have a very hard time doing what I want and I don't want to do that to them.

      Comment


        #43
        Everyone is entitled to have whatever criteria they want when shopping for a horse. It's your money (and time and effort and heart.)

        I will say that depending on the type of horses you are looking at, I *personally* would not automatically rule out a horse I otherwise liked if they happened to be a bit footsore. For years when I was buying budget horses (all OTTBs) I learned to look past the "track trims" that weren't the best - they were often footsore on hard ground. I have a fantastic farrier and in those cases would get his opinion before making a decision. He never steered me wrong and they were all fine once they had some good foot care and proper trims. Those suckers got a lot of venice turpentine and hoof packing. Every one of them ended up being fine.

        But just because I would take a horse with that issue doesn't mean you should. It is very good to be clear about what you will and won't tolerate. Stick to your guns and be patient.
        **********
        We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
        -PaulaEdwina

        Comment


          #44
          Originally posted by Lunabear1988 View Post
          xQHDQ location might be part of it. Age range is a 9 year Gap, height 14 to 17 hands, looking at green horses of any breed and gender. But I am looking for something that can school (not compete!!) At least 3rd level so I'm definitely a little picky on conformation and soundness. The budget DOES make this harder so I agree with them on that. But I'd rather keep saving then buy something unsuitable or possibly lame.
          I get the impression you are searching online ads, correct? If so, maybe you should try a different approach.

          There are many Saddlebreds that can learn to do what you are considering, and well within your budget and the people at your local rescue will know how the horse goes and what his issues are. I've dealt a bit with my local ASB rescue, and find that they are pretty up front about the horses. They work with them to learn a "non-ASB-show" sort of life and want them to go to good landings.

          Of course I don't know where you are, and there are RESCUES, and "rescues", some good, some not so good, but it may be an avenue to consider.

          https://www.americansaddlebredsporth...arry-callahan/

          https://www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net/awards/
          Last edited by Sparrowette; Oct. 3, 2019, 11:33 AM. Reason: add second link
          “A man convinced against his will, is of the same opinion still.”

          Comment


            #45
            I was thinking about this as I was looking at ads sent to me by a friend in OP's region who's also searching.

            On the Dressage forum, OP noted that the riding (training) input that a lot of horses in the four-figure pool did not at all enhance their value. I agree! It sounded like she'd prefer a greener horse than one with training holes or bad habits to fix. Which makes perfect sense!

            But in a region where most of the breeding of horses is for western disciplines, with less of a lower budget sporthorse market, a lot of the horses that have any physical aptitude for mid-level dressage are either 5-figures, or they've been brought in from somewhere relatively far away to be ridden by another ammy, who in all likelihood rode them badly and killed their impulsion and maybe even threw some draw reins on them as a quick headset fix. The budget breeds that can be ok bets for dressage past 2nd level (the Saddlebreds, Morgans, Arabian-crosses mentioned in some of these posts as breeds to look for) just aren't thick on the ground in the region, compared to many other parts of the country. Most of the non-stock-type offbreeds you find in that region aren't greenies and have at least some training holes, if not bad habits, from their riding to date.

            I'd probably be looking at ranch bred QHs, maybe younger, really green reining stock if I were shopping for a mid-4-figure dressage horse in Colorado and didn't want to deal with training issues associated with horses being forced into frames or ridden front-to-back. Of course a really nice OTTB that hasn't been cranked down into a frame might show up one day. You might get lucky in finding a working type Morgan or a well put together Arabian in the right price range with more of a basic, western start. But it could be a long wait to find one of those breeds on OP's budget without having to fix some training issues...

            Comment

              Original Poster

              #46
              Lucassb actually the one who has had the worst feet so far was a QH. I was already worried about his feet and then second time riding he was so foot sore, couldn't get around without tripping ect. Plus some other things I wasn't thrilled about it, just sealed the deal! It's all about the whole picture though with what I'm willing to deal with.

              And a little footsore, sure. But so footsore that you can't actually see them move, is too risky for me! It really just depends on the degree. It's a balancing act for sure.

              Horses who are constantly a having an abscess scare me too. One is one thing, but I do need to see the horse move eventually...

              Comment


                #47
                Following the idea of ranch-bred QHs, I'd also watch out for "aztecas": QH x Lusitano or Andalusian crosses. Many are hardy, suitable for dressage and not very expensive.

                Comment


                  #48
                  I do think it's important to make a decision you feel good about. But I think it's also important to to figure out which things need investigating and which things don't.

                  For example, maybe you can see the horse has bad feet. But a professional might be able to tell you that it's an easy fix. The horse might have bad feet because he needs shoes and the owner hasn't put them on for whatever reason. Or the farrier is simply not very good. If a farrier I trust looks at feet and tells me it's very fixable, then I trust them. But that's the kind of thing that I do think is worth having a professional look at.

                  The horse i bought last year clearly had bad flared hooves--he was barefoot. But he also was under weight. So, I thought that with regular farrier work, good nutrition, and shoes I could fix the issue. The farrier and the PPE vet agreed. And sure enough, he has great little feet now. I did not even need to give him shoes.

                  Comment

                    Original Poster

                    #49
                    X_Halt_Salute I do like the ranch bred ones very much. I just don't know where to get one! Many I see are $15k or so which is above budget. Or sold by Auction.

                    But maybe there is somewhere with Ranch bred QH types that are a little more green and cheaper.

                    Of course a friend pointed out that she thinks I really want a Thoroughbred. Not that they happen to be in my budget, but that I LIKE them. I can't say I didn't agree

                    Comment

                      Original Poster

                      #50
                      blob99 I had a horse with horrible feet plus I thought he was ugly at first! But boy did I love that horse. I am not willing to work on some things but I think I need to like the horse enough too.

                      piedmontfields I have started looking for those types. Not many in my state but looks like some out further west.

                      Comment

                        Original Poster

                        #51
                        I will say that I'm doing a trial on a horse. Should be starting next week. I'm not without any concerns but the horse's mind seems worth it to look into him a bit more. Fingers crossed!! He's not perfect but he's a cutie with a great start.

                        Comment


                          #52
                          Lunabear1988 Good luck with the trial! Keep us posted on how it goes. 😁 I have been looking for something similar for too long now and also wonder if I’m being too picky.

                          Comment

                            Original Poster

                            #53
                            I will update. Hopefully my search is over soon IF I do find the right one

                            Comment


                              #54
                              Originally posted by Lunabear1988 View Post
                              I will say that I'm doing a trial on a horse. Should be starting next week. I'm not without any concerns but the horse's mind seems worth it to look into him a bit more. Fingers crossed!! He's not perfect but he's a cutie with a great start.
                              Glad you found a promising option and good luck with the trial!

                              Comment


                                #55
                                Originally posted by Lunabear1988 View Post
                                X_Halt_Salute I do like the ranch bred ones very much. I just don't know where to get one! Many I see are $15k or so which is above budget. Or sold by Auction.

                                But maybe there is somewhere with Ranch bred QH types that are a little more green and cheaper.

                                Of course a friend pointed out that she thinks I really want a Thoroughbred. Not that they happen to be in my budget, but that I LIKE them. I can't say I didn't agree
                                There is (or was) a foundation quarter horse FB sale page with most horses being well below $10K. However, the problem I have encountered is that so many QHs are broke at 2 and doing fairly hard work at 3, I worry about future soundness. Sometimes you can find a freshly started 3 year old that hasn't done much yet, and they're usually good-minded enough that the greenness isn't a big deal.

                                But good luck with the trial horse; hopefully he's a keeper and these comments will be moot!

                                Comment

                                  Original Poster

                                  #56
                                  Well I don't always take my own advice. I kind of got talked into doing a trial on a horse, by multiple people.

                                  Problem is, so far I am really liking the horse. But I really don't feel that he's 100% sound. Now I know he was barefoot and not trimmed right. Now he has shoes but I still see something. Ugh. Now I need to decide whether I want to do a PPE or walk. I know what the smart decision would be of course I'm enjoying him now. I'm kicking myself, dammit.

                                  Comment


                                    #57
                                    Originally posted by Lunabear1988 View Post
                                    Well I don't always take my own advice. I kind of got talked into doing a trial on a horse, by multiple people.

                                    Problem is, so far I am really liking the horse. But I really don't feel that he's 100% sound. Now I know he was barefoot and not trimmed right. Now he has shoes but I still see something. Ugh. Now I need to decide whether I want to do a PPE or walk. I know what the smart decision would be of course I'm enjoying him now. I'm kicking myself, dammit.
                                    One option might be to take some video, send it to your lameness vet and tell him you are considering doing a PPE on the gelding but don't want to move forward if he is unsound. Many vets will do a phone consult. There is a fee, but it is cheaper than a farm call and the associated PPE. A phone consult doesn't begin to replace a PPE (think of it as a "pre" PPE) but it might confirm your fears or alleviate them without going several hundred dollars into the hole, or whatever a field visit and a lameness evaluation will run you.

                                    Comment

                                      Original Poster

                                      #58
                                      OneTwoMany yes my vet is fantastic about looking at video/photos and giving me a first impression. It's saved me a few PPE'S. I'll definitely do that. In the mean time, I have to try not to enjoy him too much yet...

                                      Comment


                                        #59
                                        Originally posted by Lunabear1988 View Post
                                        Well I don't always take my own advice. I kind of got talked into doing a trial on a horse, by multiple people.

                                        Problem is, so far I am really liking the horse. But I really don't feel that he's 100% sound. Now I know he was barefoot and not trimmed right. Now he has shoes but I still see something. Ugh. Now I need to decide whether I want to do a PPE or walk. I know what the smart decision would be of course I'm enjoying him now. I'm kicking myself, dammit.
                                        Definitely send video to your vet, given what you've said about their willingness to look at that kind of thing. You're lucky to be able to do that. Do you have a trainer with an eye for lameness that you can confer with? Sounds like you do dressage, and IME most decent dressage trainers are also decent at spotting lameness.

                                        NQR can be difficult to get to the bottom of without significant vetting (I have the bills from a few goose-chases to prove it). But I'm not sure that walking away is so certainly the smart decision, given your budget, the scarcity of 100% sound horses with mid-level dressage potential in the region and price range, and how much you seem to be enjoying this guy. Does your vet know what sorts of things would be dealbreakers for you?

                                        Comment

                                          Original Poster

                                          #60
                                          X_Halt_Salute honestly the trainers I've been working with consult me (I used to work for a vet and have a sensitive eye.) I've always found I'm more picky than any trainers but I usually am in line with what the vets see.

                                          My vet does have a pretty good idea with knowing what I will deal with or not. Unfortunately, due to location, she can't do the PPE. She did give me a number of a vet she would recommend in that location. Or I could take him to CSU.

                                          I have another week. I'm going to try some magic cushion and see how that goes. If I just really really like him, I suppose I can do a PPE and go from there. I'd walk if it was anything much more than thin soles. And if it was, I would want to adjust shoeing and have him s 100 percent sound before buying. I think that's fair.

                                          We will see. I guess I'll go with my gut.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X