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Black Stallion style rear on a horse I'm shopping right now. Thoughts?

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Fillabeana View Post
    If he was being longed when he reared...he should have been engaged with the handler. Not a good sign in my book.

    But...he's headed your way. Be careful!
    If he's never been lunged in his life, he probably wouldn't understand that lunge line = work = staying engaged. Especially not if he's been under forced, self-entertained, contained exercise of 2.5 miles at a trot in a euro-ciser! He's probably used to dinking around while working and probably doesn't get actual free time/turnout to play.

    I agree with the be careful sentiment, but would also add, don't set him up to fail by trying to induce a rear. Good luck, hopefully he's as nice as he looks and vets with flying colors!

    Comment


    • #22
      well, this is probably useless information but I caught my young horse actually playing the black stallion one day. he had ripped the tail flap of another horse's blanket. He'd pick it up, shake it, rear up, throw it, then stomp on it. Pick it up and do it all over again, several times in a row (with fancy trot or gallop between episodes).

      thank god he has never shown this tendency w/ me or under saddle!

      he was light on his front feet as a baby though. He'd often rear up and lay his front legs over the back of his mom. He was a wee bit precocious as a kid.

      GOOD LUCK!

      Comment


      • #23
        Hey, congrats!! Let us know how the trial goes. Personally, I'd much rather have a rearer than a bucker so that alone wouldn't bother me.

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by blame_the_champagne View Post

          Soooo...I asked her if she'd let me do a trial so I could get him under saddle and PPE him at home and she said YES. He popped on a passing trailer today and will arrive tonight! Woot woot!
          Hurrah!!!
          given the situation that rear would not bother me at all

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          • #25
            Like I said, I don't mind if they do it in play (my horse really doesn't buck and or rear under saddle. But he certainly does a lot of both when being a hooligan in the pasture! He also fly bucks occasionally when he is really, really, REALLY wound on the way to or from the pasture....life with Toby ). One my all time favorite horses would often stand straight up, waving his feet around like he was hailing a cab, while hand walking post surgery (why I hand walked him with a chain, a lunge line, gloves and a helmet!), but don't think he EVER even got light on the front end under tack. I wouldn't want to deal with a horse that reared under tack for any reason....rearing is resistance to go forward, plain and simple, and if they don't "play" by going forward, what are they going to do when they really just don't want to go forward?

            OP, in the scenario described, I would be less leery. I haven't read your other thread, so I don't know all the details other do. Just realize that this guy's reaction to confusion, fear, or just plain pissiness is to go up....it may or may not manifest under tack.
            Amanda

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            • #26
              My horse Cool reared constantly and like a candlestick when turned out. I don't think he did it much, if at all when being lunged. He went up a few times when being hand walked. He reared with me exactly twice under saddle. Once was a minor prop when another horse cantered off in front of him on the trail. The other time I was walking on a loose rein, talking to my trainer, when he went straight up. He came down, shook his head, and never did it again. He would go boing boing boing with his head when in an excited or stressful situation which I think was a substitute for doing something more naughty. I think I could have taught him to rear quite easily. The sucker had a huge buck, which he did do under saddle.
              The Evil Chem Prof

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              • #27
                If I saw a horse I was prospecting rear straight up several times on a lunge line even in play that would be it for me, I wouldn't even take him for free. But that is just me, and I'm a big chicken.

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                • #28
                  I have four horses a TB, an Andy, an Arabian, and a Half-Arabian. They all rear when they play if they've been in for awhile. My Half-Arab bucks 10 times and then seals it with a huge straight up rear to show off...such a hussy. She's perfect when in hand or being longed.

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                  • #29
                    I hate to be a wet blanket on the Black Stallion merit discussion, but I am far more concerned that you're shopping for what might be an inappropriate selection. I read your post about your trainers and what they want, and what you want -- which is somewhat unclear.

                    Do you want a packer?

                    Do you want a prospect?

                    What is your realistic riding level?

                    Why do you have two trainers looking for different types of horses?

                    Andrew Nicholson says no one should take more than three days to find a horse (or something equally short, not sure exactly.) I am sort of this variety as is JLee and a few others. It sounds to me like the dispair you are feeling is not the fault of the horses or people you're dealing with. Can you define what you want?
                    Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
                    Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Valid point, retread. He may be a totally fantastic horse, but is he fantastic in terms of what the OP needs (or wants?)? I'm sure one, or hopefully both, trainers will be able to participate in the decision process about this particular horse once he arrives and the trial begins.

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                      • #31
                        https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...58732229_n.jpg

                        doesn't bother me!
                        Big Idea Eventing

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #32
                          Originally posted by retreadeventer View Post
                          I hate to be a wet blanket on the Black Stallion merit discussion, but I am far more concerned that you're shopping for what might be an inappropriate selection. I read your post about your trainers and what they want, and what you want -- which is somewhat unclear.

                          Do you want a packer?

                          Do you want a prospect?

                          What is your realistic riding level?

                          Why do you have two trainers looking for different types of horses?

                          Andrew Nicholson says no one should take more than three days to find a horse (or something equally short, not sure exactly.) I am sort of this variety as is JLee and a few others. It sounds to me like the dispair you are feeling is not the fault of the horses or people you're dealing with. Can you define what you want?
                          I am a strong intermediate rider. I am confident handling most horses and off the ground. My flat work is stronger, as I have only been jumping for 3 years. I began eventing on a green broke horse and re-trained my last guy (with help from my eventing trainer) from cow work to schooling Novice/Training in two years. I am looking for a green broke project. Quality conformation and soundness are my main criteria. Obviously looking for smart and sane : ) I wanted my horse closer to home so sadly had to leave my event trainer (1 hr drive each way), so am now working with a dressage and h/j trainer and clinicing locally for x-country. They are collaborating with me on my selections, but at the end of the day this is my decision. They offer critique, opinions, etc. but neither are close enough to me as a rider yet to pick something on my behalf (like my last trainer basically did). Everyone has different preferences in terms of conformation, attitude, and type of ride, which is why I said my jump trainer and I don't always agree. She likes long, big, quiet, slow hunter types more, while I prefer more forward, smaller, close-coupled, sportier types. We all can agree on nice horse flesh, but we enjoy different styles of horse for personal daily use : )

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Since we're on the eventing forum, let's be clear. Are you a strong Intermediate level rider (As in someone who is competent at the Intermediate level of competition) or are you an "intermediate" level rider...someone who is competent say to 3' or so? Because there is a vast difference, and because there is an actual level of our sport (a rather high one) called Intermediate, I feel we need to use terminology that does not confuse or inadvertently mislead.

                            (This is a pet peeve of mine, for the record).\
                            Amanda

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                            • #34
                              I would not worry, just make sure that when you do get on him he knows he's in work.

                              Sometimes with a horse you don't know it's helpful to develop a working relationship with him before actually riding him. I usually do this by training them to long line and then take the time it takes to get communications established through the reins and your voice. This might sound nuts, but try to sort of think with him. Once you feel consistent positive communications it's time to ride.

                              It takes a little more time but you can learn a lot about the horse this way before you ever ride him and he can learn about you

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #35
                                Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                                Since we're on the eventing forum, let's be clear. Are you a strong Intermediate level rider (As in someone who is competent at the Intermediate level of competition) or are you an "intermediate" level rider...someone who is competent say to 3' or so? Because there is a vast difference, and because there is an actual level of our sport (a rather high one) called Intermediate, I feel we need to use terminology that does not confuse or inadvertently mislead.

                                (This is a pet peeve of mine, for the record).\
                                Lol, good clarification. I meant intermediate as is neither beginning nor advanced/professional rider.

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                                • Original Poster

                                  #36
                                  Originally posted by retreadeventer View Post

                                  Do you want a packer?

                                  Definitely wouldn't be checking out OTTBs if I was looking for a packer!

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                                  • #37
                                    I would pass simply for the fact that you cannot adequately evaluate this horse. Unless they are willing to do a trial. That would be the only way I would consider it.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Good luck with the trial! Hope it works out for you!!!

                                      My opinion on the rearing is "meh". Too many variables to read anything useful from it. Lots of otherwise perfectly reasonable horses are going to be full o' beans with that lifestyle. And, my oldie routinely channels the BS when being led in from turn out (he has mellowed quite a bit - used to walk out on his hind legs on occasion) and in the 19 years that I've owned him, has never reared u/s.
                                      Unrepentant carb eater

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                                      • #39
                                        Rearing on the longe wouldn't bother me at all. I'd be more concerned that you could be buying a horse that the trainers you ride with don't think is suitable, so it's a great thing that you can have a trial with this horse.

                                        I consider myself an experienced rider, having bred, broke, and trained a horse myself (a conformational nightmare who I successfully competed at Training), but I cannot imagine buying a horse without my trainer's input. There's a good reason she's a professional and I am not.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          I'm not sure there is much correlation between rearing at play = rearing under saddle. And it sounds like this never-been-lunged horse thought he was at play.

                                          My former upper-level mare liked to show off in turnout by rearing and twirling like a ballerina; but she never tried to rear under saddle. Young silly TB geldings play WiLd StaLLiOnS all the time in turnout, play-biting, hi-ho-silver pawing, and just generally being boys.

                                          Speaking of being boys, probably 90% of weanling/yearling colts will attempt to rear at least once while being led; some of them learn rather quickly That IS NOT ALLOWED, for others it takes longer (and a stud chain or a chiffney). Some of them learn the trick so well they get crafty with it; striking at you if you get a tiny bit ahead, or coming down with a leg over the shank forcing you to let go (and then he gets to run wild & free). Been to the Keeneland September sales? You'll see it if you've handled enough colts; not all farms raise them with good manners. But, it's safe to say, most of these boys grow out of that habit (and/or get the snot knocked out of them) and are well-behaved citizens when they grow up (or lose their manparts).
                                          “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
                                          ? Albert Einstein

                                          ~AJ~

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