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OTTB Stereotypes: What to do???

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  • OTTB Stereotypes: What to do???

    Current or previous sellers, owners and/or adoptees of Off the Track Thoroughbreds:

    Why is it that so many OTTB are stereotyped as being "nuts"?

    What should buyers, or just horse people in general, know or expect (either to know or as in the horse's behavior) BEFORE they get a OTTB?

    In your personal experince, do TB who have never seen a track end up trying to combat the same stereotype?

    What other stereotypes of OTTB have you heard and have you ever tried to speak up against it?

    How should you or would you go about educating someone who is already against the idea of OTTBs?

  • #2
    Because people with no business owning a OTTB 'rescue' them and they can't handle them. At all.

    Until it stops, the stereotype won't go away.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Skittles 4U View Post
      Current or previous sellers, owners and/or adoptees of Off the Track Thoroughbreds:

      Why is it that so many OTTB are stereotyped as being "nuts"?

      What should buyers, or just horse people in general, know or expect (either to know or as in the horse's behavior) BEFORE they get a OTTB?

      In your personal experince, do TB who have never seen a track end up trying to combat the same stereotype?

      What other stereotypes of OTTB have you heard and have you ever tried to speak up against it?

      How should you or would you go about educating someone who is already against the idea of OTTBs?
      OTTB's are stereotyped as being "nuts" for exactly the reason that kookicat said, because people who can't handle them some how end up with them.

      People should first and foremost have a KNOWLEDGEABLE trainer helping them with the OTTB, unless they themselves are a professional. Also they should do some research so that they know common practices at the track, because thats what the horse is used to. I had to show my OTTB's how to use an automatic waterer because they didn't understand what it was.

      Most people will automatically think that every thoroughbred has been on the track so yes, even thoroughbreds who have never been on a track have to combat the same stereotype as all the OTTBs.

      I find that eventers are the most welcoming to OTTB's because we work with them the most, and since I rarely venture out of eventing land I haven't heard of anything else.

      And if someone was against OTTB's all together I would probably send them to talk to Stuart Pittman.
      Chrissy

      RIP Beaming Sportsfield (1998-2012)

      Comment


      • #4
        The same reason every breed of animal gets stereotyped: because of the rampant idiocy of the people who own them. Unfortunately, it seems there are never ending masses of irresponsible, unknowledgeable animal owners out there perpetuating bad stereotypes by mishandling their animals. And since bad news seems to be louder than good news, no matter how many good owners are out there, it doesnt seem to change the fact that most people only end up hearing the bad.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Skittles 4U View Post

          How should you or would you go about educating someone who is already against the idea of OTTBs?
          Save your breath to cool your soup. I mention when any one raves about my wonderful boy that I took him off the track at age 6.
          A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame or money, but even practices it without any hope of doing it well.--G. K. Chesterton

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          • #6
            Tb's and fools

            Not every rider will get along with a T'bred

            Not every rider will get on with a D-Blood

            Why bother to open a closed mind--someone else likely will love an OTTB

            Better though is NRTB never been to Track TB! I have two love then but that TB is close to the surface on demand!

            as another poster noted

            Ride a thoroughbred anything else is just a horse

            Comment


            • #7
              I prove the stereotype wrong every time I ride my OTTB. He's the calmest, quietest TB I've ever seen. Although I have also owned the "stereotype" as well.... but even he could trail ride and walk on the buckle.

              LOOOOOVE my OTTBs.
              Yes, I ride a pony. No, he would not be ideal for your child. No, he is not a re-sale project...

              Comment


              • #8
                I ride hunters and jumpers, and we have about 5 OTTBs in our barn, including my retired hunter. I agree the stereotypes are annoying. People rarely realize that being on the track can have some benefits. While off track horses are usually forward and obviously need lots of retraining, they also IMO are often quite good about being around lots of activity, working around other horses, bathing, hosing, trailering, etc, and most have a good work ethic because they're used to having something to do and seem to enjoy having a job.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Everyone thought my OTTB was an Appendix! He has a great personality..People do not understand how they are trained, so you have to know that to retrain them...I would not trade mine for all the tea in China. We certainly have had our issues most being from a physical injury or Lyme but when we are on it is great!
                  Gotta love the look of Eagles and the heart of a Tb is hard to replace....
                  Mai Tai aka Tyler RIP March 1994-December 2011
                  Grief is the price we pay for love- Gretchen Jackson
                  "And here she comes. Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's ZENYATTA!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Outyougo View Post

                    Not every rider will get on with a D-Blood

                    Why bother to open a closed mind--someone else likely will love an OTTB
                    Yes, it is horrible to stereotype thoroughbred and people who do that are just close minded. But stereotyping warmbloods is just fine....

                    A few of the reasons thoroughbreds are stereotyped:

                    1-temperment is not important to a stellar racehorse, so there are quite a few tempermental thoroughbreds out there.

                    2-a really fit racehorse can be easily excitable and someone that is not aware of how fitness/extra energy can effect a horse may be taken aback by this.

                    3-some horses that come off the track have been handled wrong and have 'issues' that the average amateur cannot handle, but the unscrupulous trainer hands them off to an amateur just to get the horse out of his barn. (Before anyone looses their senses, I'm talking about bad trainers, not good trainers).

                    There are more reason, but that should be enough.

                    I can go into quarter horse stereotypes, warmblood stereotypes, Appaloosa stereotypes, etc. Just let it roll. Someone that is going to buy into the stereotype is not someone you want owning your horse anyway.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      stereotypes

                      i've decided that people who truly believe those stereotypes are seriously uneducated and it is perhaps better for the breed that they DON'T own one. it's their loss, and it saves a potentially wonderful horse from being mishandled by someone who has no idea how to retrain for their discipline after the racing career is over.

                      in my personal experience, my ottb is the most level headed, sane and UN-spooky horse under saddle that i have ever owned. her ground manners while being tacked and mounted left a few things to be desired but teaching race horses to stand quietly for tacking and mounting is simply not something that is important at the track. her athleticism and work ethic outweigh ANY issues that i may have had.

                      i also think people sometimes don't realize that these horses have had a j-o-b for basically their entire lives and they have lived with a regimen/schedule throughout their career. they tend to thrive with something to do and once they have transitioned from racing to riding/eventing/etc. they like to have work to do and mine enjoys human attention as well- which they are used to having! they are bred to be athletic and have been fit for their entire career- which seems to sometimes be misconstrued as "wild/crazy/forward/enter stereotype here". they are ATHLETES plain and simple. you don't keep nba basketball players locked in their closets to be still and quiet when they aren't playing- so who could expect an ottb to be still and quiet when kept in a stall all day and then lazy when under saddle.

                      i will probably never own anything other than an ottb, and i have no issue with saying they probably aren't for everyone, just like lazy heavy warmblood types and draft crosses arent my thing. i can appreciate them and ride them, i just don't want one.

                      so i'm stepping off my soapbox now. thanks.
                      Jazz- 4.9.01 OTTB, loved since 12.6.09
                      Skip- 3.3.91 APHA, i miss you buddy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        One of the big misconceptions is that OTTBs like the countryside & wide open spaces. Quite a lot from Mid West tracks live in a definitely urban environment. You could drive a 600 hp diesel tractor past my wife's OTTB mare & she wouldn't bat an eyelid but trees - or more specifically the wind in the trees - wow THAT was scary and don't mention butterflies. Eventually she became quite the country girl & dependable hunter that knew exactly where that lost hound was but the learning period was definitely challenging.

                        The other problem is caused by all those who buy an OTTB as the cheapest horse around without looking at the hair trigger responses, incredible stamina and sheer power which each one is endowed with - just not suitable for the average new (or worse, young) rider.
                        Brock
                        Brock n. (Anglo-Saxon) badger as in Brockenhurst, Brocklebank etc www.area35.us

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Urban Legends

                          Its a myth and misconception perpetuated by trainers who wish to sell over priced WB's to their clients whom they choose not to teach to actually ride a horse. But pilot a robot around.
                          Having to actually ride a real athlete who may have some energy and a brain is time consuming and frustrating.
                          Better to create and Urban Legend that judges won't pin TB's, they are nuts, unsound, to hard to ride/train.
                          Gee whiz what did we all ride or covet to ride before the WB invasion....OTTB

                          If you put a 7-13 year old people kid in a 12x12 box 23 hours a day feed it tons of Red bull, allow him/her to race around an oval 1X day and occasionally have an all out blow out in front of a huge stadium fulll of noise. What precentage will come home with out some residual issues for a breif period??

                          I currently have 20 yes count them 20 Tb's and OTTB's some for sale some for my own pleasure some paying boarders.
                          Not a bleeding heart rescue, sell alot and get plenty of WB owners converting back.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't really care about the temperament stereotypes. The only thing I really generalize about them is: get a really good Pre-Purchase exam. As you should with all horses, I've just known a lot of ones with soundness issues--as well as a lot without that had long, successful careers.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I am not enormously experienced, but I have met / ridden / worked with enough completely reasonable OTTBs that I never gave the stereotype a second thought. My first horse, whom I own now, was a 5 yr. old OTTB mare when I met her, and has been sensible and safe to handle for an amateur taking regular lessons most of that time. (extended stall rest was tough)

                              Anyone who can't absorb the information that all animals vary in their temperament is too dumb to help. There are hot stupid dangerous 15 year old QH geldings. There are bambi-like 4 yr. old OTTBs. Your mileage will vary.
                              I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
                              I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by skip916 View Post
                                in my personal experience, my ottb is the most level headed, sane and UN-spooky horse under saddle that i have ever owned. her ground manners while being tacked and mounted left a few things to be desired but teaching race horses to stand quietly for tacking and mounting is simply not something that is important at the track. her athleticism and work ethic outweigh ANY issues that i may have had.

                                i also think people sometimes don't realize that these horses have had a j-o-b for basically their entire lives and they have lived with a regimen/schedule throughout their career. they tend to thrive with something to do and once they have transitioned from racing to riding/eventing/etc. they like to have work to do and mine enjoys human attention as well- which they are used to having! they are bred to be athletic and have been fit for their entire career- which seems to sometimes be misconstrued as "wild/crazy/forward/enter stereotype here". they are ATHLETES plain and simple. you don't keep nba basketball players locked in their closets to be still and quiet when they aren't playing- so who could expect an ottb to be still and quiet when kept in a stall all day and then lazy when under saddle.
                                great point and completely true. nicely said

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  What do I do to help undo the stereotypes?
                                  I play with my OTTB. He's the barn hand's favorite horse at the farm, and he's not shy about telling people that. He ground ties, he's unflappable to anything, we can ride without tack, hop on bareback 30 seconds off the trailer...
                                  But they ARE sensitive, every last one of them, and if you aren't sensitive enough to pick up on it, they become hypersensitive and get labeled psycho.
                                  Frankly, there's a reason the quarterhorse was invented
                                  www.destinationconsensusequus.com
                                  chaque pas est fait ensemble

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Well, I dunno. When I got my boy 12 years ago, he was green, I was clueless.

                                    He is probably the least spookiest horse at our barn, albeit still very sensitive, and incredibly intelligent. I ride outdoors. At night. Bareback. With coyotes in the surrounding brush. This is the boy I rode at a schooling show to a score of 69% in an outdoor ring in Training 3 some years back, with a helicopter hovering just outside the ring.

                                    His pasture buddy is not quite as smart, not quite as sensitive, still very laid back, but not quite as unflappable. Was gelded at 12. His owner is developmentally challenged, and he takes care of her like nobody's business. He just knows. This is the sweetheart who, when my horse had a reaction to a strangles vaccine a few years ago, Would.Not.Leave.Him.Even.To.Eat. Can't top a buddy like that!

                                    Anyone who stereotypes any breed of horse is missing out on a potentially fabulous individual. Their loss.
                                    www.specialhorses.org
                                    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I live in 2 worlds - the track and the show community.

                                      The fact that green or novice owners browse through ads and find a pretty TB for sale on the cheap can be quite attractive. In some situations, the relationship may work for them, but most often it doesn't and they find themselves in over their heads simply because they're not educated.
                                      The myths about TBs is something I deal with in the show community. It's frustrating to hear, "TBs have bad feet", "TBs are hard keepers", "TBs are nervous and difficult to ride". For those myths, I have an honest and obvious answer to each one.
                                      After reading some responses posted here, it certainly makes me feel good to see those of you who appreciate and understand TBs.
                                      www.littlekentuckyfarm.com
                                      Thoroughbred Training and Sales

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Maybe its a good thing, save all the tbs for us "crazy" people who love them
                                        RIP Charlie and Toby

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