• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Can ANY horse have that gorgeous, toe flipping extended trot?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Those neck stretcher things are NOT good for horses that already curl the neck. Just a warning.

    The low-deep-round is great for SOME horses, but not ALL.
    Horses that curl behind the bit do not use the bit properly. So that is the issue that should be addressed--just as you have explained.
    Riding the horse in the deep frame is too advanced for a curling horse. The curling first has to be addressed.

    Actually I have found that horses who curl up into a little ball I do have to ride to fix and therefore I don't usually lunge them. I like to have control of the "bump".
    I have worked curling horses through the issue with the help of the lunge. But I personally find it easier to ride--because basically you have to un teach them and then re teach them and I can do that easier in the saddle. But that's my personal issue.

    The low/deep/round position is correct for every body type and is a very necessary step of top line body building for youngsters. It puts the right kind of beef on them, especially on the lower back and flank. Which is often over looked. Especially in those horses who have a great amount of natural talent.
    Some horses, as mentioned, curl. This causes a issue not only with the ability to ride deep but also with the training scale.
    Teaching a horse who enjoys curling to NOT curl is super fun. NOT. And it takes a very long time. But it absolutely must be addressed before moving on to more advanced schoolings. And if it is skipped, at some point along the way someone will have to address the issue.

    "Why" one might ask, "should the curling be delt with even though the horse is scoring so well in the dressage due to it's very fake perma frame?"
    Well, because one issue with curling is that horse is not stretching it's topline and reaching into the bit. It's not using it's back properly and though a rider can get through (possibly even 2nd level) with this type of frame, it will eventually catch up in a negative way. Maybe the horse will start to stop at large fences. Maybe the horse will go lame in the back.
    Plus, I don't know about you guys, but galloping down to a very large box is super fun on a horse who is curled. Ever wonder if you are going to die? Try it. Super fun. For real.

    So, if the horse does indeed hold the bit properly, the correct progression is to stretch them out and work them properly in the long/deep frame to eventually curl less and less until the horse always searches for the contact instead of hiding from it.

    Remember, this all takes a very precise and technical ride with a very well educated hand. FEEL.

    If the horse doesn't hold the bit then the rider gets to spend countless weeks or [usually] monthS teaching them how to hold the bit, and THEN teaching them to stretch the neck in order to work properly over the top line and to follow the training scale.
    Until the body can be stretched, and the horse can be placed in ANY position by the rider, the horse is stuck at training level or the beginnings of 1st level.


    And I just happen to have some experience with photo documentation. : )

    1. Curling horse. (this is the TB in the videos)
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...pse11f1671.jpg
    2. fixed under saddle within several rides of forward and asking for stretch
    no more curling. Also with lunging using the neck stretcher and side rein.
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...pse635d07a.jpg

    1. curling horse
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps3eccceb9.jpg
    2. fixed under saddle over the course of 1 year with the "bump" method:
    no more curling:
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps196774ba.jpg
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...pse4d0cad5.jpg
    Yes, this is the infamous HH as a 4 and 5 y/o. : )

    1. I wish I had a curling pic of this horse. He was the WORST and had me in tears sometimes.
    2. I fixed him with a bump technique incorporation the lunge and use of a veinna rein.
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps0c425541.jpg
    Allison Sprenger now rides him.

    1. (my fav of course) curling baby Boomer at age 4
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...psd04b02df.jpg
    2. no curling Boomer at age 6
    Long/Deep/Low technique used for 6 months or so..
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps77ec02dd.jpg

    That all being said, I don't think the OPs horsie is in danger of curling. He's fairly stiff and short necked.
    It's usually the horses who have neck to spare and are made of silly putty who curl because it's sooo easy with a great long bendy neck.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

    Comment


    • I think I need to clarify. There are some horses who I work on working deep...and others that I do not because they natural go there...so my focus is a bit different.

      I was riding my two today, one I don't really think I ride deep and my other guy who I DO work on getting deep and decided that what I'm really doing is working them in the same general shape....it is just that with the mare, she is there without any work so it isn't my focus.
      Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Feb. 16, 2013, 10:07 PM.
      ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

      Comment


      • Purplnurpl- when you say the "bump" method, so you mean a short, upward pull with one of the reins every time the horse drops behind the bit?

        I have a curler who will stretch downward, long-and-low at all three gaits (quite happily) but as soon as you start to shorten the reins you get a short, curled neck. I've had some people tell me to do "bump" method, others say do long and low and gradually shorten the rein. Unfortunately, I feel like neither provides a consistent result.

        I can get her to push into the bridle with more of a training level neck position when I get her forward. But as soon as start to ask for her to engage a bit more and take more weight behind (say with a shoulder-in, so its not like I'm half-halting with the reins and she's responding to that), the curling starts as soon as that hind leg starts stepping under. She doesn't ever drop the contact when she curls, just very light and not actively seeking it.

        Its the worst at the canter, which can be very nicely balanced, straight, and forward but still never really opening up that throat latch. Counter canter helps, shoulder-in at the canter helps, but I always feel like I'm begging her to stretch her neck out.

        I can get a couple good strides with the "bump" method, but then lose it. Do I just need to be more consistent and keep with it? I'll admit, I might have given up on the bump method too soon since I felt like I could never get her to stay out on the contact for more than a few strides and thought it just wouldn't work with her. Maybe I need to send her to you.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Eventer13 View Post
          Purplnurpl- when you say the "bump" method, so you mean a short, upward pull with one of the reins every time the horse drops behind the bit?
          answered via PM
          http://kaboomeventing.com/
          http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
          Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

          Comment


          • A 'bump' for me is a quick lift of both hands. Very quick-not harsh in any way- and NOT pulling back.

            My 2cents. Not an expert at all To me, an honest connection to the bridle=and honest connection...and the horse should be able to be ridden up or down or long or short from the leg and seat w/ receiving hand. All horses have different head/neck conformation, so what is 'correct' will look different for each and every horse. Just like riders with correct, effective positions don't all look exactly the same.

            Personally, I don't work my horse low-deep-round because that's where he wants to go naturally. We do incorporate stretching...which is a 'connected' stretch that honestly looks more like low-deep-round than a flappy rein nose to floor 'stretch down'.

            Here's a little training progression of him...this is over ~5months from start to finish, last year when I officially restarted him. He is OTTB.

            Curling, behind leg.


            Next step, stretch. (CONNECTED stretch)


            Finding the bit


            Putting it all together


            Edited to add: his length of stride changes SO much in this photo series...which proves...yes any horse can have a bigger trot with training!
            What these photos don't show is that Pie was verryyyy tense....we are NOW a year later finally getting the last picture type of consistency at horse shows! I posted a video earlier on this thread.
            Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
            Creative Director, Equestrian Culture Magazine
            Take us to print!

            Comment


            • The two posts that show photos series are actually very interesting.

              I hate to do this but it is a VERY good visual. I wish leah had more horses to post.

              But if readers would go back and look at each series. It's basically 1. a rider who rides each and every horse in a deep frame that encourages easy use of the back and IMO gets the youngsters into their first moments of schwung.
              and 2. a rider who does not spend much time in the frame.
              Look at the spot just behind the saddle and down the flank in all the photos.
              The horses who spend quite a bit of time in a deep frame during their early development are more substantial in that area. Look at the entire hip as well as the engagement of the hind limbs. Note differences. Even with the OTTB-- the two photos of him show a difference of 3.5 months and only about 2 rides a week with often a full week off from being ridden.

              just incase:
              Schwung is swing through the horse's back allowing his limbs to move freely and efficiently. Almost like a puppet on a swing.

              **To emulate schwung yourself. Stand up. Bend over so that you are looking at the floor and lift your back so that it has a roach. And then, keeping your arms limp like noodles...start swinging them forward and back allowing a bounce through your elbows. Be sure to stay very loose through the shoulder socket..almost like it can pop right out..

              Now to get the opposite. Keep your back stiff with an arch and swing your arms with no bounce in your elbow.

              The first should make you feel great. Like a stretching massage. The second...not so great. Your back should cramp.

              This is EXACTLY how our horses feel.

              Also, in each position, try to tuck your butt underneath your body. This is how our young or green horses feel. If you do it in the 2nd position I bet your horse will tell you to [blank] off.

              this is very well said:
              an honest connection to the bridle = the horse should be able to be ridden up or down or long or short from the leg and seat w/ receiving hand. All horses have different head/neck conformation, so what is 'correct' will look different for each and every horse.

              The bump:
              When I bump there is usually a lot of leg and often a tap tap tap of the whip involved. The portion of the bump that bumps their body into the contact is quite important and most likely a make it or break it moment.


              Personally, I don't work my horse low-deep-round because that's where he wants to go naturally.
              This is very nice. Take advantage. You don't have to work to get the horse there so once he's working over his back then send his butt very forward to encourage a very large step and hopefully you will feel the transition into schwung.
              Because with these younger horses like our OTTBs who tend to be a bit tight it will feel like a lightbulp went off. Almost like a transition into your butt.


              Last edited by purplnurpl; Feb. 17, 2013, 12:10 PM.
              http://kaboomeventing.com/
              http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
              Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

              Comment


              • For the OP: (and this comes from someones who always says its the rider/etc)....have you had a vet do flexions? Although he does warm up and more free, he is irregular in front going to the left. Imho this is not about the exercises to be chosen. I would have him hoof tested and flexed.

                The second set of progression pix never shows a horse which is up/open/or with the chest lifted, and the first three show a horse which is broken at the third vertebrae (which means the neck is compressed and the horse is not seeking the hand). This is incorrect because of the (mis)alignment of vertebral bodies. The first set is somewhat better, but the horse does not show an slight ifv/open throat latch in any of the pix (which is desired by the directives/rules).

                Horses should keep the chest lifted and arc out to the bridle EVEN WHEN they are doing the exercise which is in the tests of chewing the reins forward/down/and out. Any hh is (a lightly vertical action) to change balance, not chasing the horse with the leg.

                Ldr/rk is an invention of the last 20 years, and it is very problematic for a number of reasons. First, it goes against the directives for training. But, One of two things is happening if it is done: either the horse has lost balance/energy/closed the throat latch/etc OR the rider is intentionally creating this posture (interesting that the riders also show the same postures as the horses). IF half halts have worked correctly the horse will stay up and open and active (because an upright posture is what compresses the hindlegs/gives thrust).

                But my question is always (for someone who jumps): Would you ride to a fence in such a posture? Then why would you train on the flat in that way? The dynamics are the same. Obviously the bascule would not be an even arc/correct if the approach was like that. There is a reason that the rules (for training) are written as they are.

                And the biped analogy of hollow back does not quite work because we are not quadrupeds, our joints bend opposite of horses (our arms are more like quarters/and legs like forelegs...so our head would have to be on the opposite end), because our necks are far shorter, and because we have a collarbones. No we dont want hollow the back in the horse, but the balancing rod of the horse is a neck which is allowed to be freely used (ie how does the horse get out of trouble at a fence?).
                I.D.E.A. yoda

                Comment


                • ideayoda~ can you show us a correct set of pictures then?
                  Photos only show a moment in time...I am not proclaiming to be a professional of any kind. This is my personal horse and a few photos that show a training progression from over a year ago.

                  Pie HAD a big 'bump' in his neck from breaking at the 3rd vertebrae for so long~ he was a pony horse on the track before I got him, and he carried himself in a super curled, tense tight position at all gaits. The muscling is diminishing, as you will see in pics of the progression, and becoming more 'correct.'
                  Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
                  Creative Director, Equestrian Culture Magazine
                  Take us to print!

                  Comment


                  • About 3/4 of the way down the page there is a grey horse which is going fdo correctly albeit low: http://www.sustainabledressage.net/rollkur/why_not.php And obviously a horse with baggage is almost in negative territory, and the needs clearer direction from the rider to change from being held in (as a pony horse) to seeking the hand. But that means opening the throat latch (there is a 67 page discussion of that in the french discussion on the dressage section). Reschooling is never easy, and for me for such a horse I would start with work in hand and exercises when mounted which cause the horse to be more upright (like a reverse pirouette).

                    And I take it that the horse changes its balance, does come up/etc when presented with a fence (right?).
                    I.D.E.A. yoda

                    Comment


                    • Where that grey horse is...is what I'm trying for with horse that I'm working deep. My main issue is getting them to let go at the base of their neck...and dealing with muscles from bracing in racing built up under their neck. Takes time to convince them to balance and relax in a different manner.
                      ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                      Comment


                      • FIRST the horse goes up/open/active, then it can 'chew the reins from the hand' into a fdo gesture (not the other way round). Working deep or ldr has a closed posture and a totally different action (bit on bars) and in the hind legs.
                        I.D.E.A. yoda

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by ideayoda View Post
                          FIRST the horse goes up/open/active, then it can 'chew the reins from the hand' into a fdo gesture (not the other way round). Working deep or ldr has a closed posture and a totally different action (bit on bars) and in the hind legs.
                          correct. but when dealing with OTTBs it can take time and work to undo the muscling and reactions from bracing racing.
                          ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by ideayoda View Post
                            FIRST the horse goes up/open/active, then it can 'chew the reins from the hand' into a fdo gesture (not the other way round). Working deep or ldr has a closed posture and a totally different action (bit on bars) and in the hind legs.
                            I think you are having a slight semantics problem with some of what was said on this thread. I mean that in the nicest possible way, as I sincerely respect your dressage knowledge. I am certainly not talking about rollkur or what ever that website you posted was showing. I suspect that what many of us refer to as "deep" is substanially different than what you think it is. And I know myself, and others on here are talking for the most part about re-training race horses.

                            Yes, horses come up and change their shape when jumping. No, no one on here is riding their horse nose to its chest to a jump. No one on here is talking about nose to chest period.

                            And regarding "poll not highest part of the neck" you fix it later, once the horse has enough physical strength to hold itself correctly. It takes time to make muscles, specifically the hind end muscles strong enough to go FORWARD and carry, and to retrain the muscles made in the horse's first career, but I suspect that you know that

                            Here's my chestnut curler:

                            First ride post racing: http://www.flickr.com/photos/9244445...in/photostream

                            After six months of training by me- much better but not 100%: http://www.flickr.com/photos/9244445...in/photostream
                            Last edited by Judysmom; Feb. 17, 2013, 07:43 PM. Reason: there vs their
                            Unrepentant carb eater

                            Comment


                            • Great discussion going on here... I stumbled over a video which I think fits in here perfectly.. It shows very nice what kind of riding will improve the trot. Its a mixture of riding forward, changing gaits, riding over poles and stretching....
                              Sorry its German...
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JLNG...ature=youtu.be
                              https://www.facebook.com/Luckyacresfarm
                              https://www.facebook.com/Ulrike-Bsch...4373849955364/

                              Comment


                              • The link I posted was not to be about the rk, it was about how the horse stretches (the grey horse), the opening of the throatlatch (not about the rest, except how the horse functions). And since horses trot around the pasture freely up and open, they are strong enough to seek the hand, it is more mental reactions (to the bit/the hand) and duration which is developed. (And I deal with a lot of ottb and plain brown wrappers which are to be retrained.)

                                Elongating the outline (it is not really stretching per se) is only done properly if the horse carries with its entire top line (into a forward/down/out posture), a closed outline means the throatlatch posture is the same whether the horse is up or down, and if down/closed it is the underneck which is carrying its weight with the nuchal ligament in constant tension and the parotid glands are pushed out.

                                Ideally the poll is always the highest point (of the skelton), but the lower the horse goes the more important it is that the horse opens the throat latch and arcs/arches out to the hand (especially in retraining the mouth/bearing/balance).. That is why ground work is so important as well in reforming dynamics and proper reactions to the hand and not just letting the horse remain closed or low.

                                The (german) video is to address pure rhythm (takt), suppleness (lateral flexibility leading to longitudinal flexion (losgelassenheit), and contact (ahnlenung). Contact in the german scala is progressive meeting of the hand and flexion over time (as the hindlegs allow it).

                                For sure the good part of an event rider is that they ideally hack out, do caveletti, and apply lots of different exercises which change the balance/bearing/reaction systems.
                                I.D.E.A. yoda

                                Comment


                                • Thank you for Ideayoda for explaining the video... And I still think, this is the correct way to improve the trog and its lenghtening...
                                  https://www.facebook.com/Luckyacresfarm
                                  https://www.facebook.com/Ulrike-Bsch...4373849955364/

                                  Comment


                                  • To bring this back to the OP...this is a good scoring training level test (one of my horses ridden by a Pro). It scored a bit outrageously well....a 13 something (and even more obnoxiously...it was the 2nd place dressage score). But I would generally say this was more of a low 20 test.

                                    This horse is on the flashy side but I would not say he is an outstanding mover. He is a good mover and better now as he is getting stronger but my trainer rode for every point she could. He is a VERY tough horse to ride and she has him as connected as he could be at this point in his training.

                                    This horse has never seen a pair of draw reins in his life (I started him as a 3 year old and have owned him since he was 2--and known him his whole life).

                                    The video of your horse shows a lovely horse. He looks a touch sore up front (is he barefoot?). But he is a horse that is a good enough mover that with the right training will be competitive. You do not need an outrageous or fancy mover to be competitive in eventing.

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_z7NxVQO8E
                                    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Feb. 17, 2013, 10:16 PM. Reason: typo
                                    ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                                    Comment



                                    • For sure the good part of an event rider is that they ideally hack out, do caveletti, and apply lots of different exercises which change the balance/bearing/reaction systems.
                                      I thought this was funny.
                                      "It's a good thing you guys hack out, do caveletti and apply lots of different exercises because your work on the flat sucks."
                                      http://kaboomeventing.com/
                                      http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                                      Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                                      Comment


                                      • Originally posted by ideayoda View Post
                                        Elongating the outline (it is not really stretching per se) is only done properly if the horse carries with its entire top line (into a forward/down/out posture), a closed outline means the throatlatch posture is the same whether the horse is up or down, and if down/closed it is the underneck which is carrying its weight with the nuchal ligament in constant tension and the parotid glands are pushed out.


                                        OK I now understand what you were getting at. Point taken.
                                        Unrepentant carb eater

                                        Comment


                                        • Not at all purpl...... the purely flat riders do not have the amount of ammunition to change their horse's postures as easily...and they do not understand the implications of closing/holding a horse (to a fence) in the same way a jump rider does. (Yet what do I see before a dressage ride at an event: lower/rounder/lower/rounder...who would say that if they want to jump clean. Don't copy the flat riders (unless you want to do a rotational).
                                          I.D.E.A. yoda

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X