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Why are we not number one?

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  • Why are we not number one?

    Well, as the title says.....why are we not the top country for eventing?

    Two of our top riders are from Australia....? Yes, they are Americans NOW....but they didnt come here to learn to ride...

    Our best horses arent American as well?

    Why?
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com

  • #2
    Because the Europeans wanted to be competitive so they influenced the removal of the long format and thus their horses now seem unbeatable. I bet if there were roads and tracks, steeplechase.... North Americans and maybe Kiwis would be back on top.
    Boss Mare Eventing Blog
    https://www.youtube.com/user/jealoushe

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    • #3
      Because we've stopped being all around horsemen (like Bruce and Jimmy) who tried all the disciplines and have become a nation of eventers who are specialists. The Brits have a long history of foxhunting. The Kiwis and Aussies gallop across the fields jumping whatever is in front of them, (wire even), while our guys opt to polish their skills in rings and highly controlled environments. Diffetent outlooks.

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      • #4
        Money.
        Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
        Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

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        • #5
          Because no one wants to work for it.
          When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by flutie1 View Post
            Because we've stopped being all around horsemen (like Bruce and Jimmy) who tried all the disciplines and have become a nation of eventers who are specialists. The Brits have a long history of foxhunting. The Kiwis and Aussies gallop across the fields jumping whatever is in front of them, (wire even), while our guys opt to polish their skills in rings and highly controlled environments. Different outlooks.

            This.




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            • #7
              Why would anyone assume we OUGHT to be number one in eventing? The sport didn't have its origins here, I believe we have fewer English riders, horse owners and horse lovers per capita than most of the nations that are "powers" in horse sports, and we have only one four star event on our home soil.

              I'm guessing the Brits and Aussies and Kiwis who have moved here and set up barns have not come because their sole desire is to participate in the "America is #1!!" love fest, but because here we have a horse economy that will allow them to make a living and to pay for their competitive goals.
              Click here before you buy.

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              • #8
                Agree!

                WE are number one in reining, aren't we?




                Originally posted by deltawave View Post
                Why would anyone assume we OUGHT to be number one in eventing? The sport didn't have its origins here, I believe we have fewer English riders, horse owners and horse lovers per capita than most of the nations that are "powers" in horse sports, and we have only one four star event on our home soil.

                I'm guessing the Brits and Aussies and Kiwis who have moved here and set up barns have not come because their sole desire is to participate in the "America is #1!!" love fest, but because here we have a horse economy that will allow them to make a living and to pay for their competitive goals.
                breeder of Mercury!

                remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

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                • #9
                  No one wants to put any time into anything anymore. It's "I want my cake and I want to eat it. NOW." People want instant fame at the upper levels without having to endure the hard work. And the fox hunting thing is a good point. I learned how to ride xc while hunting in elementary and junior high. I learned how to get behind the motion and how to listen to my horse. I bet not many people in the younger generation do that now.... It's a shame.

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                  • #10
                    more than just hard work

                    I think there are plenty of people who work for it, but, that is not enough; there are too many other factors which, all must come together with perfect timing; it's the old "lightening in a jar" analogy
                    Originally posted by Robby Johnson View Post
                    Because no one wants to work for it.
                    breeder of Mercury!

                    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

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                    • #11
                      Because everything cycles. No country can remain on top forever. The US has been on top before, and will win gold again some time.

                      Just give it time.

                      Also, who says this team won't pull out gold? I think we've got a damn good chance at being competitive, especially considering you never know what is going to happen at the Games.

                      Let's discuss this topic after the Games, not before.

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                      • #12
                        Deltawave, you forget that eventing was created for the cavalry; our cavalry was just as successful, if not more successful, than the Brits until WWII. Going to research and see when "Horse Trials" started as a civilian sport. Have done so, and cannot really find out when the Brits started Horse Trialing. The first civilian 3DE in the US was in 1949, and Badminton started in 1949. According to one website, it was the first Horse Trial.
                        "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
                        Thread killer Extraordinaire

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jealoushe View Post
                          Because the Europeans wanted to be competitive so they influenced the removal of the long format and thus their horses now seem unbeatable. I bet if there were roads and tracks, steeplechase.... North Americans and maybe Kiwis would be back on top.


                          That is a very broad and sweeping statement and not all together accurate.

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                          • #14
                            The United States Cavalry was used to "subdue" the Native American Tribes and secure the land from the Mississippi River to California, among other things.

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                            • #15
                              Deltawave, you forget that eventing was created for the cavalry; our cavalry was just as successful, if not more successful, than the Brits until WWII
                              Yessss, we had a cavalry and a large one, but we had not, as "Americans" been fighting wars on horseback since the 11th century. The people in each generation of course were individuals, but the military tradition of using horses in battle was not precisely the same. I'm certainly no military historian and would lose the war, never mind the battle, immediately if this went to a level beyond the general observation, but seems to me that horses in the military here were a somewhat different critter than the "traditional" soldier's horse (and in fact Officer's horse, yes?) that the fathers of the sport had in mind.

                              Yes, reining is truly an "American" sport but I have no idea if we are the dominant world power any more. It also is such a long way from its (undeniably American) roots as to be unrecognizable.
                              Click here before you buy.

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                              • #16
                                Then vs now. . .

                                So, what's the difference between now and when Tad Coffin, Bruce, Jimmy, Torrrance and the rest of them in that time were riding?

                                Riders, trainers, horses or what? We did pretty well back then it seems.
                                RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

                                "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."

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                                • #17
                                  Long format back then...short format now...
                                  Boss Mare Eventing Blog
                                  https://www.youtube.com/user/jealoushe

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                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Jealoushe View Post
                                    Long format back then...short format now...
                                    In short format, the dressage coefficient overweights dressage.
                                    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
                                    Thread killer Extraordinaire

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                                    • #19
                                      The long format celebrated the military horse. The short, more so, the parade horse.

                                      The long format showed true horsemanship in being able to rate your horse over changing terrain and still have something left for SJ which checked stamina. Dressage was to show tractability and was, rightly so, IMO, the least significant because you aren't going to be able to successfully tackle a tricky CC if you horse isn't adjustable.

                                      Today, if you don't have a decent dressage score, you won't finish near the top. However, if you have an excellent dressage and a poor-to-mediocre CC horse, you will probably end in the hospital if you are lucky.

                                      I loved the long format when dressage was somewhat important but CC was more the key. Back then you could have an average dressage score and a willing, strong, nimble, athletic and, sometimes, lucky horse and you could finish top five. Thoroughbreds were ideal for this format.

                                      I wish they would adjust dressage scores down so that they are only useful in separating the Top Five.

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                                      • #20
                                        When you changes the rules of the game, you change the players as well. One set of rules helps a style of play versus another. The changes in Eventing have been been discussed for much longer then I've been in the game, but it seems a fundamental shift occurred when the sport altered its self to fit in the modern Olympics.

                                        Sports for the Populous tend to be the dominate sport for a country. Look at football, basketball, baseball in our country in relation to the other world countries. It is expected that the US will win a gold in basketball (cough *professionals* cough). Compare the equestrian sports between Europe and the US and there is a vast difference in acceptance and interest. How do you field a top set of riders when the country pays more attention to multimillion dollar ball players who's greatest risk is bad press versus scrapping by riders who literally put their (and their horses) lives on the line every time they "play".

                                        Personally I am not so concerned about USA gold (as a spectator, were I in the games?...), but I do ponder the future of not just Eventing, but of many equestrian sports. We are losing parks, open space, welcoming land owners while at the same time costs in training, horses, equipment, shows climbs to a point where the average participant has too choose to play or not. We could buy our way to a Gold, but lose everything because we lost focus on the base of our sport. The question is not "Why is the US not #1?", the question needs to be How do we grow Eventing in the US?

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