Stallion Spotlight

Sir Donnerhall_02Beelitz

Real Estate Spotlight

528KerwinHill-003-HDRInternet
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Vet just prescribed Equioxx - anything I need to know?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vet just prescribed Equioxx - anything I need to know?

    Vet was out on Monday to see my 28 yr old draft cross gelding who was starting to show some discomfort in his left hock. After her exam (where she concurred it was his hock - likely arthritic changes), she pulled blood for several blood tests (which came back spectacularly normal) to ensure he had no underlying issues and prescribed 1 57mg tab of Equioxx 3X a week.

    So, this is venturing into new territory for me. I'm not familiar at all with this medicine, what to watch for (if anything), whether there are long term effects (like Bute can cause gastric issues in some horses), or anything else I should know?

    I've placed the order through my online pharmacy Allivet and should have meds the first of next week. So I'm not giving it yet. My horse gets his meals soaked - I'm assuming there is no issue with just tossing the tab into the mush? He'll literally eat anything, so I could probably just feed it as a treat if need be.

    Anyway, any info on this (new to me) medication much appreciated!
    ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

  • #2
    The most common side effects associated with EQUIOXX Tablets therapy involve the tongue, lips and skin of the mouth and face (erosions and ulcers of the mucosa and skin) and the kidney.

    Comment


    • #3
      Here's a link that may help.

      http://www.equioxx.com/faq

      it is a pain reducer that can be used for a longer period of time than Bute without causing ulcers

      Comment


      • #4
        I did a month of Equioxx with my horse to get him through some soreness issues. The only issue we had was he had loose manure for the first day or so. Once his body adjusted to the med, his manure went back to normal. Now, I didn't use this long term, so I didn't have to deal with chronic side effects, but I've heard other people mention kidney and possibly liver issues (reduced function?).

        The pill is teeny tiny, like ibuprofen, so I just fed it in a handful of senior feed. I have a somewhat picky eater, but he gobbled it down and had no issue with it.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by walkinthewalk View Post
          Here's a link that may help.

          http://www.equioxx.com/faq

          it is a pain reducer that can be used for a longer period of time than Bute without causing ulcers
          Thanks for that link. Informative, but does not list possible side effects, especially for long term use.
          Last edited by 4LeafCloverFarm; Jun. 7, 2019, 01:30 PM. Reason: Should have been a "not" in there!
          ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by SettleDownNow View Post
            The most common side effects associated with EQUIOXX Tablets therapy involve the tongue, lips and skin of the mouth and face (erosions and ulcers of the mucosa and skin) and the kidney.
            Well that's a bit alarming! Okay, so keep an eye on his mouth and lips for any changes. I'm guessing we'll need to do an annual blood draw to keep an eye on kidney function. He's been so incredibly healthy for an old guy that we haven't been taking blood at every annual checkup.
            ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SettleDownNow View Post
              The most common side effects associated with EQUIOXX Tablets therapy involve the tongue, lips and skin of the mouth and face (erosions and ulcers of the mucosa and skin) and the kidney.
              This makes it sound very alarming!! But Equioxx is widely used and has really helped a lot of horses. Far easier on the stomach than bute. To the OP, yes, certainly watch for anything that might crop up, but do NOT be alarmed, lots of older horses have had their lives made more comfortable with this!

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by Madison View Post

                This makes it sound very alarming!! But Equioxx is widely used and has really helped a lot of horses. Far easier on the stomach than bute. To the OP, yes, certainly watch for anything that might crop up, but do NOT be alarmed, lots of older horses have had their lives made more comfortable with this!
                Whew! I feel better now. Thank you!
                ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

                Comment


                • #9
                  My 11 year old is on it, and probably will be for the rest of her (hopefully, long) life. Long-term use is considered by my vet to be many years. My vet has recommended, for long-termers, to feed 3 weeks on, then 1 off (if the horse can handle being without pain relief for a week).
                  I haven't noticed any issues with it, I feed it either in my apple core, or in a handful of cube mash or even just hay pellets dry. Eaten no problem.
                  Can't learn anything with a closed mind! with thanks to mug

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have 5 older horses that have been on Equioxx/Previcox since 2008. Not a single issue and it has greatly improved their quality of life. All are now in their late 20s.

                    Doesn't mean your horse couldn't have a reaction, but I know a lot of people that use it and not one has had an issue.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have had three aged ponies on it long term with no side effects. My current pony did have blood drawn to check his kidneys and he is fine. It kept my 33 year old gelding with hock arthritis very comfortable during the last 3-4 years of his life. He was playful in the paddock right up until the end.
                      I always feed it it a peice of apple or carrot just so I am sure that they get the pill.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Thanks for the real life experiences. Very helpful.

                        What doseages are you all using? My vet wants to start conservatively (which is fine by me) with just one 57mg pill, 3 times a week (so like Mon, Wed, Fri). Then see how he does and reassess in a month or so. He's a big boy - 17.2h, 1700 pounds. But when I asked if the one pill would be enough because of his size, I think I sort of zoned out on the explanation - something to do with the pharmacology of the drug being more potent in a large horse? It was like 94° that day, and I was melting at that point.
                        ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 4LeafCloverFarm View Post
                          Thanks for the real life experiences. Very helpful.

                          What dosages are you all using?
                          1x 57mg dose/day [1/4 228mg Previcox pill}. 21 days on, 7 days off. when first started we double-dosed for the first day only, then down to 57mg daily. 16hh, ~1100lbs.
                          hope that helps
                          Can't learn anything with a closed mind! with thanks to mug

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had a late-teens gelding with a mystery lameness (never could get to the bottom of it) who was on it for over a year. I don’t recall if he was on 1/2 or whole 57mg pill daily. No side effects for him. Kept him happily pasture sound.
                            "We need a pinned ears icon." -MysticOakRanch

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Anecdotally, I have heard that it does not work as well as bute for lameness and other somatic pain. Theoretically it has less GI side effects than other NSAIDs but it is still an NSAID and there are still risks.
                              Von Hendrix aka Jimi

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                3x a week is kind of odd. It has a long half life and is thus typically dosed so that the max serum concentration is given after a few days. Some prescription NSAIDs for people work the same way. Giving it 3x a week won't give you the full effect of the drug. Seems kind of a waste to me.

                                As far as side effects, this site tells you the adverse reactions that were noted in the trials. https://www.drugs.com/pro/equioxx.html

                                You will see that one horse had an "excitation" response. The other responses were GI in nature. My horse is the excitable horse... I did a brief trial a few years ago, and he was a lunatic. Overreactive to everything. Like a horse jumping on the other side of the arena has a light rub, and my horse loses his mind in a bronc fest. Out of his mind. Took him off, back to his normal self which isn't 100% sane but far below the realm of crazy he had on Equioxx. I've known several other horses who have gotten it without this reaction. But ya know, mine had to be in the 0.7%.

                                It is a very tiny pill, so most that I know who feed it every day stuff it in a horse muffin or something that can get thrown into the feed and will be more likely to be eaten and not dribbled out.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Thanks for that link IPEsq. Well, excitation in my horse will be super easy to spot. He's about as low key as you can get. So I will add that to my list of things to look for. Sorry your horse had such an adverse reaction. That does not sound fun at all.
                                  ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by mckenna310 View Post
                                    Anecdotally, I have heard that it does not work as well as bute for lameness and other somatic pain. Theoretically it has less GI side effects than other NSAIDs but it is still an NSAID and there are still risks.
                                    In my horse who lives on it, bute had no effect on his pain but the equioxx pretty much ‘cured’ him.
                                    Of course, it isn’t lower limb issues that he has so maybe it depends on the type of lameness the horse has.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Pills arrived today. Ya'll weren't kidding about them being small! I think I'll use the fig newton method. My luck would be that the pill in the mash would be one time he looks up while eating and its the one thing that ends up on the ground.
                                      ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        My 21ish mare has been on Equioxx now for a year, one pill a day. She has arthritis also.It has helped a ton. If you don't see noticeable results in a few weeks at the dose your vet recommended, I'd ask about increasing the dose to daily.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X