• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Wear your vests and helmets kiddos!! I'll tell you why.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wear your vests and helmets kiddos!! I'll tell you why.

    Because they can save your butt. That's why. Even when you think all is good in the stars...you find your A$$ on the ground.

    I had to send one of my young adult students off in an ambulence this weekend.
    Not a fun thing for a teacher. Not fun at all.
    The what if's, and what could I have done, what did I do wrong, I'm not a good coach, of course haunts me now.
    I'm a semi pro and I help only on special request. So I'm relatively new to falls of kiddos/students and such.

    And the reality of it is, it happens. And in this case, now that I know what she doesn't know, I can prepare her for the next tough similar situation. But I feel like I should have randomly known what was about to happen before it happened. Coaches are caretakers in a sense. And I failed.

    People often look at me crooked because no matter what I"m riding/how old/how much training ect I wear my vest and my helmet. It's not even up for discussion.
    I ride a lot of well broke trail horses and such but no matter what- that vest goes on. Even in 110* weather.

    My student would have been in pretty good shape after her fall if she had her vest on.
    She was ejected from her little OTTB (who apparently had a track flashback or something) at a fairly quick speed and when she hit the ground she slid a good 15 meters and wrapped herself around an arena fence post.

    She was bruised black and blue in the little baby ribb area within a few minutes. I made her lay still and called 911 because who knows what could have been bruised or fractured (spleen, kidney, plelvis).

    Turns out she's just bruised right at the base of her rib cage.
    The first thing she said was, "damn, should have had my vest on".

    Now lil ol me can't make vests mandatory but I highly promote them. And I know a student that won herself hand galloping lessons and will hopfully be wearing her vest from now on.

    Wear your protective gear everyone. It really can save you from heartache and pain.
    : )

    That's it. That is my blog for the day.
    Happy Eventing and gear up!
    Kristen Wertz
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

  • #2
    Originally posted by purplnurpl View Post
    I ride a lot of well broke trail horses and such but no matter what- that vest goes on. Even in 110* weather.
    That makes two of us.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      ROFLMAO.

      Sorry. I just saw a mental picture of JER on a fat QH plunking along in an Exo!!

      : )
      http://kaboomeventing.com/
      http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
      Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by purplnurpl View Post
        People often look at me crooked because no matter what I"m riding/how old/how much training ect I wear my vest and my helmet. It's not even up for discussion.
        I ride a lot of well broke trail horses and such but no matter what- that vest goes on. Even in 110* weather.
        I just gained even more respect for you, Kristen. Safety vests have saved me so many times from becoming complete mush (snoopy knows what I mean on this one... ).

        A bunch of trail riders went by the other day (sans helmet, with just sneakers, you know the type), and I received the strangest looks and laughs as I was schooling a student's old QH, gussied up in safety equipment to the nines. Just made it that much more enjoyable.

        Does anyone know, are vests permitted for dressage classes and/or eventing dressage, or does that draw the line with judges on safety vs. "whatever", assuming you can't fit it under your jacket? I took two greenies to a dressage schooling show this weekend, and ended up just schooling when the show was cancelled. I forgot to pack a vest, and felt quite naked and scared...

        I still don't understand how dressage riders and/or eventing riders in dressage can feel safe in just a hunt cap... On a wound-up, fit eventer in a crowded warm up area, wouldn't one want all safety equipment on? I just. don't. get it. But that's just me proselytizing, so nevermind.
        www.glenbaer.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I've always worn a helmet, but I'm starting to consider wearing a vest as well...

          Yesterday my dressage horse barged through my outside aids and we ended up outside the ring. Slippery grass+moderate downhill slope+barefoot pony=horse and I both going down. Luckily, because of the hill, she landed farther down then I did and I got up ASAP so that I'd be out of the way if she flailed around getting up.

          This is the fourth time I've had a horse flip on me - twice on my mare when she has completely panicked about something and forgotten to pay attention to her own balance (she does not rear often at all), and once when XC schooling and she caught her foot in the corner of a revetted ditch when she decided mid-air that she didn't really want to do it. Every single time, I've been lucky and only been landed on up to the knee, and both of us walked away a bit sore but uninjured. The only time I was wearing a vest was the fall XC.

          Obviously, vests protect against some nasty injuries - but how much crush-type pressure can they really absorb?
          http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ncer/?start=20

          Mares are like neutrons. If there are too many in an area, you approach critical mass. And then there are explosions. Loud ones.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by purplnurpl View Post
            ROFLMAO.

            Sorry. I just saw a mental picture of JER on a fat QH plunking along in an Exo!!

            : )
            Ah, you laugh. I have some lovely photos of myself doing endurance in a vest (this was pre-EXO) on a fat QH paint.

            The paint, who is the most intelligent horse I've ever encountered, is an off-the-charts wild man. Think John Belushi in Animal House. Big, big buck, too. But I found that after 15 miles or so, he was a different horse, so we did endurance.

            I save the EXO for special occasions, not trail riding. I also will sit on some horses bareback with no vest. I acquired the vest habit a long time ago when I had a mare with a hellacious buck. She would never hurt you, the falls weren't heavy, but she could drop her shoulder and twist her hip and you didn't have a chance. I thought the best course of action was to make sure I could always get right back on her. She was a smart mare and eventually got tired of dumping me to no avail.

            (At the time, I had a 24/7 high-pressure job where having to take time off for injury would be like being buried alive. Worse, actually, because I'd have people screaming at me the whole time.)

            I took some horses to a police training clinic once. We were the only English folks there. I wore my vest. The western folks said 'Why are you wearing that?'. I very pleasantly explained that I was a wuss. About ten minutes into the clinic, a QH freaked out at something -- I think it was the remote-controlled car -- dumped the rider and kicked her hard -- CRACK!!! -- in the ribs. No question that she had broken ribs, it was just a matter of how many.

            At the break, the western folk wanted to know where they could get a vest like mine.

            But really, the helmet and vest are nothing. I also fence -- I'm talking swords, not horse-containment -- and if you think helmets and vests are hot or claustrophobic, then get thee to a fencing center and spend an hour hopping about in a big heavy full-face mask, thick glove, hard plastic chest protector, impenetrable-fabric underarm protector and a fencing jacket, which is like a straightjacket but with two sleeves.

            Comment


            • #7
              I hear ya! I ride my rising 4yo in one a lot of the time. She doesn't have a mean bone in her body, but she's BIG, and can get a bit worried and when that happens she stops listening. And then I start worrying about things going wrong and how much broken ribs would hurt. And then I stop riding which doesn't do either of us any good!

              I admit I don't *always* wear it since we're in a dressage saddle most of the time and I find that the back interferes with the cantle a bit, but if there's anything new being introduced, or there's snow coming off the roof etc, it absolutely goes on.
              "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JER View Post
                But really, the helmet and vest are nothing. I also fence -- I'm talking swords, not horse-containment -- and if you think helmets and vests are hot or claustrophobic, then get thee to a fencing center and spend an hour hopping about in a big heavy full-face mask, thick glove, hard plastic chest protector, impenetrable-fabric underarm protector and a fencing jacket, which is like a straightjacket but with two sleeves.
                As a fellow fencer, I haven't decided yet which is worse. I probably prefer the vest, though - at least there are no sleeves to screw with the range of motion in your shoulders.
                http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ncer/?start=20

                Mares are like neutrons. If there are too many in an area, you approach critical mass. And then there are explosions. Loud ones.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  ya, people laugh

                  but the one horse out of all the horses I ride that has gotten me off was the western pleasure horse. The one that jogs so slow and soft that I accidentally took a nap one time on her.

                  And there was not even a discussion. I was enjoying a nice lope and then that lil mare (15h tall 15h wide) ripped the reins right out of my hands and with her nose between her knees coiled up and let it rip. Just once.
                  That's all it took and I was crashing back down on the saddle and then blup off the side.
                  On that dang hard Texas black gumbo.
                  On the way down I was thinking. "Thank you vest. Cusion the fall well pls."
                  Actually it happened so fast I was thinking..."how the heck did I end up on the ground?"


                  lol.

                  And the 13h Welsh Cob that I'm riding. He ran off with me the other day. (I'm 6' tall)
                  Can't help but laugh while trying to regain control of that one. I snickered the entire time through that run-away.

                  I have to say I'm having a ball cross training and riding all of these different shapes and sizes. It's pure joy.
                  http://kaboomeventing.com/
                  http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                  Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    hmmmm

                    I've always worn helmets, no questions asked, since a severe head injury about 9 years ago. I've always cringed at the price of the vests, but I guess when you really think about it, it's nothing considering what could happen.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Caroline Weber View Post
                      As a fellow fencer, I haven't decided yet which is worse. I probably prefer the vest, though - at least there are no sleeves to screw with the range of motion in your shoulders.
                      And I would take helmet-hair over mask-hair any day.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        not too exspensive at all!

                        Some of my clients that have fears have ordered them for about 100 bucks.

                        There is a Tipp in the catalogs for about $125 or so.
                        http://kaboomeventing.com/
                        http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                        Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Cruise eBay as well. I landed a brand-new CO vest for about $100...
                          "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for posting this, Kristen. (I'm Becky from AreaV!). I USED to be great about wearing a helmet all the time...but now that I'm at my own place, I admit to slacking, esp. when it's "just" dressage.

                            But do you really wear a vest for everything? How about the rest of you--how many folks wear a vest EVERY time they ride??

                            Something to think about, for sure!

                            --Becky
                            --Becky in TX
                            Clinic Blogs and Rolex Blogs
                            She who throws dirt is losing ground.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kairoshorses View Post
                              But do you really wear a vest for everything? How about the rest of you--how many folks wear a vest EVERY time they ride??
                              I may not count because I already posted, but yup, every ride. Until this past summer, I typically wore a vest for cross-country (of course), some stadium jumping, and with starting/working the babies and greenies. In September, I was launched and crashed hard (i.e., actually cracked the shell of the helmet) off a typically placid, happy-go-lucky 17.3h warmblood. The vest kept me from completely destroying my shoulder, collarbone, and scapula, and instead I only had an AC separation that took 2 months of recovery, sans riding. That time period cost me a lot, and I can't fathom if the accident had been worse.

                              Since then, just knowing how quickly everything happened, I don't take any chances. To me, it's not worth the risk to ride without it, and it only takes 5 seconds to get, put on, and zip up. One never knows when something might go wrong (they're called "accidents" for a reason; if we knew it was coming, we'd prepare or change plans ). Ok, proselytizing finished for the day.
                              www.glenbaer.com

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I'm thinking about it now too. I had one lately where a vest may have saved me some bruises (but how often does your horse get hit by a car right underneath you?).
                                I ride in the indoor alot now and the footing is soft but the walls are hard. Anyway I was thinking about it but up here in area 2 it takes me 20 minutes to get dressed everyday. I wondering if my vest will fit over my: thermal undershirt, turtleneck, longsleeve T, fleece or sweater and then my jacket. I definitely put it on the first few times I rode the filly.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Flying Hippotamus View Post
                                  (but how often does your horse get hit by a car right underneath you?).
                                  WOW

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    I do

                                    I wear a vest every time. I also like the back support.
                                    Just last week one of the steadiest trail horses I ride spooked at the Christmas decorations in his front yard and was spinning under a tree next to a fence. I thought I was commin off for sure.
                                    It's not the fall but WHAT you fall on!!

                                    The only exception is flat work with my Booms. But he's my youngin and I've been his human in the saddle for a good 4.5 years now. I wore a vest for at least the first 6 months or so on the flat after starting him.

                                    Since he's been off I've started several more three year olds and become even more addicted to the vest.


                                    And for myself on XC whatever I end up with next (I'm toying with Exo or Rodney) will have shoulder pads.
                                    Why not save your shoulder/collar bone by 80%? Seems a no brainer to me.


                                    I also highly recommend all parents to put their little one's in a vest. Why not?
                                    You're gonna fall off over and over again. Just like you fell down over and over again when learning to walk.
                                    ; )
                                    http://kaboomeventing.com/
                                    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                                    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      to the question asked by Glenbaer - yes you can show in a vest as it is in the catagory of safety equipment. There was actually a huge discussion over on the H/J boards about it too. I was amazed at the amount that felt vests were inapporiate in the H/J ring!! Or that they were only for beginners. I would actually applaud anyone who wore one for competitions besides cross country.
                                      I wore mine in dressage tests over the spring when my horse was being very naughty. I always wear it in stadium and obviously cross country.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Speaking of safety...did you know that an ASTM helmet is NOT required of a junior rider in the dressage phase of a horse trial or three day event? Nor is it required of juniors at USDF dressage shows. Yes indeedy.
                                        Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
                                        Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X