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"Tragedy" of errors at CCI* in Kentucky. Long rant.

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  • "Tragedy" of errors at CCI* in Kentucky. Long rant.

    So I had this great weekend planned for a group of friends. What a fiasco it turned out to be and how UNIMPRESSED my friends were with the eventing world.

    Sorry, but I spent a LOT and my friends spent a LOT in time and $$$ for all this and so I'm venting (AND filling out a very negative report on it, too! I have every intention of letting USEA and the organizers hear my vent, too!).

    I AM APPALLED by the organization of this event. Not just that they cancelled the steeplechase--indeed, given the conditions, that was understandable. The problem was the dreadful lack of communication under conditions that could have resulted in real tragedy.

    I'd love to hear from others who may have gone through dealing with a rider fall/injury, since this was my first time having to deal with it: Christan took a bad fall on her first horse...and it took 45 minutes for those of us waiting in the barn and in the vet box area to even KNOW THAT SHE HAD FALLEN!!!!!

    How can it be that people waiting in the vetbox have to run around asking where their rider is after horse after horse comes home and their rider doesn't? Why the heck wasn't the PA system working in the vet area or the barns during the CCI* cross country? Why didn't the organizers send a runner or something when she was taken to the medic?

    It's not like one can see the entire course to know what's going on, right? The announcer didn't follow the horses around the course consistently and there was a horrific echo in the PA system in the area where most of the spectators were, so it was barely understandable! I had four people standing on the best viewing hill and NONE OF THEM had a clue what had happened.

    In fact, so clueless were they that, to make matters worse, they actually mistook a gray horse walking back from the course to be Christan, when it was actually someone else--so there they sat, wondering why she failed to arrive when she was seen walking back...how riddiculous! I walk up, they say she's walking back, having had three refusals (which she HADN'T had at all--so unclear was the announcing as to what horse was being referred to!). I make the decision to meet her back at the barn, since who to be crowded by people after such embarassment as a three-refusal elimination, right?

    Turns out, that gray WASN'T Christan, she hadn't had refusals, she'd had a fall and we had no idea!!!! Indeed, the horse fell in such a way that it busted her girth and tossed her on her head, leaving her with very, very real short-term memory loss. (As I drove her to the hospital, she kept asking the same questions over and over again, never remembering that I'd already answered them. Scary! And then the doctor doesn't tell the nurse about the memory issue, so the nurse asks her about something and actually gets pissed off when Christan claims the nurse never asked her! Unbelievable! And there was more involving the hospital, but this isn't the forum for that--only thing I shoudl say is that if you ever get hospitalized in KY, make sure someone is there to check and double check on what is happening to you!)

    Meanwhile, those medical armbands? How come no one actually USES them? I'm a bit outraged that the medic didn't refer to the armband. It's dangerous to assume that everyone associated with a rider KNOWS the rider's history and/or knows the nature of eventing or whatever, right? What if it's some young adult showing alone, no family or friends with him or her, jsut strangers trying to help out? The medic knows about the armband and what information is on it, right? The medic should know how it should be used, right? So shouldn't the medic inform whoever takes charge of the rider afterward, be it EMTs or friendly strangers or business associates (like us)? Christan rides for me, but I don't know her allergies, her parents' contact information, her medical coverage, her past injuries...Isn't that armband supposed to have that information on it and be referred to when these things arise? She was wearing one, but when I finally found her in the secretary's stand, no one mentioned it--and here I was with a head injury and a not-very-coherent person on the way to the hospital!

    Egad! My friends--potential Connor sponsors, in fact--were equally appalled. How the heck can one get SUPPORT for a talented horse when it seems that all he's doing is competing in some half-assed sport where people risk their necks and no one knows what to do when something goes wrong? I'm NOT a hands-on owner. I haven't watched Con compete in over two years (I went to AEC, but I didn't watch him go). I seriously doubt I'm that unusual or that Christan's situation--competing alone or with very little help--is that unusual either...right?

    So what is the sport's responsibility here? I know that people have thought this over carefully--that's where the armband and other safety requirements came from...but at this event, someone really dropped the ball and it presented a very, very bad example for my friends and Connor's supporters.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.
  • Original Poster

    #2
    So I had this great weekend planned for a group of friends. What a fiasco it turned out to be and how UNIMPRESSED my friends were with the eventing world.

    Sorry, but I spent a LOT and my friends spent a LOT in time and $$$ for all this and so I'm venting (AND filling out a very negative report on it, too! I have every intention of letting USEA and the organizers hear my vent, too!).

    I AM APPALLED by the organization of this event. Not just that they cancelled the steeplechase--indeed, given the conditions, that was understandable. The problem was the dreadful lack of communication under conditions that could have resulted in real tragedy.

    I'd love to hear from others who may have gone through dealing with a rider fall/injury, since this was my first time having to deal with it: Christan took a bad fall on her first horse...and it took 45 minutes for those of us waiting in the barn and in the vet box area to even KNOW THAT SHE HAD FALLEN!!!!!

    How can it be that people waiting in the vetbox have to run around asking where their rider is after horse after horse comes home and their rider doesn't? Why the heck wasn't the PA system working in the vet area or the barns during the CCI* cross country? Why didn't the organizers send a runner or something when she was taken to the medic?

    It's not like one can see the entire course to know what's going on, right? The announcer didn't follow the horses around the course consistently and there was a horrific echo in the PA system in the area where most of the spectators were, so it was barely understandable! I had four people standing on the best viewing hill and NONE OF THEM had a clue what had happened.

    In fact, so clueless were they that, to make matters worse, they actually mistook a gray horse walking back from the course to be Christan, when it was actually someone else--so there they sat, wondering why she failed to arrive when she was seen walking back...how riddiculous! I walk up, they say she's walking back, having had three refusals (which she HADN'T had at all--so unclear was the announcing as to what horse was being referred to!). I make the decision to meet her back at the barn, since who to be crowded by people after such embarassment as a three-refusal elimination, right?

    Turns out, that gray WASN'T Christan, she hadn't had refusals, she'd had a fall and we had no idea!!!! Indeed, the horse fell in such a way that it busted her girth and tossed her on her head, leaving her with very, very real short-term memory loss. (As I drove her to the hospital, she kept asking the same questions over and over again, never remembering that I'd already answered them. Scary! And then the doctor doesn't tell the nurse about the memory issue, so the nurse asks her about something and actually gets pissed off when Christan claims the nurse never asked her! Unbelievable! And there was more involving the hospital, but this isn't the forum for that--only thing I shoudl say is that if you ever get hospitalized in KY, make sure someone is there to check and double check on what is happening to you!)

    Meanwhile, those medical armbands? How come no one actually USES them? I'm a bit outraged that the medic didn't refer to the armband. It's dangerous to assume that everyone associated with a rider KNOWS the rider's history and/or knows the nature of eventing or whatever, right? What if it's some young adult showing alone, no family or friends with him or her, jsut strangers trying to help out? The medic knows about the armband and what information is on it, right? The medic should know how it should be used, right? So shouldn't the medic inform whoever takes charge of the rider afterward, be it EMTs or friendly strangers or business associates (like us)? Christan rides for me, but I don't know her allergies, her parents' contact information, her medical coverage, her past injuries...Isn't that armband supposed to have that information on it and be referred to when these things arise? She was wearing one, but when I finally found her in the secretary's stand, no one mentioned it--and here I was with a head injury and a not-very-coherent person on the way to the hospital!

    Egad! My friends--potential Connor sponsors, in fact--were equally appalled. How the heck can one get SUPPORT for a talented horse when it seems that all he's doing is competing in some half-assed sport where people risk their necks and no one knows what to do when something goes wrong? I'm NOT a hands-on owner. I haven't watched Con compete in over two years (I went to AEC, but I didn't watch him go). I seriously doubt I'm that unusual or that Christan's situation--competing alone or with very little help--is that unusual either...right?

    So what is the sport's responsibility here? I know that people have thought this over carefully--that's where the armband and other safety requirements came from...but at this event, someone really dropped the ball and it presented a very, very bad example for my friends and Connor's supporters.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

    Comment


    • #3
      Is your rider OK?

      Sounds like the EMT's dropped the ball?
      The witchy witch witch of south central NC.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah I evented "alone" once- I brought an old friend from high school that used to ride back in the day. I was afraid of something happening....who would drive the trailer back? Who would contact the 'rents?

        Hope Christan is ok.
        GO TARHEELS!
        COMH
        http://community.webshots.com/user/funnyknuckles
        http://community.webshots.com/user/funnyknuckles2

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm so sorry to hear of Christan's fall, I hope she is OK???? It won't be the first bad hospital experience she's had, and the other one wasn't in KY!!

          I'm not sure about all the circumstances there, I agree it does not sound well organized. But in my one experience with a bad fall at an event, I assure you that the EMTs were there, although I tried to get up on my own they wouldn't let me and they took me to the hospital in the ambulance. My horse was taken care of, and the organizers (Pine Top) even came to visit me in the hospital that weekend despite running a busy event! My experience with the safety procedures in that case was *very* positive, so hopefully this was just a one time scenario.

          Comment


          • #6
            It is sometimes a policy NOT to report injuries on the PA system.

            But the vet box SHOULD have been in radio communication with someone on the cross country course who could report on the whereabouts of each rider. Are you sure you aked the right people in the vet box?

            Medical cards are a mixed blessing. EMTs have told me that they would be considered negligent if they took ANY particular action based on something like a medical card (e.g. blood type, allergies or lack thereoff), without independant confirmation. But the hospital is definitely going to want the insurance information.

            Short term memory loss, including asking the same questions OVER and OVER and OVER again, and forgetting that you asked, or were asked, a question earlier, is a VERY common sumpton of concussion. Scary the first time you encounter it, but very common. I am suprised the hospital staff weren't more familiar with it. Every time I have been to a hospital for concussion (either my own, or with someone who had one), the ER staff has dealt with it perfectly well.
            Janet

            chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).

            Comment


            • #7
              There are event evaluation forms at the USEA website that anyone competing can fill out. As the owner of a competing horse I believe you certainly are entitled to report what happened and how it happened on the form. I know that the forms are at the Area 2 website, as you were in KY., perhaps check that area's website for it. Event evaluation forms really help to pinpoint the lacking qualities and help provide info to all without personalization. JMO.
              Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
              Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>But the vet box SHOULD have been in radio communication with someone on the cross country course who could report on the whereabouts of each rider. Are you sure you aked the right people in the vet box? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                I can atest to the fact that the vet box DID have a radio and more or less DID know. Dr. Debbie had 2 in fact and there was another under the tent. After looking up Christian's number, I do recall hearing something about horse #49 and knew not to look for them in the box any time soon -- and I was a lowly temp-taker.

                As an announcer, I am often leary about announcing injuries, especially of the ambulance variety -- if not downright told not to announce it. Had a young rider taken to the hospital with serious injuries at an event this year and I announced VERY little of it at the time other than a hold on course and the timing of resuming the action. After we heard back from the hospital I announced her condition, etc., but at the time I don't think it's necessarily appropriate to announce things over the PA when 1) you have other riders preparing to go and 2) without a thorough evaluation by an MD all you have is speculation and that is NOT what is needed to announce.

                I have no problem with your vent or the need to vent to the appropriate people, but had a few thoughts on what you had written from my perspective.

                I do hope Christian is ok!!
                ************
                "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

                "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike

                Comment


                • #9
                  Erm, maybe I'm missing something... it's kind of hard to figure out what actually happened from the original post, because the actual facts are mixed in with lots of ranting.

                  It sounds like your major beef is that someone didn't come running to find you after the rider had a fall, and that you weren't able to find her yourself immediately due to the fact that there was some confusion as to where she was and what had happened on course.

                  Maybe I'm just an easygoing person, but I don't really see any reason to get pissy at the event, the USEA, or the organizers. It sounds like the rider was seen by a medic, and she had people with her until you found her. It's not like the EMT said "You have a concussion. Go find someone to drive you to the hospital," and then turned her loose.

                  It is not at all unusual for there to be confusion about what happened to a certain horse. There are certain people who have radios and who know these things, and other people are left guessing. If you want to know what happened, you find one of those people who actually knows.

                  I guess I just don't see that it's the responsibility of the event to rush right out to find you and tell you your rider fell... especially when she's up and walking around. I'm not even sure I'd think it was their responsibility if she was carted off in the ambulance. Their responsibility is to get the rider the medical attention she needs. If that rider has support people there with them, I figure it's the support people's responsibility to figure out where the rider is. It's not the event's responsibility to track you down and let you know.

                  As for the medical armbands, I've never thought they were particularly useful myself. As Janet said, no EMT is going to take its word as gospel anyway.

                  I'm sorry you had such a traumatic weekend, but honestly, it sounds to me like you're just lashing out at the event in frustration. Yes, it's frustrating if an event doesn't have a good PA system. Yes, it's frustrating if you get different stories every time you talk to a different volunteer. But if you know how the heirarchy of volunteers works at an event, it's not really very difficult to get to someone who knows what's going on.

                  And of course, it's the fact that there ARE all those volunteers -- not paid staff -- that keeps our entry fees relatively low.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Pwynn, I hope Christan is ok and I'm sorry you had a disappointing weekend. However, I do think that your condemnation of the event is unduly harsh.

                    You say <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The problem was the dreadful lack of communication under conditions that could have resulted in real tragedy. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I'm not sure that I follow this point. It seems that your not knowing what had happened to Christan was inconvenient and worrying, but not dangerous. So long as the medic knew where she was and was attending to her, the essential communication had taken place. Letting supporters know what is happening is secondary.

                    As for the armband, is your complaint that no one gave you the armband or the information that was in it? I don't think it is the medic's responsibility to brief the "friendly strangers or business associates" who may come to help the rider. It seems to me the questionable decision was not transporting Christan to the hospital in an ambulence. Once Christan refused that service and/or the medical personel determined it wasn't necessary, I don't think the competition organizers have any responsibility for seeing that she gets further care.

                    (Another note on medical armbands: they are really of very limited use. No medical responder is going to rely on them for essential information like blood type -- that sort of test would be repeated at the hospital. I'm not sure what information you needed that was on the armband but could not be obtained more reliably by the hospital.)

                    The sport's responsibility is to have qualified medical personel on hand to respond to an emergency. It isn't to provide support services to all riders -- for example, the organizers are not responsible for arranging transportation home if a competitor is injured and can't drive his/her trailer. It's very kind (and quite common) when organizers or fellow competitors do pitch in in situations like that, but it certainly isn't the responsibility of the sport.

                    And the quality of care at the hospital is clearly not the responsibility of the sport.

                    Again, I'm really sorry that it was a bad weekend. But I don't think it is fair to blame the sport or the organizers of this competition that your friends didn't get a good impression. So long as the horse and rider were attended to by the relevant personel in a timely fashion, the sport fulfilled its responsibilities. An announcement that said "Could a groom for Christan please report to Fence X" would have been helpful, but the absense of such an anouncement is not a dereliction of duty by the competition. Clear anouncements are a bonus. They certainly make competitons "classier" and I agree with you that they are an important part of professionalizing the sport. However, they are not one of the essential functions. --Jess

                    (edited to add -- Oy, posted just after Erin and had essentially the same thing to say. Oh well, I'll let mine stand, too.)

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Christan is fine now, although she thinks she may have broken her nose, too.

                      And one thing I fogot to emphasize in my rant was that, although I have issues with the organizers, the PEOPLE in eventing are wonderful. Everyone unofficial was very, very helpful. Luckily, there were enough of us to cover caring for the hroses, dealing with the vet and driving her rig back home.

                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Are you sure you aked the right people in the vet box? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                      Janet, the "right" people? WHO THE HECK ARE THEY? Do you see what I mean? If a rider just has an uninitiated helper in the box, how the heck is the helper supposed to know "the right person"? Is this sport going to start going the hunter-jumper route and expecting everyone to have a trainer, etc., who knows "the right people"!

                      *I* was running around trying to find Christan. Another person was in the vet area with all the equipment, wandering around asking where #48/9 (can't remember) was...She says she called out and someone finally said they'd been "looking" for her! Hey, how's this: maybe I should suggest a rule change wherein at x-level, the riders' help wears #s, too? But no, that wouldn't be necessary with effective communication.

                      And it's not that I'm thinking anyone should announce a rider injury. But heck yes, a FALL!!!

                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> ...the vet box did have a...more or less DID know <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                      Did know what? And since the horse was injured, too, we in the barn never heard from the person we left in the vet box either since she then became too busy dealing with the horse and the vet.

                      Again, NONE of this would have happened if the PA system worked and the announcer gave helpful information--like they do at most events. I think it was really that simple: make sure your communications work and, if they don't, compensate for them!
                      Sportponies Unlimited
                      Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> It is not at all unusual for there to be confusion about what happened to a certain horse. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                        Gotta go teach a class. More in a minute, but this is my point--thinking globally, not locally here.

                        And, remember, this isn't lashing out (not in my mind): it's a RANT. Rants ARE rants.
                        Sportponies Unlimited
                        Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by pwynnnorman:
                          Janet, the "right" people? WHO THE HECK ARE THEY? Do you see what I mean? If a rider just has an uninitiated helper in the box, how the heck is the helper supposed to know "the right person"? Is this sport going to start going the hunter-jumper route and expecting everyone to have a trainer, etc., who knows "the right people"!
                          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          It is the rider's responsibility to know the rules and set up of the competition. The rider, in turn, should have briefed her helpers so that they are able to provide any assistance the rider thinks she may need. This includes saying "This is the person who is in charge in the vet box. If anything goes wrong, he should be able to give you information." The organizers are NOT responsible for training grooms.

                          It sounds like both the rider and the horse got the prompt emergency attention they needed. That is what the organizers are responsible for facilitating. It's frustrating not to know what is happening -- and believe me, I've been in the 10 minute box at three days wondering what the HECK is going on, too -- but it is not one of the core obligations of the organizers to facilitate communication between support crew members. --Jess

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Janet, the "right" people? WHO THE HECK ARE THEY? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            Hmmm... perhaps someone who has a stethescope, clipboard and radio??? Perhaps "a vet" since there were in fact 2 in the box (one of whichis mandatory IIRC). an official, since there was 1 in the box. Seems this is a good lesson in educating the helpers as much as dealing with communication from the event. Like I said, I was neither an official nor did I have a radio but I knew that #49 had had some kind of incident, was not going to continue and remember hearing something about "nose" and "blood"... and that was inbetween trying to keep track of 4 different thermometers and 2 different scribe people!

                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Another person was in the vet area with all the equipment, wandering around asking where #48/9 (can't remember) was <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            Again, perhaps more education on the part of the helper is what was needed... especially since its freely admitted she couldn't remember the number. Vet box folks rarely look at names... it's the numbers that are important. If you can't remember your team's number, do you really expect us to know what the hell you're talking about?? get real.

                            I'm sorry you had a bad weekend. I'm sorry Christian got hurt. But the more you rant, the more I'm starting to side with Jess and Erin that your emotions and frustration are being taken out unfairly on the event and sport.
                            ************
                            "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

                            "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree with Erin and Jess wholeheartedly.
                              ***
                              The hardest to learn was the least complicated.

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                              • #16
                                Often the announcer is also “control” and has more on their plate than announcing what’s happening on course – ie: ensuring the paramedics are deployed and the appropriate officials are advised, that any necessary on course stops are on the clock and that there is a hold on the course until everything is clear, etc. In addition, for all the events that I control and announce, I do not announce when there has been a fall and skip on instead to thanking sponsors and volunteers, pointing people to the concessions, etc. This is what I have been requested to do by the organizers I have worked for. It sounds to me like your rider got the attention she needed but that it was frustrating for you trying to find out what happened to her. Usually ask anyone who looks official – anyone with a radio or a clipboard – and they’ll do their best to help.

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                                • #17
                                  If you haven't been around the block at a few dozen events, I'm sure it all LOOKS very confusing and unorganized. An event, especially a three-day, requires a virtual army of volunteers. We've all had our run-ins with clueless volunteers, I'm sure. But, again, they are VOLUNTEERS and because they are volunteers, ours is one of the cheaper sports to participate in.

                                  As I said in my original post, and as TLE and Jess have said, it usually isn't all that hard to figure out what's going on if you know who to talk to. A person with a clipboard or a radio is usually a safe bet. Believe me, I've *covered* really BIG events where I got frustrated as all hell because I kept getting different answers on things and had to run around tracking down all sorts of people. Yes, it happens, especially when it's NOT Rolex or something like that. But you know what? It's just not that big of a deal.

                                  I think Jess hit the nail on the head:

                                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I'm not sure that I follow this point. It seems that your not knowing what had happened to Christan was inconvenient and worrying, but not dangerous. So long as the medic knew where she was and was attending to her, the essential communication had taken place. Letting supporters know what is happening is secondary. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                                  Again, I'm sorry the rider fell and was hurt, and that you and the rest of her supporters spent some time wondering what had happened. And certainly, fill out the event evaluation form and let them know (NICELY) that it was difficult to hear the PA in the vet box or back at the barn or wherever.

                                  But, honestly, while you may think that the event could have done some things to make your life easier, I certainly don't think they are in any way at FAULT for not doing those things.

                                  Again, I think it's the support people's job to track down the rider. Not the event staff's job to track down the support people. It's like when you're talking with someone who's on a cell phone and the other person drops the call. I figure it's up to THEM to call ME back... if BOTH of us are trying to call the other, all we'll get are voicemail and busy signals.

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                                  • #18
                                    I understand your frustration regarding the confusion during the event but like others have said it is not the organizers job to educate the riders help. I have been a groom at several 3-days and the vet box can be chaotic, at best, if you don't know what is going on. When I am in the vet box waiting for my rider, I position myself near someone with a radio so I can follow what is going on. This is not always possible, I realize but if my rider is not in sight when she is expected, I search out someone with a radio and ask what is the status of rider so and so. As a groom I feel it is my responsibility to know where my rider and horse are at all times. I may not know the exact fence she is at but I do know her expected times at certain fences and at the vet box and if she is not there, you can bet your life I'm asking around and listening to any radio I can find. I am sorry that your weekend didn't turn out as expected and I'm glad that your rider will be okay, but these things do happen at 3-days and its your job to be prepared for the unexpected.
                                    Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.

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                                    • #19
                                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Janet, the "right" people? WHO THE HECK ARE THEY? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>In this context, "the right people" is "someone with a radio".

                                      Any one of the vets probably could have answered "who has a radio?"

                                      But in this case, I would have gone straight to the finish line timers. They USUALLY have a little bit of free time btween horses completing, so they can talk to you (unlike the vets in the vet box, who are busy continuously). And that are generally (after the EMTs themselves) the first ones to be informed that "horse X isn't going to be coming to the finish, so you can stop that stopwatch." And if they don't happen to remember WHY horse X isn't going to be finishing, they are usually in a good position to send out a radio request for "what is the status of (or "where is") rider X, we have a friend/groom/owner asking?"
                                      Janet

                                      chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).

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                                      • #20
                                        I am really sorry that Christan was hurt and fell at the event. So hard to have worked that hard, and then to have it end badly- both for you and her. My sympathies to all involved....

                                        I was at the event and showing. there was a lot of announcing going on- Stadium, dressage AND xc were all going on at the same point in time. Sunday, there were 2 rings being announced at the same time for Stadium.

                                        Yes, it can be confusing- and yes, it is really scary! I remember one event where tle was following me, and i fell at a fence (horse fell too...) and I stood up as quickly as I could to make sure they said nothing so she did not know that I had fallen. My SO was wondering where I was...and yes, there were moments of confusion. But, as a whole, the things that were done to ensure MY safety, as well as my horses, were done. He was kinda worked up...why didn't someone tell me? type thing, so I can understand where you are coming from.

                                        I was there when a horse fell at the road, as well as when a NOV rider fell. Both times, the medics were there ASAP, and the vet drove up just as hhfarm was leading the horse back to the barn. The rider ending up being okay- but scary, for sure. I heard them annoounce a couple of times for poople to meet at the steeplechase barn- so I think that there was good communication for the most part.

                                        I really hope that you can get to a point where you can see how the system works. It may have its faults, but everyone has the best interests of the riders and horses at heart. Of that I am sure. I am sorry that you had those horrid moments. I *hate* those- as a mom and a spouse of one that rides. When I fall, I know what is happening- when they fall, I am much more of a wreak! Never ever feel that you cannot ask anyone anything- everyone seems to want to help where ever they can. That is why I love eventing.

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