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After a show day... what do you do?

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    After a show day... what do you do?

    As the title says, After a show day... what do you do?

    As some of you know from my other post, we completed our first full Prelim event.

    Is there anything you give your horse after an event? Banamine or Bute?

    I Iced and poulticed his legs after I gave him a vetrolin bath. He absolutely loves those baths, and his legs appreciate the extra love. Curious if you help their bodies relax for the night after a one day event?

    Thoughts?

    #2
    I don't give banamine or bute after a show day - I usually just hack them out though. IMHO the worst thing you can do after a tough day is not move, so I hack them out at the walk to keep them from getting stiff and sore. They also live outside 24.7, so that helps - if they're the type to keep their feet moving in T/O I might give them the day off but the lazy ones are hacked at the walk. I'd absolutely be hacking them if they were at a boarding situation where they're stalled half the day.

    I have in the past rubbed their backs/necks with Sore-No-More or some other brace/liniment, and I have packed hooves with Magic Cushion if the ground was harder than usual. Poultice I only do if I know that the event was extra trying, but I'm in Area 1 and most events are 1 day and on semi-flat terrain, which is business-as-usual for us. If the event was maxed or close to it and super hilly, they do get poulticed that night.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012

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      #3
      I typically do ice/ poultice/ pack feet, but once we get home they get turned out. I don't generally give Bute/ Previcox (wouldn't give Banamine for this kind of thing anyway) unless they are staying in overnight or they have a pre-existing condition/ new injury.

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        Original Poster

        #4
        One thing I was thinking, I wouldn't want to Bute them or something in case something shows up the following day.

        He usually gets turned out right when he gets home to move around a bit, then is out early the next morning all day until dark at night.

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          #5
          Originally posted by LadyB View Post
          One thing I was thinking, I wouldn't want to Bute them or something in case something shows up the following day.

          He usually gets turned out right when he gets home to move around a bit, then is out early the next morning all day until dark at night.
          one of the reasons I hack the day after is so I can feel and see if there is any soreness going on or something brewing. IMHO it's okay to be a little sore after a big day, but lame or stiff is something else.
          AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012

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            #6
            One day and we're home at the end of it? Give him dinner, pull his wraps, and kick him out! If he has to stay in for any reason, he stays in wrapped. Now, Toby did not find prelim terribly hard on himself (ask DC about trying to walk him back from show jumping one time ), but for an older horse with some mileage or some issues, I could see a little bute or banamine being a nice thing (I certainly need some advil on occasion). I would still kick them out, though. Hacking depends on the horse. Some of my horses have really needed the hack the day after. Some, like Toby, just needed a day to be obnoxious and full of himself and beat the crap out of his pasture mates before returning to his normal life.
            Amanda

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              #7
              I give Ulcergard the day before, the day of, and the day after. Also ice his fronts at the show, then Magic Cushion in his feet once he's on the trailer so the shavings keep it packed in! (In Area II, 90% of the time the ground is rock hard). In the summer, I turn him out when we get home (usually nighttime) and give him 1 g of bute in his dinner. He always gets the day after off -- also for my sake, sometimes I can barely move the next day!
              Blog
              Translation
              fri [fri:] fritt fria (adj): Free
              skritt [skrit:] skritten (noun): Walk

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                #8
                Totally depends on the horse. My youngsters I wrap as soon as the day is over, and keep them on until the next morning if they are staying in a stall. I poultice anything jumping reasonably big but not my current horse yet, who is only jumping Novice-sized stuff for the most part. If he has a big day with a clinician or something I will poultice. I also do Magic Cushion or poultice feet, depending on what products I have on hand.

                Icing I don't do until the horse is jumping big fences, but I do cold hose everything for 10 minutes front and back if I am in a place where that is feasible. Some places it would hog up a hose too much so I hose for a minute or two and then graze, and wrap when dry.

                I'll do a liniment bath on occasion but I don't think it really does anything. My current horse breaks out from Vetrolin and Absorbine unless they are so dilute they are useless, so I skip that with him. At home I still do Vetrolin baths on my other horses sometimes because I like the smell myself. I ordered some Sore No More to see if it is better for the one horse.

                I don't give bute as a standard protocol but I will give it if the circumstances indicate I should. Like a horse that has a rough moment and might be sore, or an older horse I would absolutely bute. I used to bute my big jumpers when they got older, as a matter of course to make them happy in their work. When young they don't need it but when they start to have minor issues that are being controlled, absolutely a bute can make them feel that their show day wasn't a punishment. It's like me taking Advil on a show day now that I'm not young anymore! Want them to feel like a million bucks after they've done something stressful on their old bodies.

                The young horses I expect to not be particularly sore if they were properly fit, so no point in giving them bute. It comes down to judgment and horsemanship.

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                  #9
                  I'm somewhat old school and only show in the spring and fall. Also, I only do one day shows. So, at the show he is given a bath to cool off when we are done. I make sure we are around long enough after the show to allow him to get a good drink. One horse used to get robaxin before getting on the trailer. The current horse goes home and gets turned out for a few hours. Then he comes in for dinner. The legs, feet, etc. get checked. He does get bute for dinner then back out he goes.

                  I think the best thing for them is wandering the pastures grazing.
                  A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it.

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                    #10
                    I usually don't hack or ride the next day, unless we're still at the show or they are stalled for another reason- then I will hack and have a trot to see how they feel. If it's a one-day show and we are home that night, he has already been iced and wrapped at the show, so he either gets unwrapped and turned out for the night, or stays wrapped overnight and goes out in the morning. If the ground is hard or he had any sort of incident (like a hard knock to a fence) he gets a quarter previcox with dinner.

                    I always jog up or lunge the next day to check soundness, and check legs very carefully. Depending on the horse and circumstances, they might get wrapped again on the day after (for the day or overnight, depending on when their stall time is). Usually a hand graze so I can be sure they've done some wandering about. Lots of cookies

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by LadyB View Post
                      As the title says, After a show day... what do you do?
                      Drink.

                      Comment

                        Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by Winding Down View Post
                        Drink.


                        My poor mom, she demanded a bottle of wine after our day.. we finished at 12pm LOL.

                        I have always Poulticed my horses legs, and always will. I feel like my icing isn't good enough, I use the Ice Horse boots, so far they are decent, but I want even colder out of them. I only ice once at the show, then poultice before he gets on the trailer. He's a good drinker, but I will also give him BCAA to be safe.

                        I can't believe how tired he was after though, he seemed quite pooped. His cool down from cross was super fast, barely breathing hard, and didn't require too much cooling out. He just seemed mentally tired. Even the next day. Who knew!

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                          #13
                          Not even sure my 2 cents are worth that much, but there are two answers..

                          Before: (Aka late 1990's, competing Prelim and up) I would poultice and bring home and let them stay in for the night and rest and resume turnout and movement the next day. Maybe a gram of bute with evening feed.

                          Now: (Competing Novice and BN) I bring them home, nice bath, maybe some liniment and back they go to 24/7 turnout. Only poultice and stay in if they've done a lot. They live in constantly changing fields and one is flat while the others are hilly. The hilly fields are best for when they're tired as they have to move to get their grass, then shed, and finally their water. (Not so close together)

                          I would give Gastrogard or Ulcergard if I am shipping more than 4-5 hours, but not for the local stuff unless I have a known ulcery horse. I try not to give bute unless I have to. And I really like giving them the day after off and pony them on the next day for a hack without weight on their back. (But admittedly I have enough horses that I can do that)

                          ~Emily
                          "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries

                          Comment


                            #14
                            What do we do after the show?

                            Me and Sterling hit the town. Nothing like a good Pub crawl to put into perspective the absolute drumming each and every dressage judge is giving us this year. Sterling can sometimes hit the hard stuff, it's the Irish in him, and when I start to hear mutters about, "locked my ass" or "you want bending? Bend this!" I know it is time we get home. Once the hangover clears out it is time to get back to work and see if we can shave another half point from the mind of Cruella De Judge.

                            As well, a long washing/cooling if its hot, day off, pick it up the next day, but he's got good hooves, strong legs and we care at Novice, so not pounding it quite as hard. Sterling is 24/7 outdoor and moves around a good bit, so the day off is more to let his brain reset.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I have a sturdy soul, mentally and physically, who has the most active brain of any horse I've ever ridden. We are competing locally (one day, 1-2 hour hauls) at n and t. I like to ice on the way home (shipping boots doubling as ice boots). His legs are cool and tight when we unload. Back out to the 70 acre field he goes. They move all around as a herd every day and it has terrain, so that's just as good as a hack.

                              I think at this point if I detected any soreness or stiffness after the competition I'd evaluate both the day and whether he needed chiro or any other professional attention. I wouldn't give bute unless I really felt something unusual had happened.
                              The big man -- my lost prince

                              The little brother, now my main man

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                                #16
                                We do mostly one days (novice), and I just toss her out in the field when we get home.

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  For those who use Previcox intermittently, I thought it worked best on a daily regime because it takes time to build up in the system? When I started my guy on it my vet told me not to expect instant results because it takes time. In fact we stopped giving it because it didn't seem to do anything in the 3+ months we had him on it.
                                  runnjump86 Instagram

                                  Horse Junkies United guest blogger

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                                    #18
                                    If I was riding at your level I would likely poultice (race horse style: LOTS of it on the legs from below the knee and on the fetlock, not that half-assed thin coat of poultice on the legs that I see eventers do and that is usually warm and often dry in the morning) but turnout and handwalking or a hack next day also priority. Can't lie around on a couch after a workout and expect to ever loosen up again!

                                    Comment


                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by JP60 View Post
                                      What do we do after the show?

                                      Me and Sterling hit the town. Nothing like a good Pub crawl to put into perspective the absolute drumming each and every dressage judge is giving us this year. Sterling can sometimes hit the hard stuff, it's the Irish in him, and when I start to hear mutters about, "locked my ass" or "you want bending? Bend this!" I know it is time we get home. Once the hangover clears out it is time to get back to work and see if we can shave another half point from the mind of Cruella De Judge.

                                      As well, a long washing/cooling if its hot, day off, pick it up the next day, but he's got good hooves, strong legs and we care at Novice, so not pounding it quite as hard. Sterling is 24/7 outdoor and moves around a good bit, so the day off is more to let his brain reset.

                                      Comment

                                        Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by devvie View Post
                                        If I was riding at your level I would likely poultice (race horse style: LOTS of it on the legs from below the knee and on the fetlock, not that half-assed thin coat of poultice on the legs that I see eventers do and that is usually warm and often dry in the morning) but turnout and handwalking or a hack next day also priority. Can't lie around on a couch after a workout and expect to ever loosen up again!
                                        Good news is I worked 9 years at a race barn, they taught me all I need to know about leg care. It was the worst and best time of my life LOL. The most education you could possibly learn about horses and care. But I love to put on a ton of poultice Above the knee down, and above the hock down.

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