• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Feed back please...... I want to hearfrom all of you no matter what level you ride..

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Feed back please...... I want to hearfrom all of you no matter what level you ride..

    Okay.....I have gone back and forth on posting this to the point of typing and erasing over and over....but here goes. I think you all are my best shot at a wide view with unbiased opinions. If you were to give a grant for eventing either to riders or horses where do you think that grant would be most useful within the sport and why?
    "A little less chit-chat a little more pitter-pat"

  • #2
    I think that there a lot of talented young riders out there that, once they age out of JR and graduate high school, often are no longer supported by their parents (if they were in the first place) and do not have the funds to attend the competitions to qualify and then to attend NAYRC. With young riders as the future of the sport, perhaps this is the best use of funds.
    "Gallop as if you were to die tomorrow, jump as if you were to live forever."

    Comment


    • #3
      What about some sort of grant for instructor education? Possibly subsidizing applicants to the USEA ICP?
      http://wildwoodfarmnc.com

      http://cantersgutenberg.wordpress.co...g-quiet-goose/

      Comment


      • #4
        Totally agree with ICP- we need to make that program stronger and better. Its the future, as I see it. With education, so many things can happen- and if the ICP program gets stronger, there is hope for a more education for all...trickle down education.

        I do think if there was money to spare, a grant for studying the conditioning of tendons and ligiments would be great- a study following horses thru out the season, with U/S and HR monitors- I think that might be awesome, too. But...

        education begins it all.

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree with the ICP suggestion. It would greatly benefit the trainer, who would then benefit countless #'s of eventer over the years!!

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            OKay before you all go crazy on the ICP thing..... just to clarify....We are not looking to benefit the professionals or the already "known" riders.

            This is a question more of which riders at what level, and or should it be for the horses and at what level or whatever. Not looking to help fund programs or support peoples instructors here .....trying to help actual eventers.... think entries, off set travel expenses, etc.
            Last edited by BigRuss1996; Dec. 12, 2007, 08:02 AM.
            "A little less chit-chat a little more pitter-pat"

            Comment


            • #7
              personally- I think ages 25-35 and up are the most difficult when it comes to expenses and competing. There are still many serious riders who did well as YRs or got a late start, but are either working full time jobs, or trying to "make it" as a pro. Its a really difficult time financially and is a lot of times the end to a promising career when these riders are forced out of the sport due to finances. There are grants for YR's, there are grants for Adult Amateurs, but not so much for those in between.

              Comment


              • #8
                1st off I believe that benefiting coaches by giving scholarships for the ICP certification is a great suggestion. Our Area V adult riders is for ammys and pros, and offers an ICP grant each year.

                Originally posted by olympicdreams04 View Post
                I think that there a lot of talented young riders out there that, once they age out of JR and graduate high school, often are no longer supported by their parents (if they were in the first place) and do not have the funds to attend the competitions to qualify and then to attend NAYRC. With young riders as the future of the
                sport, perhaps this is the best use of funds.
                Also, there is an outstanding bias in this sport towards adult amateur riders.

                so let me rephrase the above statement.

                I think that there are a lot of talented riders out there that graduated high school and college and often do not have the funds to clinic with BNTs or take weekly lessons from a regional coach, or attend competitions to qualify for the developing riders program. With the young adults as the future of the sport, perhaps this is the best use of the funds.


                The 25 to 35 age group always seems to be lost in the mix. And I am a current activist. [wink]
                The USEA also awards two Worth The Trust Adult Amateur Scholarships each year. There is an age group cut off for Young Adult (25 and under I believe), and Adult Amateur Scholarships. The young adults again are awarded more.

                If a scholarship is to go towards riders and competition, I think the Beacon Charm Grant really nails it.
                You must show proof of:
                [amongst other things]
                low income
                outstanding competition records

                A grant(sponsorship) would also be very useful in aiding CICs and CCIs. Or even organizers starting new venues. Organizers are stretched very thin. The thinner they are stretched, the higher our entry fees.


                That's all I've got. I'm not very good with these things. My imagination goes ka-put and suddenly my scope is shallow. : (
                http://kaboomeventing.com/
                http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would love to see a scholarship for adult amateurs like the Dressage Foundation's Gifted Fund. It is designed to give adult riders time away from the pressures of work and family. I for one would love to have such an opportunity.

                  ETA: OK, so I forgot about the Worth The Trust scholarships. But the Gifted Fund awards more (smaller) scholarships per year, I believe.

                  ETA again: I do see what purpl is talking about re the gap in help for adult pros who are building their careers, but are not yet big names.
                  SportHorseRiders.com
                  Taco Blog
                  *T3DE 2010 Pact*

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A Prelim rider ready for a CIC*.
                    Good competition record.
                    Wanting to travel out of state.
                    A well thought out plan that will land them at a developing rider camp.
                    [Developing riders is for CIC** and up] So at least a two-three year calender plan SHOULD be up and running for those of us that are serious.

                    I continuously have a 5 year running plan. laughing.
                    I'm looking at my life next year and I"m thinking, sh*t...I've got the 1st string horse and a back up horse on the way...but now I need: Shadbelly, Top Hat, Double Bridle, Travel Trailer (not cowboy trailer), entry fees, fuel to get to Jersey Fresh, (I'm in Texas), Fair Hill, a Feb. at Ocala and Red Hills.
                    OMG my eyes just blew out.

                    As for the horse. To fund a horse's medical care (such as joint injections) feed and supplements? That would be fantastic as well. Uckele pretty much owns the key to my horse's success.

                    Some of our horses have great stories and are destined for the top. I think funding a horse would put a great spin on the idea of helping out a rider financially!
                    Last edited by purplnurpl; Dec. 10, 2007, 10:34 AM.
                    http://kaboomeventing.com/
                    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Purplnurpl and olympicdreams i totally agree! the 25-30ish range is a financially difficult time and a lot of riders have to cut back on riding or forego it altogether for the time being. i am a 25 and i only know a handful of other riders my age. i would love it if this age group could get some notoriety or some help somehow!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by luveventing View Post
                        personally- I think ages 25-35 and up are the most difficult when it comes to expenses and competing. There are still many serious riders who did well as YRs or got a late start, but are either working full time jobs, or trying to "make it" as a pro. Its a really difficult time financially and is a lot of times the end to a promising career when these riders are forced out of the sport due to finances. There are grants for YR's, there are grants for Adult Amateurs, but not so much for those in between.
                        **BINGO!!!!!!!**
                        Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When you say "most useful to the sport" what do you mean?

                          Put another way, what do you want to accomplish with the grant - broadening access to training, helping one person make it to the top maybe, helping 10 people or a region be safer, getting people used to saying, "The BigRuss1996 award" or or or?

                          I'm positive we can come up with lots of ways to help you spend your money, but having a better idea of your goals could target the suggestions. Also, are you talking some sort of major grant, or a couple hundred bucks?
                          http://wildwoodfarmnc.com

                          http://cantersgutenberg.wordpress.co...g-quiet-goose/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think that it is difficult to decide how to set up a grant, when you are not sure how much the grant is going to be for. Yes, entry support and travel support, are all wonderful things. I think offering a grant to a Non-sponsored rider is a first step. There are several upper level, up and coming riders out there that are sponsored, but can still apply for grants and scholarships.
                            Some riders are very talented, and have made it to the upper levels, but have not had the horse to keep going. Some have the horse, and really need the money to travel, and off set the expenses at home while traveling. Some horses need expensive vet care to keep running. Some riders have been there and done well, but need help getting there again.
                            With that, I think that it really depends on what the goal is with the person/firm/group wanting to set up said grant.
                            Their motivation is key in deciding on who, and how to spend the money. Some people really enjoy having a horse go out and win, some people are really supportive in supporting the process of getting there. Again it boils down to what they have to offer, and what the person lucky enough to receive the grant needs.
                            Also making it known that there is a grant out there. It can be difficult to fine the grants that are available.
                            The American Horse Trials Foundation lets the rider decide how to spend the money(within reason) that they have raised. But you are still limited by what you were able to raise. Believe me it is a great help, but you are still hoofing it to find people to help support you.
                            So I say the things that a rider at the upper levels needs(at least one that does not have the funds or sponsor already) would be: Entry/stabling, vet care, travel expenses, continuing education(clinics), equipment, horse(s), and the knowledge that there are people out there willing to help.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by olympicdreams04 View Post
                              I think that there a lot of talented young riders out there that, once they age out of JR and graduate high school, often are no longer supported by their parents (if they were in the first place) and do not have the funds to attend the competitions to qualify and then to attend NAYRC. With young riders as the future of the sport, perhaps this is the best use of funds.
                              As a parent of a daughter who graduates from high school in 6 months, I have to agree! Paying college with another child already in college and another coming along in a few years is going to make it tough!
                              Lori T
                              www.calypsofarmeventers.blogspot.com
                              www.facebook.com/LoriTankelPhotography
                              www.facebook.com/LTEquine for product updates on the lines I rep

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I might have to zip up my firesuit but I beleive there's all too much money devoted to YR and AA already. If you're looking to help the future of the sport look at subsidizing - and making it a whole lot easier - to get younger judges. Have you looked at the average age of even the lowest-level officials these days? There needs to be an eventing program with the reach & universality of the USDF L Program - and, maybe, the acceptance of those who have already gone through that program.
                                Brock
                                Brock n. (Anglo-Saxon) badger as in Brockenhurst, Brocklebank etc www.area35.us

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I agree with KSBadger. I would love to become a judge or official but it seems so unattainable here in Texas (aka Area V). I have tried to look into it and I have the eventing background (CCI***/CIC-W***) and would love to "give back" and it would allow me to be at an event and *gasp* make a few dollars while in Grad School. When I looked into the program it would involve ALOT of out-of-state travel just to get the hours and clinics in.
                                  RIP Kid Gloves (Holly) 1992 TBxHanv CCI*** mare.
                                  http://photobucket.com/tx3dayeventer/holly
                                  New mare: Miss Bunny Express (Missy) 1995 AQHA Jumper mare.
                                  http://photobucket.com/tx3dayeventer/missy

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Agree with tx3dayeventer. I've made my interest known to TPTB, but no response. Know someone else approx late 20s early 30s who did it - it was very onerous to become a TD. Now they are talking about having an "Eventing Judge" designation which would enable events to hire fewer officials - to save costs, but also b/c there aren't that many to start with.

                                    Not sure if that is what the OP is looking for though... I agree with an above poster who asked, what do *you* want from it?

                                    Something that hasn't been mentioned is what about helping subsidize a nice young horse & making sure the breeders get paid/recognition? I am in the 25-35 wanting to go Adv. camp, but due to finances, the only horses I can afford are OTTBs (not that there's anything wrong with that - but I have seen some very nice purpose-bred horses, they start at $15K and I bet the breeders are basically breaking even on a 4 or 5 y.o. for that price).
                                    Blugal

                                    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      My reasoning?.......... We already give a grant (actually mentioned by someone else in this thread) but it seems to get little to no response every year. we wanted to find out if we are on the right track as far as what is really needed in the sport because maybe the lack of applicants was due to our grant just being so old it was really not needed where it is. Now I see that we aren't wrong that it really is probably just not advertised enough by the organization currently handling it. Now I know that maybe it just needs to be better handled. Thanks for all of your replies..... I appreciate it.
                                      Last edited by BigRuss1996; Dec. 12, 2007, 08:29 AM.
                                      "A little less chit-chat a little more pitter-pat"

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Having a 24 year old daughter struggling her way along, I'd say it is not easy to learn about grants, where they are available, how one applies, how they are awarded, etc. Where are they advertised? How does one find out about grants offered? Maybe some of your $ could go toward making them more readily accesible?
                                        Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X