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Event Riders......Where is the credit????

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  • Event Riders......Where is the credit????

    At my daughters local "A" Hunter/Jumper barn they look down on me as an event rider. Almost like we are "lower class." I feel we deserve more credit in the equestrian world! After all we compete in three sports over a few days on one horse. What are your thoughts? Has anyone else gone through this?
    God Bless

  • #2
    Chalk it up to the snootiness of equestrian sports. Not so much in eventing with the REAL eventers, though, thank goodness.

    Frankly I'd like to see an A rated WHatever try to take my horse around a preliminary course...at preliminary speed, and not come back white as a ghost (if they come back at all) Wouldn't do that to my horse though!

    just my opinion

    Comment


    • #3
      I just quietly smile and nod while enjoying my $2500 horse when people walk around with their noses stuck up in the air.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a couple of friends from the "other" side, and have to say they are not all snooty, and while I can ride a preliminary XC course, I can't ride a 3' course like a hunter. It's actually kind of hard to get 8 perfect fences with perfect striding between each.

        My friends who like hunters like the perfectionist aspects of it - "how perfect can I be this time". They don't like going fast. I would rather go fast, and perfectionism isn't my strong suit.

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, eventing dressage quality has historically lagged behind pure dressage standards. And the show jumping phase of eventing typically features courses that are less technical than the show jumping courses set at A shows. So it is understandable that some people who specialize in dressage or jumpers may think of eventers as "jack of all trades, master of none".

          Of course WE know that coaxing a horse with xc on its mind through a dressage test is difficult. And show jumping a tired horse who has already done dressage and xc is not the same as show jumping at a jumper show. But those little important details probably escape a lot of non-eventers.

          For what it is worth, I've ridden with a couple h/j trainers on my jumping, and I've never felt like I've been looked down upon because I event, and I've never been made to feel unwelcome in any way. The only time I can even think of an occasion where my eventing was even brought up is when I fell off at a hunter clinic. There was a moment of silence, and then the trainer announced: "She's OK! She's an eventer! They're tough!".

          Comment


          • #6
            I guess its each person's point of view. I have had sj and xc rounds that have been "perfect". I find it less interesting (in my point of view) to ask my self "how perfect will I be today" than it is to ask myself, " how many bruises will I have today?" My event horse can go like a hunter, too ...zzzzzzzzzz....

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 3dayeventing
              At my daughters local "A" Hunter/Jumper barn they look down on me as an event rider. Almost like we are "lower class." I feel we deserve more credit in the equestrian world! After all we compete in three sports over a few days on one horse. What are your thoughts? Has anyone else gone through this?
              Those are not real horse people then....I worked with one of the best jumper trainers in the world and he didn't look down on event riders. He looked down on bad riders regardless of whether they were a jumper, hunter or eventer. One of the problems comes when riders, particularly young riders are not exposed to good horsepeople and not exposed to many different disciplines. Things can be learned from them all. At one time, many of the top Jumpers rode chase horses or evented and many eventers rode jumpers (many still do) etc.....those good horsepeople recognized the things they could learn from other disciplines and how to use those things to improve themselves and their horses in their chosen specialty. But riders who have only done or seen one type of riding can get snotty and closed minded....those are also often riders who do not grow as riders and trainers and do not become successful (at a high level) in their discipline.
              ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

              Comment


              • #8
                For the OP's snooty h/j riders - go find either Thrills and Spills 2 or I think there is a Mark Todd eventing video - with his infamous Burghley or Badminton one stirrup ride - IMO that is certainly one of the most fantastic feats of riding ever seen - that and Bruce Davidson at Rolex a few years back - sit those H/J'ers down to watch - if that doesn't garner some respect, nothing will.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 3dayeventing
                  At my daughters local "A" Hunter/Jumper barn they look down on me as an event rider. Almost like we are "lower class." I feel we deserve more credit in the equestrian world! After all we compete in three sports over a few days on one horse. What are your thoughts? Has anyone else gone through this?

                  I would bet these are not jumper riders (who are usually very good horseman), but hunter riders that have this attitude. To me the a true test of a horseman is not how pretty they can look on a horse that goes perfectly, but to have them take a green horse out in an open field and train it.

                  A long time ago, I used to teach a top rated A show hunter rider (she wanted to learn some dressage) , and she admitted to me that she was afraid of going down hills. Walk was ok, trot downhill terrified her, and canter was out of the question. She also admitted that with her and everyone she knew, if a horse gave them trouble or was hard to train they would sell it to an eventer. That says something right there!
                  http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Beleive it or not we get more credit than we used to! I've had many hunters and dressage riders give me respect for being an eventer. Our sport is better understood by the other disciplines now than it was 10 to 15 yrs ago.

                    To be honest us eventers tend to look down on the other disciplines as well. We say hunter/jumpers are just too scared to event and dressage riders are scared to jump. Though I am in awe of a hunter rider that can jump around a 4ft course like it's a sunday stroll or a dressage rider that can make the hottest horse look relaxed and dreamy to ride. Though I personally respect a good rider from both of the other disciplines I am biased towards eventers. I still think eventers are the best. After all we are more well rounded right? If not we should be, it's not all about the cross-country. I like having to try to be the best at three types of riding. I feel like I could easily switch over to hunters or dressage and not have to do much catching up to fit in.
                    http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/pinkngreen

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=lstevenson]\. To me the a true test of a horseman is not how pretty they can look on a horse that goes perfectly, but to have them take a green horse out in an open field and train it.

                      RIGHT ON!

                      Speaking of going downhill. I wonder if, at Loudoun this fall, they'll have that downhill to a roundbale on the P and I xc course!? YIPES! ;-)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [quote=InVA]
                        Originally posted by lstevenson
                        \. To me the a true test of a horseman is not how pretty they can look on a horse that goes perfectly, but to have them take a green horse out in an open field and train it.

                        RIGHT ON!

                        Speaking of going downhill. I wonder if, at Loudoun this fall, they'll have that downhill to a roundbale on the P and I xc course!? YIPES! ;-)

                        Oh, yes that's usually always on the course. Don't worry! It's not as bad as it looks. It rides great! Because of the drop the horses usually do lower themselves and rub the roundbale. It makes it feel not very big at all.
                        http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Seemed to be years ago that horses not capable of doing hunters or jumpers then became eventers - I don't think this is true anymore at all. H/J have the potential of earning prize money at competitions, seldom to event riders have an opportunity to win prize money - which make the value of H/J greater.

                          Over the years I for one have become more interested in other disciplines and found it amazing how for instance if you watch Reining you can see the basics of dressage..

                          I will say the one thing eventers have over H/J is that trainers cannot school (i.e. ride) your horse or show your horse at the competition grounds, you or your trainer cannot say to the starter - Oh I have to wait for my trainer, nor does event management offer to hold up x-country and dressage because of "trainer conflict" at show jumping..

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=lstevenson]
                            Originally posted by InVA


                            Oh, yes that's usually always on the course. Don't worry! It's not as bad as it looks. It rides great! Because of the drop the horses usually do lower themselves and rub the roundbale. It makes it feel not very big at all.
                            I know! I jumped it once - the other time I ran P there they took it off the course. My horse came down the hill to it and started backing off as if to say, "er...mommy you don't really mean to be aiming at that roundbale do you?" and he pretty much landed at the bottom of the hill with me literally at the buckle! ha! it does jump well you just have to keep your eyes up! HA!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Do the following:
                              1. Find the issue of the Practical Horseman magazine where George Morris gushes all about how great event riders are. (I think it was May? - not sure).
                              2. Make a big copy - BIG copy - of the comments in the equitation clinic about how great eventers are, and get it poster size at your Walmart store copy machine.
                              3. Tape it up on the tack room door of the barn!
                              There! That ought to work!
                              Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
                              Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Us vs. Them thread #1,345

                                Do we really need another "us vs. them" thread?
                                How is the original post -- or many of these answers -- any different from the looking-down-their-noses that the H/J folks do? Every sport takes skills, and every sport requires actually *doing* it to really appreciate what skill is involved.
                                I evented just for the Halibut.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  NeverTime, If I didn't have first had experience with rude, stuck up hunter/jumper/whatever the heck they do riders I would agree with you. My horses live on a very large farm where there are race horses, some hunter riders, and a handful of event riders. We all rent out our respective barns. I also live on the property. the farm is in a small town. The hunter riders NEVER smile, wave, say hello, how are you or go to hell (I guess that part is big of them) . I was once snidely told, "yeah, we can tell you event." ( I guess because of my helmet.)
                                  My horse was referred to as a common eventer and he's one of the nicest event horses in the area (if I do say so myself, I'm so stuck up eh?) ;-)
                                  We all have bad days but their behavior is consistent and it includes the trainers and their clients. I have to laugh though when the clients ride up to the ring with the trainers in a golf cart and their grooms lead the horses on foot. And still they find nothing to smile about? HA! Now THAT'S horsemanship!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Back in the dark ages - when black hunt coats were "in" in hunters, I worked for a trainer that always had a string of new ottbs every year. I would ride one or two and show them at his stupid h/j shows, and he allowed me to do jumpers and events with some of the not-so-hunter horses.

                                    Those Hunter Princesses used to make fun of me, look down at me - mostly because I had no money :-p and I could ride their horses better then they could at half their age. I was told I had horrible equitation (yes, well when I was riding half broken horses I was being effective and not sitting pretty!) boy was it so much fun to kick their @sses in eq classes, esp because I was always riding green horses and theres were seasoned h/j horses.

                                    When picking out a barn when I finally was able to afford my own horse I specifically picked out a small, laid back area with a nice indoor and a nice outdoor and lots of turnout. I love everyone at the barn, I'm pretty sure no one talks about me behind my back (honestly I couldn't care less), certainly no one says to my face how ugly i ride!

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      I have to admit we do get more credit now, however when I show up to my daughters barn they are only nice as they dont want to bite the hand that feeds them. My daughters father (ex-husband) is very much into the "look at me" scene!

                                      When she rides with me she tacks her own horse etc. When she goes to my shows she helps groom, water etc. When she goes to H/J show's she just shows up dressed and ready to go, the grooms take care of everything. It's tough to teach kids balance these days.

                                      I was watching one of her lessons the other day and I could'nt help but to over hear a few teens talking about how wealthly they were and how they lived in the top 1% of the highest income earners in the US.

                                      I guess maybe things are different now days. Who knows. I will do my best to teach her good values and morals.
                                      God Bless

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        InVA,

                                        That is so funny I love it. I would love to watch them attempt to get my guy around any course! Like you said though, I wouldnt do that to my horse! They are just showing their own personal insecuitys in my opinion! Who is really the one that is happy?
                                        Originally posted by InVA
                                        NeverTime, If I didn't have first had experience with rude, stuck up hunter/jumper/whatever the heck they do riders I would agree with you. My horses live on a very large farm where there are race horses, some hunter riders, and a handful of event riders. We all rent out our respective barns. I also live on the property. the farm is in a small town. The hunter riders NEVER smile, wave, say hello, how are you or go to hell (I guess that part is big of them) . I was once snidely told, "yeah, we can tell you event." ( I guess because of my helmet.)
                                        My horse was referred to as a common eventer and he's one of the nicest event horses in the area (if I do say so myself, I'm so stuck up eh?) ;-)
                                        We all have bad days but their behavior is consistent and it includes the trainers and their clients. I have to laugh though when the clients ride up to the ring with the trainers in a golf cart and their grooms lead the horses on foot. And still they find nothing to smile about? HA! Now THAT'S horsemanship!
                                        God Bless

                                        Comment

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