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Opinions on indoors

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  • Opinions on indoors

    Can you guys give me opinions on designs for indoors? Does anyone have an indoor with attached shed row stalls? Do they get terrible hot? Any other design suggestions? What do you like about yours? What do you dislike?

  • #2
    Originally posted by hhfarm View Post
    Can you guys give me opinions on designs for indoors? Does anyone have an indoor with attached shed row stalls? Do they get terrible hot? Any other design suggestions? What do you like about yours? What do you dislike?

    I'm in the middle of building one. It's turning out beautiful (and I'm going broke ). Before I settled on my design...I looked at a lot. I decided against a shed row attached for a number of reasons...but mostly, I wanted my indoor as open as possible.

    Mine is an L shape with an observation room and office attached at the short end of the indoor, and appartment above. The riding area of the ring is about 80' by 200'. The barn is an H shape attaching at the end. One aisle opens into the indoor....which I don't anticipate we will use much. The other opens to the end of the ring with a small launching area. Turn left goes into the ring, right goes out and straight across gets to the steps up into the observation room.

    I have full windows (normal windows) down the entire length of the barn on both sides. And windows up high at the end. There is a shed at the other short end attached where I will store the jumps, drag etc. When the windows are all open, it is like opening the side of the ring. But even when closed, you are not in a box. I hate being in a box so my indoor needed to be as open and airy as possible but given our winters...still enclosed.

    The biggest design element that I LOVE are the trusses we used. They are metal and used for airplane hangers. They were more expensive but you use a lot fewer of them. It gives the indoor a very open feeling.

    I'll attached pictures from facebook when I have a chance....for now...I've got to get back to work
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Apr. 22, 2013, 07:30 PM.
    ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

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    • #3
      My favorite indoor is a wood 50x70 meter structure. It has 6 stalls on one of the short sides of the barn where the school ponies stay.

      It never gets nastily hot thanks to being well vented. It has big half-height doors on all four sides so thereis always a nice cross breeze. I think good ventilation is key to keeping the temperature inside from getting swelteringly hot in summer. I'd rather bundle up to ride in winter than feel like I'm going to get heat stroke in summer. I guess it depends if you also have an outdoor ring to use in summer though.

      They have sprinklers built into the roof to wet the footing (sand) so it doesn't get dusty, which also helps keep it cool.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hhfarm View Post
        Does anyone have an indoor with attached shed row stalls? Do they get terrible hot?
        I have worked in/kept horses in that sort of set-up, however the building was a coverall style and trapped heat in summer and was cold in the winter. It also got dusty. Not very good ventilation.

        Best features I've seen are:

        -windows that open in summer
        -windows above eye level (especially for those with young/green horses)
        -skylights in arena
        -LED indoor lighting (energy efficient and no "warming up")
        -insulated indoor (REALLY makes a huge difference in winter)
        -shock-absorbing footing
        -speaker system so people in the viewing lounge can actually hear instructors and coaches during lessons/clinics (or riders can play music)
        -pole/jump standard storage either on the walls or in corners to protect them from horses chewing on them during arena turnout
        -as many mirrors as possible
        -automated garage/"big" doors so no heavy lifting
        A quick tutorial on interval training: Conditioning your horse for eventing

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        • #5
          This is my heart indoor (sadly, I am no longer at this farm, but I was part of its conception and watched it get built).

          Really, it is a simple building. The things that make it fantastic are the windows (they make the ring feel like a covered ring 3 months out of the year, yet you can seal it up tight and keep the wind off in the winter), the lighting (no mercury lights. And they are BRIGHT), the mirrors, and the sprinklers. We also installed a sound system (we could plug our ipods in, but also used it for clinics). Very, very fancy footing, but that was just a perk. Decent footing of any kind would still have been great. It is a fantastic ring. The ONLY change I would have made would have been a comfortable viewing lounge.

          The indoor I have now is practical and workable, but is everything bad about indoors. Big, ugly, hulking steel building with big, heavy roll up doors, and gross mercury lights, and noisy. The ceiling is insulated, at least (A MUST), but the steel skin is noisy in the wind and those doors rattle horribly in the wind.

          I, personally, don't like indoors directly attached to the ring (though, what bfne describes isn't bad). I find that when the barn shares a long side with the indoor, the barn can colder and I often find the barn is dustier than just average barn dust. I prefer them to have a little space. Perfect world would be a breezeway between the two buildings.
          Amanda

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          • #6
            Originally posted by WW_Queen View Post

            -windows above eye level (especially for those with young/green horses)

            Ah..see I'm the opposite. I want the outside distractions with my young horses. So I want the windows low enough that they can see out. I'd rather deal with the young sillies and get them used to it than over protect them. Of course it can make for some interesting rides!

            I do have the new lights and it is so cool to flick the switch and they are ON rather than waiting 10 minutes for them to warm up!

            The truly biggest expense is the footing. I'm putting in Martin Collins footing (MC Ecotrack)--so dust free and no watering. I figure, if you are going to go through with the expense of an indoor....don't cheap out on the footing.
            ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

            Comment


            • #7
              My only comment on indoors is...make it 20' longer on both sides than you think is big enough. I don't think anyone's ever said "gee I wish this indoor were smaller."

              I hate tiny indoors especially if you're building it for winter riding, when it gets crowded fast.
              Originally posted by PeanutButterPony
              you can shackle your pony to a lawn chair at the show...so long as its in a conservative color.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lilypad View Post
                My favorite indoor is a wood 50x70 meter structure. .

                Wow...that is huge. Around here it was exponetially more costly to to go much wider than 25 meters (80').
                ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
                  Ah..see I'm the opposite. I want the outside distractions with my young horses. So I want the windows low enough that they can see out. I'd rather deal with the young sillies and get them used to it than over protect them. Of course it can make for some interesting rides!

                  I do have the new lights and it is so cool to flick the switch and they are ON rather than waiting 10 minutes for them to warm up!

                  The truly biggest expense is the footing. I'm putting in Martin Collins footing (MC Ecotrack)--so dust free and no watering. I figure, if you are going to go through with the expense of an indoor....don't cheap out on the footing.
                  Yep. I agree regarding the windows. They have to deal with distractions OUTSIDE, why shouldn't they deal with them inside, too? I am not a fan of sheltering poor poopsy because he might spook or get distracted.
                  Amanda

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                  • #10
                    I would rather have an indoor well separated from stalls by a breezeway or covered area (storage?) than have the stalls right on top of the arena. It can get awfully dusty and drafty in an indoor. Not that I think "drafts" are the devil--one can also name it "good ventilation", LOL, but COLD is more our concern up here than HOT.

                    I love the ones with the option of roll-up sides or at least lots of panels that can open up, either the garage door style or actual rolling canvas. And lots of those clear plastic (not opaque, CLEAR) panels up high and along the ridgeline for natural light.

                    Ours has large sliding doors at each end and also along each long side that open 12 feet wide x 15 feet high and are closed in warm weather with an airy gate rather than a section of wall. Good cross breezes.
                    Click here before you buy.

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                    • #11
                      I do not like riding in indoor arenas at all and am lucky enough to live where I don't have to. BUT, I will say, ones that I have liked most of all have been covered with open sides (not enclosed) so there is shade but unrestricted airflow. I lived in N KY for ten years and never had any extended periods where I needed an enclosed building, but that is in large part personal preference.

                      After trying to think of any enclosed arenas I have enjoyed riding in, I can't think of any that didn't have at least partially open sides. In north/central VA, I very much liked our school arena, which had walls about 4' high, then was open to roof. One long side was enclosed as a viewing area and one short side could be enclosed by rolling down panels if there were stiff winds. The other two remained open at all times.
                      Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                      Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                      We Are Flying Solo

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                      • #12
                        hhfarms - are you thinking about stalls that directly open into the indoor or separated by a short wall?
                        1. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.

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                        • #13
                          I prefer aisles that tee into the barn, myself.

                          I love the set up that Chris Duke has--I can give you her email addy if you don't have it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
                            I want the outside distractions with my young horses.
                            When my big guy lost his vision, I learned a lot thanks to an equine opthamologist in the area. The problem with windows at eye level is that they're typically not clear glass, they're frosted. Combine that with a horse's already limited vision and it's more like dark blobs the see, not a relatable image like say, working in a crowded warm-up ring.

                            Not to mention it is totally fine for many riders/horses if it's just you at your private facility, but if you have lots of clients/horses in training who are nervous, it can become a liability when the blobs outside start tearing around their paddocks. I currently ride at a barn with a brand new, football field indoor and windows at eye level. Doesn't bother me or the greenies I ride, but for the timid AA's or that one person who keeps getting dumped every 2 weeks when the blobs are bucking/playing, it sucks big time.
                            A quick tutorial on interval training: Conditioning your horse for eventing

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Having boarded at a barn where stalls open directly into the indoor I wouldn't recommend it, even if separated with a short wall. Stall cleaning becomes an issue, along with dust control and disruptive horses. Currently I'm at a barn with a short corridor between the barn and the indoor and I think it really makes a difference. The indoor is a Clearspan building and very nice to ride in. Also plan for a storage area for your jumps and arena drag if you want to keep them handy.
                              1. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by WW_Queen View Post
                                When my big guy lost his vision, I learned a lot thanks to an equine opthamologist in the area. The problem with windows at eye level is that they're typically not clear glass, they're frosted. .
                                Mine are clear. Sure it will set horses off if something is tearing outside. But the same will happen if you are riding outside. If a horse is dumping a rider every two weeks....that rider either needs a different horse or that horse needs additional ground work...or both.

                                I totally understand your point but I was building the indoor for me and my own use (although I have two pros with horses at the farm). And for me, since I'm stuck in the indoor for part at least part of the year, I preferred windows eye level. And yes, I've been bucked off a greenie because of the hunt coming through the farm (with a similar indoor) was just a bit too exciting....but from a training perspective, I prefer to deal with the distractions and feel much less like I'm riding in a box.


                                For me, the end of my barn does open to the indoor but there are doors that can be shut and with dust free footing, I'm not too concerned. But I also don't like the rings with the stalls opening right into the ring. Also, when you have the stalls walls sharing a wall with the indoor....kicking of the horses in the barn did get me bucked off a few times.

                                Also be very aware of permit issues. Because of the apartment with my indoor....I had to have massive firewall (you wouldn't notice it but I certainly paid for it) between the barn and ring. Doing it again...I wouldn't do an apartment.
                                Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Apr. 23, 2013, 08:37 AM.
                                ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Horsecents: I would have a full wall between the arena and barn, then an aisle, then stalls.

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                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by hhfarm View Post
                                    Horsecents: I would have a full wall between the arena and barn, then an aisle, then stalls.

                                    I boarded at a farm like that. It was ok. I didn't love it though but it is an efficient way to build especially if you are doing 10 stalls or less.
                                    ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by hhfarm View Post
                                      Horsecents: I would have a full wall between the arena and barn, then an aisle, then stalls.
                                      My west indoor is built like that, stalls on both sides of the indoor, but full walls to seperate. I prefer a separate barn aisle for ease of use with the wash stall, grain room, tack room, and separation of noise, etc.

                                      It will depend on your land, footprint availability, budget, prevailing wind direction (for ventilation) etc on what is the best for you.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I boarded at a barn with an indoor and stalls on either side. The walls of the indoor were the back walls of the stalls with the aisle way on the outside. It's an 80 x 200 indoor with approximately 40 stalls. I remember all the walking I had to do plus all the noise coming into the indoor from the barn areas. I always thought if the stalls had been placed across from each other it really would have made operating the barn much more efficient.
                                        1. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.

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