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Need Help Teaching a lesson (in an ag. classroom) on eventing

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  • Need Help Teaching a lesson (in an ag. classroom) on eventing

    I am going to school to become and ag teacher and one of my classes involves early student teaching. Its pretty simply, but I have to teach a lesson in one class before this semester end. The teacher of the class I am observing is going to let me teach her equine science class and she said I could teach about eventing. I wrote a speech that was 7 mins long last semester for Public Speaking but that wont be enough. It covered what eventing was and why it is dangerous (rotational falls kinda stuff)

    Can yall give me an idea on some things I can talk about?
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor

  • #2
    How it differs from other horse sports, how scoring works (penalty score for dressage), go through what is expected of horses in each phase and how that changes as they move up the levels. If you can find video of galloping horses, show the difference in speed between the mpm for BN-Advanced.

    The history of eventing, military background, when it became an olympic sport

    Photos of horses jumping "wow" fences, famous eventers.

    Origins of eventers- OTTB vs purpose bred sport horse, how you can evaluate an event horse prospect

    Comment


    • #3
      If 'ag' = agriculture then you could lecture on land usuage for the sport, (OK my IA farmer roots are showing), the benefits of portable fences (hay fields/pastures most of the time) vs permanent fences, cost to compete and the cost to put on an event.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you talk about the Olympics, talk about how men and women compete together, throw in the O'Connors.
        www.ncsporthorse.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I would be sure to focus on the all-around nature of the sport and how it demands that horse and rider be skilled in very different areas. Also point out how important this makes the relationship between horse and rider. You can also note the wide variety of horses that are successful in the sport--maybe show pictures of both Teddy and a big guy like Biko. Honestly I'd skip the whole thing about the O'Connors, it distracts from the real story, which is that men and women compete against each other on an equal playing field. Good luck, sounds like a fun project!

          Comment


          • #6
            Since this is an equine science class I would do an overview of the sport - ie.compare to a triathalon and I would also suggest discussing how the rider needs to know the horse's body...how important it is to make sure the animal is fit & how to get them (and the rider) fit for the upper levels, checking heart, resp; the importance of cooling out etc... You could make a fabulous slide presentation

            Comment


            • #7
              Lesson outline:

              1) History
              a) cavalry training
              b) functions and reasons for each test/phase

              2) Modern sport
              a) requirements of the sport
              b) long format vs. short format

              3) Horse conditioning/physiology
              a) preparation of the high performance horse
              1) vet care
              2) training
              3) common injuries and their treatments
              b) Maintaining a high performance horse
              1) stable management
              2) diet

              4) Current risks in the sport
              a) Horse risks
              1)recent incidents
              2) possible causes tied back to 3.a.3, 3.b.2, 2.b and 1.b
              b) rider risks
              1) recent incidents

              5) Future of the sport

              You should be able to get at LEAST an hour.

              Reed

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Gosh Reed! YOu have this mapped out! haha no need for me create a lesson plan! You have just done it for me!

                ETA a THank you to everyone!
                *Paige*
                ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
                R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's my job. I do it for my grad students all of the time. You are quite welcome and good luck!

                  Reed

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    I didn't know you were a professor! You are quite the brave soul! LOL IDK if I could teach college kids... They would intemidate me.. but I am also 5 ft tall and the high school kids get to me sometimes! haha Where do you teach?
                    *Paige*
                    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
                    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                      Lesson outline:

                      1) History
                      a) cavalry training
                      b) functions and reasons for each test/phase

                      2) Modern sport
                      a) requirements of the sport
                      b) long format vs. short format

                      3) Horse conditioning/physiology
                      a) preparation of the high performance horse
                      1) vet care
                      2) training
                      3) common injuries and their treatments
                      b) Maintaining a high performance horse
                      1) stable management
                      2) diet

                      4) Current risks in the sport
                      a) Horse risks
                      1)recent incidents
                      2) possible causes tied back to 3.a.3, 3.b.2, 2.b and 1.b
                      b) rider risks
                      1) recent incidents

                      5) Future of the sport

                      You should be able to get at LEAST an hour.

                      Reed
                      Eh... I would assume this is a high school class? I teach 8th graders, many of whom are in the high school ag classes, and honestly, I think they'd eat you alive with a lecture like that. Teeneagers do not have the attention span of grad students. Grad students only have the attention span for that because they're intensely interested in a subject already. If you try to talk for an entire hour, or even show a brief video first then talk, you'll lose them. They won't care about long format-vs-short format, etc. My guess is that in a Tennessee high school ag class (if it's anything like a Texas high school ag class!), most kids are into western stuff or just "like horses" and would be turned off by a lecture that was too in-depth on a foreign concept. Most teenagers in general can't handle more than a few pieces of new info at a time.

                      My advice would be to intersperse video and "talk" (not long lectures) as much as possible, and keep it interactive. Start by having the kids tell you anything they already know (or think they know) about eventing. No need to correct misconceptions yet- the rest of your lesson should take care of that. Besides, changing a teenager's mind is like banging your hea dinto a tree! Next, show them a brief "spills and thrills" type video to introduce the subject (possily old footage of military days if possible), then give them five minutes or so to write their own list of questions about the sport based on that brief video (have them set this aside for later). Then tell them in a sentence what eventing is and give a BRIEF (i.e. one minute) explanation of the military history of the sport. Show a short dressage video followed by a short talk on the very BASICS of what dressage is and it's purpose in the sport (not going into details of movements or too much about scoring)... then show a video of cross country showing lots of action and the variety of obstacles that one would see at the upper levels (ditches, banks, water, jumping over flatbed trailers and trucks and large wooden ducks and strange things like that), followed by a short talk on the cross country phase and what it is intended to test. Then show a short stadium video and explain the basics of stadium as it is related to the overall sport. After you've given this basic outline and shown a couple videos, you'll probably have taken half an hour. Most classes aren't quite a full hour. Now is when they pull out the questions they wrote earlier. They get to ask you whatever they want about the sport, and you answer on the fly as best as possible. Don't be afraid to say, "I don't know" if you really don't. Have some well-illustrated books on hand that they can look into if they want. A lot of their questions will likely be about your own experiences with eventing, and that might lead into some of the details you left out, like levels, etc. I would bet the teacher has some questions to ask you or ideas to throw in if the kids don't have many- she wants you to be successful. In case you need to fill in extra time, you may want to prepare something on the dangers, safety concerns or controversies in eventing. I know you probably don't want to emphasize the negatives and give them a bad impression, but this is an opportunity for the kids to then debate the issues (in a very basic fashion- is it 'fair' to the horse; are the rider risks worth it, etc.) In fact, you may want to ask them these questions as a wrap-up activity. Since they're interested in horses already, they likely already have a vague opion. Opinions are ok, even if you disagree. If they get involved, they'll get more out of it and your lesson will be more successful than just a boring lecture. Alternatively, if you're not comfortable encouraging debate or emphasizing negatives, you can fill any dead time with talk of Olympics, etc, which may be interesting to teenagers.

                      I guarantee that if you keep it interactive, use plenty visuals, and stick to the "big ideas," the evaluations you get from your mentor teacher will be much better than if you just lecture. Your goal is for the kids to learn something and get interested, not just to fill time. If you're lucky and keep their attention, you may just end up with a group of young volunteers at the next local horse trial!!!
                      Last edited by archieflies; Oct. 17, 2009, 06:17 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        More general tips I thought of:

                        Bring in all your videos the day before, after school, and test them ALL out on the video equipment you will be using. You don't want to be caught with any last minute surprises. Have them all prepared and cued up so you don't have to search through files or fastforward and rewind... those are the times the kids will be behind you throwing spitballs if they have to wait!

                        Also, be careful if you use Powerpoint. I'm sure your education classes have thoroughly covered Powerpoint, but some trained teachers STILL think it's appropriate to use colorful backgrounds, clipart, wacky transitions, and 400 words per page. Simple color schemes, quality illustrations, basic transitions and no more then 15 words per slide... if you use Powerpoint at all. I personally think the devil invented Powerpoint, and I sleep through Powerpoint presentations even if it's something I'm interested in.

                        Oh, and don't stress out too much. Even though I say the kids will "eat you alive" for certain things, most students (even the very tough students in my very tough district) are pretty understanding of student teachers. They can sympathize with you as a student in an uncomfortabel situation. It was surprising to me at first, but I watched a student teacher struggle last year, and even the bad kids really seemed to go easy on her. They really do WANT you to do well.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          archieflies,

                          I absolutely agree that teaching at the college level is very different than K12. Thanks for a more in depth methodology. I learned a bit as well!

                          Rescue Rider, I am a professor at the Colorado School of Mines and the University of Colorado, School of Medicine.

                          Reed

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Cool, I've never heard of Colorado School of Mines! I'm scanning the website, and it looks pretty cool! I love engineering because it is SO far from what my mind is capable of understanding!

                            Oddly, though, I've become way TOO capable of understanding the teenage mind, and that's scary. I kind of like lecturing (don't tell- it's a secret) and would love to move up to college level someday!

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