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ERU

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  • ERU

    Purchased a horse with ERU, in one eye she is totally blind. She is a 7 year old appy buckskin roan. Does anyone know the likelihood that this could affect her other eye?? She’s soooo good and rides perfect! Her blind eye doesn’t affect her at all. I just hope she doesn’t go blind in the other.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Missey View Post
    Purchased a horse with ERU, in one eye she is totally blind. She is a 7 year old appy buckskin roan. Does anyone know the likelihood that this could affect her other eye?? She’s soooo good and rides perfect! Her blind eye doesn’t affect her at all. I just hope she doesn’t go blind in the other.
    ERU or moonblindness is easily researched online. Did you understand the problem when you bought the mare, did you do a PPE, and if so what did the vet say? And if so, honestly, why did you buy the horse?

    By coincidence I was chatting to someone yesterday who was trail riding a 17 year old appy with 30% vision in one eye and 70% vision in the other.

    Yes, some appies do go completely blind.

    I really like appies but I myself would not buy one that was already showing signs of moonblindness.

    https://www.vet.k-state.edu/vhc/serv...blindness.html

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      When I say purchased I really didn’t pay jack for her! She’s a beautiful mare and I feel she still deserves a life of love. I understand the disease and that she could totally go blind, (I own an 11 year old that’s completely blind and has been since age 3. I’ve done countless research but what the research doesn’t say, is the likely hood of both eyes being affected? As of right now she’s happy fat and loved and rides perfect

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        And I paid 200 for her more of an adoption fee

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Missey View Post
          When I say purchased I really didn’t pay jack for her! She’s a beautiful mare and I feel she still deserves a life of love. I understand the disease and that she could totally go blind, (I own an 11 year old that’s completely blind and has been since age 3. I’ve done countless research but what the research doesn’t say, is the likely hood of both eyes being affected? As of right now she’s happy fat and loved and rides perfect
          I think it's basically a crap shoot whether both eyes go, but in appies it certainly happens. Your vet would be your best resource on whether there is any trouble brewing yet in the other eye.

          I'm glad she found a soft landing with you.

          None of us here can tell you the odds better than the medical research that has followed hundreds of horses. If the medical research is inconclusive then that's where current knowledge stands. Anecdotes about one horse we knew that went fully or partially blind don't say anything about your horse or about the overall statistical average.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            From my understanding they said she had the episode at age 4 that made her go blind in the left eye but nothing else has happened or that eye hasn’t changed at all. Her other eye is perfect still so finger crossed! And even if she does go blind she will still have a forever home, horses adapt amazingly

            Comment


            • #7
              There is a surgery ('exchange' of aqueous humor, if caused by leptospirosis)- if the horse shows recurrent inflammation, might be an option.

              Comment


              • #8
                Have her seen by an ophthalmologist. They may be able to prevent the ERU from making her totally blind.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cyclosporine implants supposedly prevent ERU from progressing. https://www.equisearch.com/discoverh...itis-treatment

                  I wonder if you applied prednisolone drops even while the eye is healthy - like once every other day, if it would prevent flare ups?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Going to second the opthalmologist. I had a horse with chronic eye issues and having an opthalmologist on board was a godsend.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      I don’t have one on board but I’ll look into this! Thanks guys

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 4horses View Post
                        Cyclosporine implants supposedly prevent ERU from progressing. https://www.equisearch.com/discoverh...itis-treatment

                        I wonder if you applied prednisolone drops even while the eye is healthy - like once every other day, if it would prevent flare ups?
                        There are NSAID ointments (profenol, flurbiprofen and diclofenamic acid) that can be prescribed for long term use. They are safer than steroids. My mare was prescribed daily flurbiprofen when her eyes were quiet and betamethasone for flares. Though she was already end-stage when diagnosed. She has sub-acute posterior flares which are a lot less noticeable than anterior flares.

                        OP, you will want to see a veterinary ophthalmologist at least annually. There is a decent chance for bilateral uveitis in horses that are prone to the autoimmune response. Catching it early can save vision. And check into the cyclosporine implants. Cyclosporine has shown to be effective at treating autoimmune problems.
                        Last edited by eqsiu; May. 20, 2019, 02:32 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had a horse several years ago who got ERU and eventually went blind in one eye. After that, he was stable for several years. Eventually, he did start to get flare-ups in the other eye, and lost his vision at 18. I think there are more treatment options available now than there were then.

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                          • #14
                            What a nice mare !

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yes, there are quite a few more treatments out there than there were just 10 years ago. You'll want to find a good ophthalmologist that comes through your area and get on their schedule for yearly exams. There aren't a lot of them, but they are truly worth the time/cost to find. Your referral hospital should know the names of the ones that come through the area and be more than happy to share. Should something happen, that person will be available to consult with your regular vet about treatments as well.

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