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Couple of older, low level event horses in New Hampshire looking for new homes....

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  • Couple of older, low level event horses in New Hampshire looking for new homes....

    Please see this thread:
    http://chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=244236 .
    "I'm not much into conspiracy theories but if everyone thinks alike you don't need a plot!" ~person from another bulletin board whose name has been long forgotten~

  • #2
    This is heartbreaking for me. My daughter and I donated one of these horses. We donated her for the BREEDING program. They bred her twice with frozen semen one cycle and she didn't take. So they put her in the school program. She was one of their best horses and has given her all for 8 or 9 years, in THEIR school program. Now they are emailing and posting everywhere about getting rid of her.

    Is this really the norm? Do schools use them up and then expect you to take them back or harass you about them? I think it's horrible. They should either guarantee these horses a good quality of life or stop accepting donations. I will NEVER donate another horse. This has been such a miserable experience, and a true nightmare for my daughter.

    Please think twice if you are considering donating your horse. It will come back to haunt you!
    Last edited by Mary in Area 1; Feb. 16, 2010, 03:05 PM. Reason: Correct the assumption that we used her for 8 or 9 years.
    \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mary in Area 1 View Post
      This is heartbreaking for me. My daughter and I donated one of these horses. We donated her for the BREEDING program. They bred her twice with frozen semen one cycle and she didn't take. So they put her in the school program. She was one of their best horses and has given her all for 8 or 9 years. Now they keep calling us and emailing and posting everywhere about getting rid of her.

      Is this really the norm? Do schools use them up and then expect you to take them back or harass you about them? I think it's horrible. They should either guarantee these horses a good quality of life or stop accepting donations. I will NEVER donate another horse. This has been such a miserable experience, and a true nightmare for my daughter.

      Please think twice if you are considering donating your horse. It will come back to haunt you!
      IMHO, they are being very responsible. They are doing their best to find an older horse a good home in a crappy economy. They have offered her back to you rather than failing to inform you, as I have heard other schools have done. Reading this board, UNH's behavior seems stellar in this situation. I have heard of other schools sending unwanted horses to auction. BTW, I have no relation to UNH.

      Comment


      • #4
        I guess it's a good thing you have your own farm so that you are in a good position to take her back.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mary in Area 1 View Post
          This is heartbreaking for me. My daughter and I donated one of these horses. We donated her for the BREEDING program. They bred her twice with frozen semen one cycle and she didn't take. So they put her in the school program. She was one of their best horses and has given her all for 8 or 9 years. Now they keep calling us and emailing and posting everywhere about getting rid of her.

          Is this really the norm? Do schools use them up and then expect you to take them back or harass you about them? I think it's horrible. They should either guarantee these horses a good quality of life or stop accepting donations. I will NEVER donate another horse. This has been such a miserable experience, and a true nightmare for my daughter.

          Please think twice if you are considering donating your horse. It will come back to haunt you!
          Are you going to take her back? I am sure she gave her all to you as well.
          “If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished?”
          ? Rumi






          Comment


          • #6
            I'm really amazed and disturbed by these responses. Yes, I have my own farm and it would be possible for me take her back. But that was not explained to me when I donated her--that they expected me to take her when they were "done" with her.

            How many of your daughters' retired horses are you supporting on your farm, Jan? I already have a few...

            Is this really what people expect from college programs? Do they never keep retired horses or have a protocol for retiring them? I mean, UNH has its own farm, too, and they have more room and help than I do to care for retired horses.
            \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo

            Comment


            • #7
              Look, another pot calling the kettle black!

              Originally posted by Mary in Area 1 View Post
              This is heartbreaking for me. My daughter and I donated one of these horses. We donated her for the BREEDING program. They bred her twice with frozen semen one cycle and she didn't take. So they put her in the school program. She was one of their best horses and has given her all for 8 or 9 years. Now they keep calling us and emailing and posting everywhere about getting rid of her.

              Is this really the norm? Do schools use them up and then expect you to take them back or harass you about them? I think it's horrible. They should either guarantee these horses a good quality of life or stop accepting donations. I will NEVER donate another horse. This has been such a miserable experience, and a true nightmare for my daughter.

              Please think twice if you are considering donating your horse. It will come back to haunt you!


              I am assuming that the 24 y.o. mare is the one that you are referring to in your ridiculous statement above. So she was about 16 when you donated her to the program and I bet she had "given her all" to you for quite some time, perhaps "8 or 9 years"? So I guess she was no longer competitive/sound for the work you wanted her to do, hence why you donated her to the "BREEDING" program. It seems as if they did something right by her because they had her sound enough for 8 or 9 more years in their riding program. Now they are looking to place her in a good, safe home for her retirement (same thing that YOU did!) and you are screaming foul? Do you have any idea how ridiculous and callous YOU are coming across to others? There is certainly no mention by you about what YOU are trying to do to help your old servant. Why don't YOU take her back? Where is YOUR responsibility to the mare? This is a "nightmare" for your daughter, how about the mare? Well, how lucky for both that UNH is offering you the mare so that YOU can make this better for your daughter and the mare and re-unite them at YOUR farm/expense.

              While I understand that not everyone can take an old horse back who needs a home, the OP comes across as a total HYPOCRITE for screaming foul that someone else is not doing something that SHE is ALSO not willing to do.

              I hope that UNH is successful in finding good, loving homes for all of these horses.
              Annabelle Mayr, Arcadia Farm
              Home of Fitz, Austria & Erin
              Now over the Rainbow Bridge: Daeo, Max, Finn, Jake, Seamus & Pleasure

              Comment


              • #8
                I would never donate my horse (or any horse) to a school, unless they signed papers saying the horse had a good, forever home with them (no "testing," either). Or, unless they promised to return the horse to me in good form for no cost.

                I have heard horror stories about donated horses being sold at auction to pay for other horses/programs, being used for "science projects," etc. They really are not truthful to people about what can/will happen to their horses.

                Unless an owner told the school they wanted to be contacted when the school was "done" with the horse, the school should not have contacted them. The schoool needs to find a home for horses it takes on. However, if a horse ends up at auction or being used for science projects, the previous owner cannot be upset about it, unless they had a contract and were told no such thing would ever happen to the horse.
                "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Do you expect them to keep the horses forever? What would you have them do? At least they aren't dumping them at auction like so many other schools.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry, but I can see Mary's point. It doesn't sound as if they contacted her one time to let her know they were trying to re-home the horse. That would be fine. It sounds as if they are repeatedly contacting her and bothering her about it. That is not OK!

                    She donated the horse for whatever reason. Yes, her daughter used this horse, but that doesn't mean they are responsible for it forever. They donated it for a good purpose, and there is nothing wrong with that. The school is now responsible for this horse, and they should find it a good home, which they are trying to do. How many of you would take back every horse you ever owned if the person, group, etc., that now has it doesn't want it anymore? Give me a break.

                    Now, Mary cannot be upset that they are trying to find another home for the horse. She cannot be upset if they send the horse to auction or straight to Mexico, for that matter, unless they signed an agreement that said they, personally, would give the horse a good, forever home.

                    (Personally, my horses all have forever homes, so I'll never have to worry about it. I recently traded a nasty mare I had for a short time for a gelding, but the mare went to a good home. And, yes, if they contacted me and said they were going to send the horse to a bad place if I didn't take it, I'd take it. But, I have the resources to do so. I'm not saying I wouldn't find the mare another home or even have her put down, because I hate the mare, but I would take her before I knowingly let something bad happen to her.)
                    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Perhaps they are calling her repeatedly in the hopes that they don't have to resort to sending the horse to auction? I'd call more than once too, because someone who is known to have cared for the horse once upon a time is probably a better bet than hoping a stranger will take in a retiree.

                      When you sell or donate a horse you have no control over what happens to it anymore. If you want control, don't transfer ownership.

                      Personally, if I were in that situation, I'd be busting my butt to find a place for the mare, or I'd take her back myself. If I really couldn't keep her and couldn't find a good spot for her to retire, I'd give her a pampered month or two and then euthanize her.

                      Far better that than going to auction.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just my opinion, of course - but I'd take her back if I cared anything about her and free lease her to someone with the understanding that I'd be her final home. My (very) small barn houses my 31-year old retired junior jumper who is slowly, but surely, losing his eyesight; the horse we adopted from another college because he was unsuitable for their community lesson program, we rehabbed and free-leased through the COTH giveaways.
                        Last edited by JanWeber; Feb. 16, 2010, 02:01 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Trust me on this--institutions of higher learning do NOT have the budgets to support equipment that is no longer useable. They "surplus" it. It's how the system works, especially state schools. I don't care how big their facility is, everything there is "property" and is dealt with the same way.

                          If they are calling at all to find a genuine retirement home, they are going above and beyond.

                          I don't see how anyone could expect one of these programs to provide a "forever" home. And if they did, and you were a taxpayer in that state, you'd scream bloody murder.
                          "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

                          Spay and neuter. Please.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mary in Area 1 View Post
                            Is this really what people expect from college programs? Do they never keep retired horses or have a protocol for retiring them? I mean, UNH has its own farm, too, and they have more room and help than I do to care for retired horses.

                            yes...I would not expect any college program to keep a horse for life and give them a retirement. You get the tax write off when you donate them. The good programs try and find homes for the horses or let you take them back when they are retired. Not so good programs...run them through the auction.
                            ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ADM7040 View Post
                              I am assuming that the 24 y.o. mare is the one that you are referring to in your ridiculous statement above. So she was about 16 when you donated her to the program and I bet she had "given her all" to you for quite some time, perhaps "8 or 9 years"? So I guess she was no longer competitive/sound for the work you wanted her to do, hence why you donated her to the "BREEDING" program. It seems as if they did something right by her because they had her sound enough for 8 or 9 more years in their riding program. Now they are looking to place her in a good, safe home for her retirement (same thing that YOU did!) and you are screaming foul? Do you have any idea how ridiculous and callous YOU are coming across to others? There is certainly no mention by you about what YOU are trying to do to help your old servant. Why don't YOU take her back? Where is YOUR responsibility to the mare? This is a "nightmare" for your daughter, how about the mare? Well, how lucky for both that UNH is offering you the mare so that YOU can make this better for your daughter and the mare and re-unite them at YOUR farm/expense.

                              While I understand that not everyone can take an old horse back who needs a home, the OP comes across as a total HYPOCRITE for screaming foul that someone else is not doing something that SHE is ALSO not willing to do.

                              I hope that UNH is successful in finding good, loving homes for all of these horses.
                              Wow, ADM, I don't know who you are or why you are so incredibly callous and rude, but you have totally misunderstood and misrepresented the situation.

                              We bought Keeper as a 12 year old. She competed with my daughter for 1.5 years until she was diagnosed with a very severe heart murmur and we were told to NEVER RIDE HER AGAIN as it would be very dangerous.

                              Naturally, we kept her and took very good care of her. As the next 3 years passed (while she was retired on our farm) she showed no progression of the heart problems.

                              She was not happy just being retired, so we considered her as a broodmare as she was very well bred. We took her back to Tufts and they agreed we might try breeding her. Most breeding farms did not want an older, maiden mare, so we bred her once and she produced a lovely filly (who we trained and sold.)

                              We then learned that UNH was looking for TB broodmares for their "Breeding Program". At the time, they had Pik L and wanted to breed him to nice TB mares. THAT was what we donated her for. She was not even supposed to be ridden AT ALL according to the vets. She was in impeccable condition and completely sound when we donated her, but the heart murmur prevented other situations, and she was young, healthy and loved having her filly.

                              We did the right thing by this mare, and I will make sure she either comes here or goes to another safe home. BUT, I do NOT appreciated being made a villian in a situation where we have always tried to take the very best care of this mare and find her the best home.

                              UNH did not follow the intent of the donation at all. I DO have the means to take her back, and I WILL. Not everyone CAN take back their donated horse, and I think it is wrong of schools to accept donations and not be held responsible for their retirements. THAT is my beef with UNH. What are you not understanding about that opinion?
                              \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                People need to know this then!

                                Originally posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
                                yes...I would not expect any college program to keep a horse for life and give them a retirement. You get the tax write off when you donate them. The good programs try and find homes for the horses or let you take them back when they are retired. Not so good programs...run them through the auction.

                                We did NOT get any tax write-off when we donated this horse. I could never even get them to send me a letter stating what we had agreed to beforehand. They kept telling me it had to come through "the administration" who never sent us anything.

                                Maybe you all knew this information that donated horses are usually used up and thrown out. I didn't. I was led to believe she would live a wonderful life as a broodmare in a top-notch program, not spend her life as a schoolie.

                                Hopefully, other people reading this thread will learn that is the norm for donated horses and will make a more informed choice for their horses. I truly hope some good will come out of this thread.
                                \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  that's ashame that you didn't know that then....did you ask the questions? Most of the programs that I researched before donating, you are able to get a tax write off (all schools you got one...some of the private programs no). You do also have to follow up and check on the horses. If they are not being used in the manner in which you agreed when you donated them....then you have to speak up and do something at that time.

                                  Most breeding programs will put the mares down or run them through an auction. Never heard of one that retired an old broodmare.

                                  I'm not saying you did anything wrong...and you are raising flags on issues and concerns when ever a person gives up ownership of a horse whether it is from selling them or donating them. But the obligation is on you to follow up if it is important to you.


                                  Hopefully others will do their homework but this is NOT unusual for most institutions. And it is actually really nice that they are making an effort to find them good homes.
                                  ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Did UNH tell you that they would keep her beyond her breeding years?

                                    Unfortunately colleges are not much different from private owners, in that whatever stipulations you place (such as not riding in your case) are almost impossible to enforce, and they too are reluctant to keep horses that aren't useful to them.

                                    My sister donated a horse to a college in the same area, with the vet restriction that she not jump (why she was donated instead of sold privately). Sure enough, she became a jumping lesson horse. A few years later, when she wasn't holding up, she was given to a student there. (Which I believe is many college's preferred retirement option--to see if a student would take them home).

                                    The 2 were happy together until she was no longer sound for riding at all, in her early 20s, and the student contacted my parents (who at the time had 1 kid in college, 1 just out, and were out of horses completely) to try to get them to take her back. They couldn't and I don't know what happened next.

                                    It would have been wonderful if the school had not jumped her and allowed her a longer life as a schoolie. Or if it had chosen to retire her. Or if the student had chosen to retire her. But at the same time, if my family was not willing/able to do so, we can't be that bitter that others didn't/couldn't either.

                                    I'm glad that your story will end better.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      It is a tax write off when you donate your horse to a school. Period. That is wierd/wrong that you didn't get one.

                                      Schools are not expected to keep retired horses and provide a forever home. Many are sent to auction, experimented on or just euthanized. That is the reality.

                                      I know this because I sent a TB mare to UC Davis for thier breeding program.

                                      You are an amazing person to take such good care of that mare and try your best to find the perfect situation for her (breeding program at UNH) I think the only mis-step is thinking that a school would take care of a retired/older horse that doesn't have a use anymore. They simply don't operate that way.

                                      Bless you for trying to find her a home again or providing her a home. It's too bad that UNH has put a bad taste in your mouth
                                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                      Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
                                      www.elainehickman.com
                                      **Morgans Do It All**

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        This is why some people put horses down rather than donating them. Some people can't sleep at night not being sure where the horse will end up down the road. Once a horse even leaves a rescue there is nor guarantee that it won't eventually end up in a kill pen. It is naive to think otherwise.

                                        Kudos to UNH for trying so vigorously to find great forever homes for these hard workers. Many don't even try....
                                        "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant

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