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Rider Fitness, And "Stickability"

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  • #61
    Originally posted by JER View Post
    I've never heard of Spalding's Donuts, but now I plan to run the race with one in each hand. That would be perfect.
    AKA Hoosier Handcuffs.

    Comment


    • #62
      People Chase XC Race at Chatt Hills in May
      Info and sign up link on page below.
      http://chcinternational.net/participate/people-chase/

      Comment


      • #63
        I am considered quite thin (by others anyway). Although I work out hard 3 -4 times per week and am quite fit, I have virtually zero core strength and struggle to hold a solid 2 point for the length of a Novice XC course without grabbing mane for balance.

        I can stick to (almost) anything my young highly athletic horse throws. As a four year old she was so lightening quick with a spook or spin, no one else would get on her, but some how my butt never moved more than an inch out of the saddle even though my upper body was tossed around violently.

        I believe it is not so much being thin, it is sheer instinct carefully developed by getting dumped 100 times as a kid riding smart ponies and eventually learning to stick.
        Ironically I probably weigh quite a bit less now 20 plus yrs later than I did when I was 15 when I started starving myself. now I live quite a healthy lifestyle.

        Being such a talented rider like BH probably gives her an advantage over the rest of us, weight aside, but some things even the best can't stick.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by JER View Post
          kerilli, that's true. But that's also what my post said -- my sister was commenting only on the riders that she saw out walking the course while we were running.

          Ah, okay, sorry, I didn't read it properly.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by paulaedwina View Post
            I don't think anybody is using them as an excuse not to get fitter. I think we all understand and agree that fitness makes your riding better. I think the discussion arises when people might conflate fitness with being skinny.

            Paula
            Yes. This.

            Comment


            • #66
              Howcum you guys get to talk about this all day, but George Morris says the exact same thing and the entire Politically Correct world crucifies him as "insensitive?"

              Comment


              • #67
                Nobody is politically correct here.
                Click here before you buy.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by deltawave View Post
                  Nobody is politically correct here.
                  + 1. Besides, as it relates to "stickability" aka "survivability" on a tough XC course, it's a legitimate discussion for Eventers to have.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    My biggest thing, as it relates to eventing specifically (and has been touched on lightly here) is that we require A LOT out of our horses, especially as we climb the levels. By the rider being fit and strong we make THEIR job easier. Which is why I can be a little catty and bitchy when I see heavy, out of shape riders (riders who LOOK tired, sit on their horses, can't hold their position, etc). It isn't because I think everyone should be supermodel thin...it is because I think it is ONLY FAIR to the horse to be as fit for the job as they are. This comes down less to stickability (which is a lot of instinct and muscle memory....some of the stuff I have ridden out without batting an eye has little to with strength and a whole lot to do with being the crash test dummy for years) and far more to giving our horses the best advantage possible. The fitter we are (again, not necessarily skinny, but strong and fit to do the job), the easier it is for them.

                    This is why back in the day when men were men, the Jimmys and the Toddys and the JMPs of the world STARVED themselves, ran and ran and ran, and generally made a big effing deal about staying light. This is why Boyd and Will and others ran and worked out and took up yoga last summer leading up to the Olympics...they wanted their horses to go fast and jump big and feel great on the 3rd day...so they made themselves as light and fit as possible.

                    Now, before I get jumped on, this doesn't mean I think the average novice level amateur needs to pile on MORE stuff in their busy lives, but I do think they should be mindful of what they eat (less fake things...the less ingredients, the better), walk their dogs more, do more two point, do some planks, etc. I think it is part of being a good horseman. Especially for eventing.

                    OK. I feel better now.

                    (Full disclosure: I was eating Reese's cups this AM....so, I'm hardly above reproach! I said what I said for myself as much as anyone!)
                    Amanda

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                    • #70
                      As someone who has struggled with weight my entire life, interestingly enough I was just diagnosed with a slew of food allergies. The things I was doing "right" for sooo long, weren't right at all for me. I had gone off dairy and switched to almond milk a couple of years ago, ate nuts for snacks, ate more soy than meat.
                      Problem is, I'm allergic to nuts and soy, and not to dairy and meat. I'm allergic to lettuce for pete's sake and have lived the Salad Life forEVER.

                      This is still pretty new to me, it's a struggle because it's all so different from my previous (well thought out) food choices. I'm allergic to every grain except corn. And tomatoes, which I grow myself every year. It's crazy, the list is so long.

                      BUT... in a couple of weeks of eating my 'safe' foods I have lost about 6 pounds and do feel different. I know it isn't all fat I have lost, I definitely look less bloated. And now that I am getting cleaner, I can easily tell what foods do not agree with me (that I was not tested for).

                      I'm just over 50 and probably have been dealing with this for a long time, judging by how I've felt. Right now my weight is about 165, I'm 5'9", so not horrible but I'd like to be 10 less for my frame and muscle mass.

                      Just an FYI as I would have never in a million years pictured this. BTW I got tested in the first place because I also recently found out I'm very allergic to everything that grows in Kentucky (been here seven years now) and didn't know that either.
                      We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
                      www.dleestudio.com

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                        Now, before I get jumped on, this doesn't mean I think the average novice level amateur needs to pile on MORE stuff in their busy lives, but I do think they should be mindful of what they eat (less fake things...the less ingredients, the better), walk their dogs more, do more two point, do some planks, etc. I think it is part of being a good horseman. Especially for eventing.

                        OK. I feel better now.

                        (Full disclosure: I was eating Reese's cups this AM....so, I'm hardly above reproach! I said what I said for myself as much as anyone!)
                        I'm pretty sure I agree with you, so I'm restating it in my view.

                        To me, it comes down to the question "How much do you want it?" You owe it to your horse to be fit enough to stay out of the way the level x-country you're riding, but beyond that if your fitness level holds you back, that's your choice. Working full time, perhaps raising a family, and riding all at the same time is hard. And you choose what your priorities are within the framework of your life. As a single and childless woman who only works 40 hours/week, it's far easier for me to get the 10-15 hours of saddle time I'll be aiming for by end of summer than someone who works more hours and has a family to raise. It's also easier for me to fit in off-saddle exercise without hungry kids wondering where there dinner is. Fitness (and only weight as it relates to fitness) obviously affects your riding - the key is, I don't judge someone for being less fit, because I don't live their life and know all the extraneous things affecting them. I DO have to resist getting snotty if someone complains about not improving but knowingly chooses not to get themselves more fit, but that's a different story.
                        Originally posted by Silverbridge
                        If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          I have ridden for about 40 years and have had my weight fluctuate by a range of 96 lbs since I reached my current adult height (low of 145 to high of 241). I know for an absolute fact that carrying extra weight affects my riding, regardless of fitness level. When I have more fat padding in my seat and legs I absolutely cannot get my leg around the horse as well and am absolutely not as secure in the saddle.

                          There have been times that I'm on the heavier side, around 200lbs or so but doing pilates weekly and more muscularly fit than times that I've been around 180 and more sedentary, but I still feel more secure in the saddle with less fat on my legs and seat.
                          The weight crept on slowly (and came off even slower) and on a day-by-day basis it was difficult to tell just when I reached the "tipping point" but it absolutely affected my riding and safety.

                          If you are not sure that your student understand how her weight is affecting her riding then tell her, without judgement or emotion, simply as a statement of fact.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
                            Howcum you guys get to talk about this all day, but George Morris says the exact same thing and the entire Politically Correct world crucifies him as "insensitive?"
                            George Morris has been known to classify people at a healthy body weight as "fat" and only consider stick-thin, borderline anorexic people as "fit".

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Yes, Katyusha, correct. Mary King retired. Thank you.
                              http://www.camstock.net/

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                                This is why back in the day when men were men, the Jimmys and the Toddys and the JMPs of the world STARVED themselves, ran and ran and ran, and generally made a big effing deal about staying light.
                                Just because I'm so old and decrepid that I remember those days I need to clarify. The Jimmys, Toddys, JMPs starved themselves because everyone was required to carry 165 pounds. If you weighed less you carried lead. If you weighed more than that you were at a disadvantage. In a long format 4 stars it was a big deal so these guys stayed as light as they could.

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  Originally posted by DLee View Post
                                  As someone who has struggled with weight my entire life, interestingly enough I was just diagnosed with a slew of food allergies. The things I was doing "right" for sooo long, weren't right at all for me. I had gone off dairy and switched to almond milk a couple of years ago, ate nuts for snacks, ate more soy than meat.
                                  Problem is, I'm allergic to nuts and soy, and not to dairy and meat. I'm allergic to lettuce for pete's sake and have lived the Salad Life forEVER.

                                  This is still pretty new to me, it's a struggle because it's all so different from my previous (well thought out) food choices. I'm allergic to every grain except corn. And tomatoes, which I grow myself every year. It's crazy, the list is so long.

                                  BUT... in a couple of weeks of eating my 'safe' foods I have lost about 6 pounds and do feel different. I know it isn't all fat I have lost, I definitely look less bloated. And now that I am getting cleaner, I can easily tell what foods do not agree with me (that I was not tested for).

                                  I'm just over 50 and probably have been dealing with this for a long time, judging by how I've felt. Right now my weight is about 165, I'm 5'9", so not horrible but I'd like to be 10 less for my frame and muscle mass.

                                  Just an FYI as I would have never in a million years pictured this. BTW I got tested in the first place because I also recently found out I'm very allergic to everything that grows in Kentucky (been here seven years now) and didn't know that either.
                                  I've been low-carbing for over 5 years now, and the more I read of people's success stories, the more convinced I become that the Paleo/Primal idea passes the Occam's Razor test 100% of the time. I know there are exceptions that prove that rule but . . . most of 'em cheat!

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Originally posted by subk View Post
                                    Just because I'm so old and decrepid that I remember those days I need to clarify. The Jimmys, Toddys, JMPs starved themselves because everyone was required to carry 165 pounds. If you weighed less you carried lead. If you weighed more than that you were at a disadvantage. In a long format 4 stars it was a big deal so these guys stayed as light as they could.
                                    I was going to go into that, but didn't for the sake of (some amount of) brevity.

                                    But, that doesn't mean that the Boydos and Wills of the world didn't slim down and shape up last year. Being lighter and fitter still means something.
                                    Amanda

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #78
                                      Originally posted by hb View Post
                                      I have ridden for about 40 years and have had my weight fluctuate by a range of 96 lbs since I reached my current adult height (low of 145 to high of 241). I know for an absolute fact that carrying extra weight affects my riding, regardless of fitness level. When I have more fat padding in my seat and legs I absolutely cannot get my leg around the horse as well and am absolutely not as secure in the saddle.

                                      There have been times that I'm on the heavier side, around 200lbs or so but doing pilates weekly and more muscularly fit than times that I've been around 180 and more sedentary, but I still feel more secure in the saddle with less fat on my legs and seat.
                                      The weight crept on slowly (and came off even slower) and on a day-by-day basis it was difficult to tell just when I reached the "tipping point" but it absolutely affected my riding and safety.

                                      If you are not sure that your student understand how her weight is affecting her riding then tell her, without judgement or emotion, simply as a statement of fact.
                                      Totally can agree. I too felt a huge difference in my ability to use my leg correctly and to sit well when I lost weight, I never thought it was a big deal.
                                      Yes, I agree about Student, She actually is now heavier that she was last fall.

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        ^ I think since you have such a great personal story, sharing that will be more powerful than pointing out any other (Rolex famous or not) allegedly unfit riders. It also puts you both in it together, rather than pointing fingers.

                                        But since she's turned down your exercise-together suggestions before, it may be that she isn't willing/able to make that change. I guess we all draw a line somewhere in our commitment to the sport.

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by hb View Post
                                          George Morris has been known to classify people at a healthy body weight as "fat" and only consider stick-thin, borderline anorexic people as "fit".
                                          This! We aren't talking about aesthetics in this thread, we are talking about what combination of fitness and weight are necessary / sufficient to successfully ride this sport, at different levels. Not whether riders conform to some punitive and absurd 'look' in their breeches.
                                          I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
                                          I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

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