Stallion Spotlight

C-Quito1

Real Estate Spotlight

untitled (115 of 123)-Edit
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Pasture boarding/water question

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pasture boarding/water question

    Hi there folks, new user here from Tennessee. I've been doing a bunch of online research regarding pasture boarding & kept being directed here, so I figured I'd just sign up & ask questions directly

    My wife & I operate a boarding kennel in middle TN, and we have 16 acres of prime pasture land that has been mostly unused for the last 10 years, other than cutting for hay, twice a year. The grass is a mixture of common orchard, fescue & Timothy. We have a large, well covered & maintained hay barn with 2 entrance walk throughs, lots of shade trees & a spring feed, ¼ acre pond & we've decided we'd like to offer self-cater pasture boarding for 8 horses.
    I've securely fenced the entire property (high tensile, 4-strand, wooden & T-posts) cut the overly long grass & checked the entire property for anything sharp, pointy or possible injury causing & we're almost ready to start advertising.

    Before we do though, I have a couple of questions that I can't seem to figure out:

    We have a stand pipe next to the barn & I was planning on running automatic trough fillers on 2, 110 gallon troughs (I'm happy to go with more, if y'all think it's necessary). Unfortunately, this is the ONLY place I can easily run water. Is it ok to have the water concentrated in one place like this, or should it be more spread out around the fields? Bear in mind the horses can access the pond too...

    My wife also keeps bees. Just one hive right now, but until winter, it's impossible/impractical to move it, it's right next to the pond and the horses will be able to get very close to it. My plan is to fence around the hive so they can't actually touch the thing (4 12x5 cattle panels to make a 'bee corral' ) but she's concerned that if the bees took exception to a horse & started to sting it, it could potentially do harm. Is this something any if you have dealt with before? Are bees a concern?

    Thanks in advance for your advice & thanks for all the unknown answers I've got from you in the last few months!

  • #2
    We have bees and they aren't bothered by the horses. So long as its not a busy area, like near a gate where horses might congregate near the barn, I'm not too worried about that.

    as for the water, if that's an area that gets muddy, it will get exponentially more muddy I like to have my water in an area that gets afternoon shade so the tank isn't getting sun all day. So, is this area well draining and sometimes shady?

    Comment


    • #3
      PS someone will be horrified by high tensile. You might consider a good solar charger and a top strand of hot wire or hot tape. I have coated high tensile and this is how I keep mine off the fence.

      Comment


      • #4
        Or you could build a "gravel pad" around the watering area - lay down railroad ties to keep things in place (make it large enough for several horses to stand on at once) and fill with.... something. Sand, gravel, whatever. It will at least keep the "watering hole" less muddy.

        Comment


        • #5
          You may want to consider horse access to the pond may not be in the best interest of the horses or all else using that pond.
          Livestock causes much damage and erosion around water edges and that is not good, adds to water contamination, especially in standing water, not running water like a creek.

          You have checked with your county agent or such, to see if protecting water as in your pond is part of the laws where you are, where you can't let livestock have direct access to it, or need to make a special access point for that and what is required for that?

          Comment


          • #6
            All good ideas so far.

            But a question: what's your experience in horse keeping? If you're reasonably experienced then you're likely OK. If not, then maybe you should rethink the project.

            As far as layout is concerned, don't lock yourself into squares or other, neat geometric patterns. One way to address a central watering point to fence it off and then divide the rest of the pasture into sections that meet a part of the fenced off area. Put a gate there. Now you can control access to the watering point (nice for doing maintenance without 4-legged help ) as well as easily rotate the stock between pastures.

            In any event you MUST upgrade your footing in the watering area and at any gates or you will have a see of mud on a regular and frequent basis.*

            I commend to you Cherry Hill's book Horse Keeping on Small Acreage. You can get it from Amazon and it's not expensive. It has a weath of information that you can use. Your County Agent also has LOT of stuff that could be valuable to you. You're already paid for it in your taxes so don't be shy about asking for help.

            Good luck as you go forward.

            G.

            *Living in Tennessee I'm sure you know that the word "tennessee" is actually two Indian words, "tenn" meaning "mud" and "essee" meaning "more mud"!!! We live in East TN and learned very quickly about mud in places where the annual rainfall runs about 50".
            Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raa, Uma Paixo

            Comment


            • #7
              Will you provide covered shelters in the pasture? 8 horses on 16 acres may overload the capacity of the pasture and you may end up with a lot of mud if overgrazed.

              In my area, no one would board with high tensile wire because it will tear up a horse who runs into it or gets it's legs caught in it. It slices like a knife. I think you need to add a top board w/ electric and see how that would be.

              Also be prepared for self boarders to be absentee sometimes and you may have to be more hands on than you want to be.
              Also i hope you're good at bill collecting as self boarders are interested in 'cheap board' and money may be a problem.

              It's not something I would do to make extra money because of all the headaches that self boarders bring. IMO.
              "There is no fundamental difference between man and animals in their ability to feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery." - Charles Darwin

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Marla 100 View Post
                Will you provide covered shelters in the pasture? 8 horses on 16 acres may overload the capacity of the pasture and you may end up with a lot of mud if overgrazed.

                In my area, no one would board with high tensile wire because it will tear up a horse who runs into it or gets it's legs caught in it. It slices like a knife. I think you need to add a top board w/ electric and see how that would be.

                Also be prepared for self boarders to be absentee sometimes and you may have to be more hands on than you want to be.
                Also i hope you're good at bill collecting as self boarders are interested in 'cheap board' and money may be a problem.

                It's not something I would do to make extra money because of all the headaches that self boarders bring. IMO.
                Adding to that, have a suitable boarding contract that spells what you will do with those that don't pay and/or abandon their horses.
                What that may be will be guided by applicable local laws.
                Sooner or later you will have some horse/s dumped on your lap, owner not to be found.
                Then you have to care for them yourself until their legal status is decided, something that may take months.
                That is part of boarding horses for others, even if self care boarding.

                Comment


                • #9
                  A few problems here that I see.
                  First of all, the high tensile fence is a no-go for a lot of horse people. High tensile wire cuts through horse flesh like butter. For many other people, T-posts are also a no-go. Some people will be okay with these fencing materials, but these are also people who are going to have lower standards of horse care in general. At a minimum, I think you would best add a strand of electric tape.

                  Also, having one large 16 acre paddock is not super useful. Horses are herd animals but they can be very aggressive and injure each other in artificially put together herds, such as at boarding facilities where horses are added and removed at regular intervals. In general, mares and geldings are best not kept together at boarding facilities. Also, being able to rotate and rest pastures for seeding, fertilizing or spraying is very ideal. So, at a minimum, I think you would best create two fields, but optimally up to 4.

                  Also what shelter would these horses have? I doubt you would want them walking through your hay barn. There should be a protected area for the vet or farrier to attend to a horse. You might consider a run in shed. However, if you have plenty of shade trees this may not be necessary. Be aware that horses will often damage and kill trees by stripping the bark.

                  I also think you should reconsider the "self-cater" part of your business. For many people self-care = no care. I think you would best assume that most of these self-care clients are not actually going to show up and take care of their horses. Be sure to factor in the cost of your time to check up on things and provide care when it is not provided. I would also take into account your own experience and ability to provide that care. Also, in winter, self care provision of hay is always a bone of contention, so I would add in that cost and provide it yourself. I would also consider that despite a low cost, self-care boarding situation, horse boarding clients can be demanding.

                  As for your questions:
                  Water does not need to be spread out in a paddock, one water source is fine. However, you should optimally amend the ground surrounding the water source to ensure you don't end up with a mud pit. Remember that horses will automatically destroy anything they can reach, so set up your automatic tank fillers such that the horses can't reach them. I personally have not found automatic tank fillers to be useful for horses. They are super handy for cattle, but horses often will try to swim or play in their water tanks in hot weather, plus horses can be much pickier about water, so horse water tanks generally need to be emptied and scrubbed more often than for other kinds of stock. Also, as I mentioned, horses play with and break anything they can reach.

                  The bees are a non-issue for the horses. I have kept bees and horses in very close proximity. However, there is a possibility that your clients will have a problem with it. I have found that not all people are comfortable with the idea of bee hives nearby.

                  Ultimately, I would not recommend that you embark on this business. I have been boarding horses for decades and I can tell you that the financial rewards are extremely slim, especially compared to a lucrative business like dog boarding. Horses require very specific care and management and things can go south in a hurry. Self care clients are notoriously irresponsible and due to the service you are thinking of offering and your newness to the business, you are at VERY high likelihood of supervising irresponsible clients and ending up with no-pay clients and having horses abandoned with you. Because you don't describe any riding facilities like an arena, I think you will mostly end up with retired horses. IME, people are not likely to show up every day to take care of a retired horse, and you will be lucky to get the bills paid. Successful retirement farms offer full care, screen clients carefully and bank on their reputation for high quality care to attract paying clients.

                  I don't know what abandonment rates are for kenneled dogs, but at least with a dog you could presumably take it to a shelter--with a horse you are stuck. Stableman's lien laws are not super helpful in most states. In the meantime you will be with a large animal that requires a lot of expensive care. Retired horses often have increased health needs and require extra care.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    not a good idea - IMHO
                    Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Horses also hurt themselves in horrific ways or can be subject to illnesses that are life threatening such as colic. its unconscionable to leave the animals to suffer so you will need a good relationship with an equine vet and a disposal method for the 1000 pound carcass. Generally it is best for you as the onsite resident and manager to take control of that. If the horse is euthed by gunshot, (and you better learn how to do that right) and you can do the butchering you could send it to the kennels, but a horse euthed by the vet will generally need to be buried or pose a health risk to scavengers. In most municipalities even a natural death is required to be disposed of rather than let to rot in order not to contaminate the water supply.

                      Theyll need certain shots and should have a Coggins test that is clear before they set foot on your place and mingle. They should not be allowed to mingle immediately, they need to be introduced to the herd and can bring diseases in so that means a small independent space separated by safe fencing.They need to have their feet trimmed at intervals if they are not shod, shoes also need care and resetting or replacement and a lot of people won't keep a shod horse out to pasture as a good kick can seriously injure or kill. Do not board a stallion, try not to board a mare that is pregnant, if given a chance horses will breed, watch out for situations such as the Fall River 40 that is on here right now, rescued horses that were allowed to breed and now there are twice as many where the property owners have had to involve law enforcement to get them gone. Have a minimum standard of handleability, they may NEED to get on a trailer right now, they need to cooperate for the vet, the farrier, for you.

                      Up here in KY there are people with multiple horses that would want to rent your place, they generally do care for their animals but you may have to accommodate their trailer and equipment storage, though they usually take care of filling troughs there is the possibility they'll leave the water running, they may leave things in your way, may want to bring their own dogs, may be more underfoot than you are used to with your boarding clientele , stuff like that.

                      My FIL has a dog breeding, showing and boarding business with saddle horses and sheep on site and honestly he is close to a hoarder as the workload is huge and he needs helpers just to feed. Not to mention kennel cleaning and disposal of feces for all the critters. Pastures at the big horse farms here are kept mowed and the manure dispersed, he had a series of pipe pens that had to be picked.

                      If you want to use the ground perhaps run 8 or fewer steers to fatten on your own account? My coworker buys young dairy steers and runs them for the season then trucks them to the auction and lets the ground rest over the winter. You must have experience in customer relations with the dogs but people think of horses differently, there is still a lot of livestock vs pet, where dogs are clearly pets and much less likely to be abandoned. In general anyway, some folks are just horrible.
                      Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                      Incredible Invisible

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There's self care, and then there's renting out the facility i.e.: offering dry stalls. When you say you have a hay barn, I imagine there's loft space for hay above and an area for stalls below.

                        You are entirely hands off as the property owner except WRT maintenance. And I I strongly suggest you put a clause in your least contract about destructive animals, who handles mowing and snow removal, etc. And also an expected standard of care -- that if not met, has horse owner evicted and horses sent for whatever fate you specify.

                        I'd much rather see you rent out the whole facility and let someone lease it from you wherein THEY assume responsibility for day to day care of horses living there.

                        Contracts stating standard of care and repercussions of not met including timelines.
                        Insurance.. care custody and control as well as liability.
                        Have them cover their own 'soft' costs, like electric. If you offer utilities included you will inevitably find people who can't manage to shut off a light.

                        I don't think this is a horrible idea. Just approach cautiously and have a trusted mentor to guide you through any speed bumps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Concerning your primary question RE: Water - I always have two water sources per pasture, a primary and a backup. I am also in TN. Winter weather can freeze what you thought would be a great source of water - then suddenly you have a giant block of ice (well, unless you are in Memphis - then that is unlikely). Vut, still, have two water souces per pasture (not to include a pond as one source - personally, I'd fence that off - we do have VERY large snapping turtles here!!!).

                          In your description of your property, you don't mention a few things:

                          Riding Area/Ring/Arena - If you don't have a designated place to ride, this will certainly limit your clientele. Or are you near trails/national park and expecting clients to just trail ride off property? Will you have other areas for exercising - like a round pen? Unless your place is just for retired horses that can't be ridden, most clients will be expecting somewhere to ride - preferably lit for evening/early morning riding.

                          Stalls - Does that hay barn have any structure for stalls or is it a true hay barn - 3/4 walls and a roof for hay storage? When a client's horse gets injured or sick, they will need somewhere to house it to recuperate. So you need to have several stalls available (even if you charge extra for that while the horse is recuperating). Most farriers and some vets frown upon servicing horses in a pasture or on a driveway - so a structure is needed to get out of the elements to do their thing.

                          Field(s) - You say your 16 acre field is all fenced. Is it just one field? Or broken into several? Typically (though not always), mares have a pasture and geldings have a pasture. Or each horse has a paddock or small pasture. This assures everyone can get along. I would not just turn out 8-10 horses onto a single 16 acre field and hope all went well.

                          Shelters - Each pasture/paddock needs a shelter large enough for the number of horses in that area. For a single 16 acre pasture, you'd need several shelters, so everyone isn't trying to cram into one - some poor horse will always be left out.

                          As others have suggested, the high tensile wire would bother me. I would add a 1X6 wood top rail AND electric at knee high and nose high to keep them away (and use something colored to identify the fence at regular intervals). A very good friend of ours had a child nearly decapitated back in the 90's from riding their pony through a fence they didn't see. The pony ducked, the child didn't and nearly died.

                          Good luck on your project.
                          ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            read everything BeeHoney and 4LeafCloverFarm wrote several times. Print them out and read again.

                            While there are good self-care boarders out there, there are far more horror stories. Unless you and/or wife are very experienced horse-people yourselves than I strongly recommend you do NOT do this. (and frankly, based on the questions regarding water, and the choice of fencing, it sounds like you're not ready to embark on this kind of adventure).

                            Renting the horse-part of the property to a single individual with multiple horses may work well, if you have an ironclad and extremely specific contract in place. And as others said, any boarder worth having is going to want a place to ride, stalls available, and safe fencing.
                            A good man can make you feel sexy, strong, and able to take on the world.... oh, sorry.... that's wine...wine does that...

                            http://elementfarm.blogspot.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Much easier and probably more profitable to just continue to bale and sell hay. Or you could lease out the pasture to an area cattle -man to graze his cows on for a time each year for some extra profit.

                              Self care , having boarders and all the responsibility of having it on your place is not for the faint of heart and for most is a real pain.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Regarding your water source...horses will figure it out. We have horses on ~10 acres and one water trough, no one has suffered in years/ever. That particular trough may need to be changes and cleaned more often the the 1-2 horses per pasture horses, oh well. Not hard. You may wish to spread rock over the dirt/mud if it becomes a problem. I suggest a trough with a low nozzle that you can use to drain the water. Depending on the access to the sun, it might become rather green rather quickly. We clean the troughs in NC 1 to 2 times per week depending on the temp, number on horses drinking from it and trough greenery.

                                Good luck!
                                Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Short version:

                                  Water no problem. Throw down some stone dust behind revetted railroad ties if it gets mucky. Site the tubs in a place with good drainage. 2 100-gal. standard Rubbermaid tubs should be more than enough for 8 horses.

                                  "Self-care" as a business model sucks--because people are erratic. Figure out what you need to make if you are providing the hay, grain only if needed, and 1x per day feeding by you with otherwise pasture board. You will need some kind of run-in shed. 8 horses should do FINE on a pasture that large, even mares/geldings mixed, as long as there are no "bad actors" and everyone is barefoot. DO NOT count on boarders to show up daily to feed--totally won't happen. More fraught is having them provide their own hay and grain--quality differences lead to horses fighting for the best stuff, they'll run out and either not feed at all or "borrow" without permission. Instead, YOU provide the basic necessities, YOU provide the care, and YOU make sure you're making a profit on it. BTW, make sure you set up properly as a business and ALL those supplies (feed, hay, fences, tubs, footing, services, etc.) can be WRITTEN OFF!

                                  Issues of non-payment, vet care, abandonment (rare) and carcass disposal as well as liability are all very easily handled via a properly drawn up and signed written boarding contract. There are many templates for these online, available for free. Or have an ag-knowledgeable attorney create one for you. NEVER in 45 years have I been called upon to shoot (good grief!) a client's horse let alone butcher it--this is absurdly hyperbolic drama and something NO ONE does. I doubt one person in 40,000 today would be even capable of it. Which is why you have a vet and a disposal guy lined up and in speed-dial LONG before the need should ever arise, with the cost of those services contractually to be borne by the OWNER.

                                  If every customer knows exactly what your expectations are coming in, you should not have many bad experiences. Screen your clients carefully for compatibility, ask for references and check them, and don't hesitate to ask the opinions of more experienced people like your vet, farrier, feed and hay folks, and local Cooperative Extension Service. Just like your beekeeping, you'll be fine! Just make sure at the end of the year you're actually making money, which is of course the entire point.

                                  (CRIKEY, people, if everyone was as crepe-hanging negative as many posters here, NO ONE would have anyplace to board and horses would be EXTINCT by now!)

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    About hi-tensile fences. I've combined horses & hi-ten for over 20 years without injury. Horses will hurt themselves on any kind of fencing... and have. The important point of hi-ten is: it is a mental barrier. It MUST be electrified and the animals trained to avoid it. Post toppers on the tee-posts are a must with horses. The herd dynamics is also important. Throwing a bunch of strange horses together is trouble. Even introducing one horse to another single horse is done with caution. Like chickens, a pecking order is going to be established. There will be bumps and bruises at first. So a stable herd is important to prevent a horse from getting chased through a fence trying to escape a more dominate herd mate. A boarded herd with constant turn over is constant trouble.

                                    In my experience, even two horses will destroy 16 acres UNLESS the area is broken into smaller parcels. Horses will pick a spot of grass and eat it to bare dirt, leaving acres of lush grass untouched. They must be moved to another parcel to save that spot of grass. Which is something else to consider. Horses are selective grazers. They will leave weeds and other plants. You'll have to mow these left-overs or soon weeds will be all that's left in your formerly nice grass pastures.
                                    Equus makus brokus but happy

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by hosspuller View Post
                                      About hi-tensile fences. I've combined horses & hi-ten for over 20 years without injury. Horses will hurt themselves on any kind of fencing... and have. The important point of hi-ten is: it is a mental barrier. It MUST be electrified and the animals trained to avoid it. Post toppers on the tee-posts are a must with horses. The herd dynamics is also important. Throwing a bunch of strange horses together is trouble. Even introducing one horse to another single horse is done with caution. Like chickens, a pecking order is going to be established. There will be bumps and bruises at first. So a stable herd is important to prevent a horse from getting chased through a fence trying to escape a more dominate herd mate. A boarded herd with constant turn over is constant trouble.

                                      In my experience, even two horses will destroy 16 acres UNLESS the area is broken into smaller parcels. Horses will pick a spot of grass and eat it to bare dirt, leaving acres of lush grass untouched. They must be moved to another parcel to save that spot of grass. Which is something else to consider. Horses are selective grazers. They will leave weeds and other plants. You'll have to mow these left-overs or soon weeds will be all that's left in your formerly nice grass pastures.
                                      Yes. My BO says my horse is the only uniform grazer on the property, but he wasn't in another pasture with another horse and they concentrated on the clover areas. He now grazed tall and short grass, most others don't. I'm very leary of hi-ten fences without a wooden top rail since I saw the damage done to my horse's pasturemate at a previous barn when they had lived together with an older gelding for months and something made them\her run through it one day.
                                      Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

                                      Comment

                                      Working...
                                      X