• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

WWYD? Road riding in the dark?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WWYD? Road riding in the dark?

    Road riding in the dark: Safe, or no?

    We're talking relatively back roads, not a ton of traffic - I saw maybe a dozen cars in an hour or so, mid-afternoon, and never more than one at a time (no cars trying to pass in opposite directions).

    If properly decked out in reflective gear and lights, a la cyclist-style, do you think it would be safe to ride a few times a week either at sunrise or just after dusk? I'm facing some difficult decisions and financially won't be able to afford to haul to an arena more than about once a week until I either get a raise or a better job (or one with different hours). I've got studs and can do some light work in our field, but the road is nice for long walks and trot sets (we live just a hair under 2 miles from town in a straight line).

    Thoughts? I don't mind getting rained on at all. I just don't want to get hit by a car! Cyclists ride on the road after dark all the time, right?

  • #2
    I think with the proper reflective gear it would be okay. I would learn all the spots where you could safely get off the road in case you needed to. I use to have to ride to lessons (it was dusk on the way home) but I was able to ride far enough off the road to feel safe.
    Dawn

    Patience and Consistency are Your Friends

    Comment


    • #3
      I only do it if I know there's going to be room for me to get a few feet off the pavement almost all the way. If there are places along the way where I can't do that, I just have to stop, look, listen, then hurry on past the bad spot.

      Some drivers won't give you an inch even if it's a back road with no traffic.

      BE CAREFUL

      Comment


      • #4
        I would not do this unless it was absolutely necessary.

        I thought nothing of hacking on the road at dusk until a mare I was riding slipped on unseen black ice, did the splits, snapped her elbow and had to be put down.

        In this day, it's too dangerous. People know nothing of horses and drive much too fast. Even with all the high-viz in the world, an ignorant redneck can KILL you. I was lucky. I just lost a horse.

        Wait until it gets lighter in the spring and meanwhile hack in your field and save roading for weekends in daylight.
        Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
        Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

        Comment


        • #5
          ^^ best advice. LOL

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't ride ON the road. I will ride on a shoulder if it is wide enough that I am in the grass on the other side of a ditch with plenty of room between me and traffic. But on the road itself? I think I would have grave concerns about being hit or horse slipping.
            Life doesn't have perfect footing.

            Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
            We Are Flying Solo

            Comment


            • #7
              I should have made it clear that it's mostly DIRT roads that I ride on. Sometimes I just have to cross or go a very short distance on a paved road.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                And I should have clarified - this is a straight, flat, 2 mile long stretch of road that takes you to a 25mph zone and then a stoplight in town. No hills, no corners, not crowned at all, 35mph speed limit - it is right near a newer residential neighborhood, so not the crazy 65mph+ drivers of your typical "back road". There is a shoulder in some spots, driveways and such that I can get off the road if need be, although I can see & be seen from a pretty far distance anyway.

                I just came in from a quick ~3 mile jaunt down and back and encountered maybe 10 cars? All passed reasonably respectfully, and the big horse pays no mind to them anyway. The ones that slow way, way down actually cause more trouble than those that just continue on by. I live in an agricultural town, where the Circle K even has hitching posts. Mr. Heinz works at one of the grocery stores in town and I really wish they'd put in a hitching post - I'd happily take the horse grocery shopping.

                Comment


                • #9
                  One time a dog came out of a field and started barking and my horse swung around and was in the road before I knew it.

                  I just think you need to be EXTREMELY cautious and always expect the unexpected. Something WILL happen. For me it's extremely difficult to enjoy riding, much less get anything accomplished, under such circumstances.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by rtph View Post
                    One time a dog came out of a field and started barking and my horse swung around and was in the road before I knew it.

                    I just think you need to be EXTREMELY cautious and always expect the unexpected. Something WILL happen. For me it's extremely difficult to enjoy riding, much less get anything accomplished, under such circumstances.
                    Horse is dog broke, gun broke, car broke, weather broke... my biggest concern is being visible to cars so we don't get hit, frankly. I know today was daylight, but we practiced leg yeilds and shoulder in and medium-free-medium walks and pretty much everything else we do in our regular rides at a walk/trot with the exception of circles, and even those can be done 10m at a time if I'm really feeling ambitious.

                    I'm going to think on it some more, and pay closer attention when I drive it tonight on my way to the store for blind spots and other low-vis issues.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would think sunrise would be safer than sunset, less people drunk at 6 am than 6 pm. Get one of the reflective quarter sheets, Horze makes one that has a reflective shoulder guard too.
                      Unrepentant carb eater

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I got into huge trouble with the parents for riding in the pitch black back in the day. So much trouble that they sprang for the difference between lessons on my horse and a school horse and gave me rides in the car. However, that being said, I used to ride the fire roads and trails around my house in the pitch black all the time, no car traffic to speak of. Horses see fine in the dark.

                        Now, we get less than twenty cars go by here every day and if it were a two lane road and dirt or one lane with big shoulders I'd go road riding a lot more - but I don't like the pavement and no shoulder. There's like three feet of ditch and trash and nasty barbed wire fence at the edge, and in some spots the pavement just drops right off to nothing, no shoulder at all - and there have been a fair number of cars getting in single car accidents due to that. The other thing is that the UPS lady and the Fed Ex guy drive like maniacs and they're the scary ones. For some reason it's also really hard to hear a car coming - there's far away background freeway and train noise and lots of wind in the trees and creek noises - a real pain when I'm walking the dog and throwing sticks for him so he's off the leash.

                        Totally your call - I really like the availability of good high visibility gear nowadays and if you have good lines of sight and plenty of room then go for it.
                        Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                        Incredible Invisible

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'd actually be more worried about drunks at 6 am than 6 pm since they're probably coming home/back from wherever they were. I'd even put flashing bicycle lights on you and/or your horse. That way you can still be seen if there arent head lights.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Heinz 57 View Post
                            Road riding in the dark: Safe, or no?

                            We're talking relatively back roads, not a ton of traffic - I saw maybe a dozen cars in an hour or so, mid-afternoon, and never more than one at a time (no cars trying to pass in opposite directions).

                            If properly decked out in reflective gear and lights, a la cyclist-style, do you think it would be safe to ride a few times a week either at sunrise or just after dusk? I'm facing some difficult decisions and financially won't be able to afford to haul to an arena more than about once a week until I our field, but the road is nice for long walks and trot sets (we live just a hair under 2 miles from town in a straight line).
                            either get a raise or a better job (or one with different hours). I've got studs and can do some light work in
                            Thoughts? I don't mind getting rained on at all. I just don't want to get hit by a car! Cyclists ride on the road after dark all the time, right?

                            Cyclists do it all the time.

                            ======================================


                            Yes they do and they get hit all the time.

                            Dusk and dawn are the worst times.

                            If you are riding to the west at dusk, the driver coming up behind you will be blinded by the sun and if the wind shield has the smallest amount of dirt on it, road oil, bugs, etc., he is blinded.

                            Same going to the east at dawn.

                            Has your horse ever shied? What if something in the ditch makes him shy into the road?

                            70 years ago, it was not dangerous. Today, it is.

                            There must be a small field close by where you can simulate riding in a ring.

                            Find one.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't have any advice either way, but the Europeans are excellent with their reflective gear, and Horze has a TON of it.
                              http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                You may have clear sight lines, but it won't to you a darn bit of good if the drivers aren't looking at the road. Give some thought to the number of people texting and driving, then decide if it's worth the risk of being hit by one of them.

                                Though honestly, it sounds like you've made up you're mind to do it and are just looking for validation.
                                Last edited by Snugglerug; Dec. 24, 2012, 10:14 PM. Reason: typo

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I understand why you are considering it but I would ask you to consider how catastrophic a wreck involving a car, a horse and a human can be. I have seen a horse hit by a car twice - once with a rider, once without. None of them survived. Luckily the drivers were ok but when you consider the damage a deer can do, imagine a horse going through a windshield? I dont think the risk coukd possibly be worth the gain. Please be careful.
                                  "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                                  ---
                                  The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I'm nervous as hell when doing it in broad daylight, on virtually empty country roads. I have my head on a swivel the whole time.

                                    There is absolutely no way I would even consider doing it near dawn, dusk, or during night time.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by cssutton View Post

                                      There must be a small field close by where you can simulate riding in a ring.

                                      Find one.
                                      Your optimism is inspiring. However, I live in something reminiscent of a swamp right now. Very, very flat valley, all hay fields that are currently partially under water - no riding allowed. My own back yard is turning into a muck hole and my pasture is quickly becoming unrideable. It's been a very rainy fall and early winter and the creek that runs through our property overflowed, putting over half our property under 1'+ of water. A friend has an outdoor that I can haul to, however she will only allow it to be used when it's not pouring (fat chance here in Oregon!). Once or twice a month if I'm lucky.

                                      Snugglerug, I haven't made up my mind yet, and frankly don't require the validation of a bunch of internet strangers to do or not do something. I was interested in hearing others' thoughts on the idea and am talking it out. I may give it a try sometime this week to see how it goes, if I feel safe or not. I appreciate everyone's concern and didn't realize that, for some people, riding on the roads was so very very taboo. It's not really a big deal around these parts.

                                      This is not a spooky horse. The worst he does is eye the cows and puff up across the bridge over the creek - road lines, dogs, sheep, cars, big diesel trucks, funny looking stuff, puddles, garbage, street signs, gunshots, play structures, junk, running water, none of that bothers him. He's a lazy, nearly 15 year old OTTB. I would never consider this on a different horse. My biggest concern would be staying visible to drivers - flashing lights, reflective gear, whatever is necessary.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I wouldn't. Not near dusk or dawn. Nor any other time unless with all the precautions mentioned and a sense that the drivers in your area will be used to horse traffic, which I guess is possible since you mentioned the hitching posts.
                                        If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X