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Loose horse!!!!

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  • Loose horse!!!!

    Is there any way to train the "I'm outta here!" out of a horse after it bucks you off celebrating after an XC fence while schooling with a group of horses?
    http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    I think Reed was the one that would lay down in the area and feed his young horse treats from the ground.
    There was a great video in the snow when he winds up on the ground and his horse does a lap and comes back to him for the treat.

    Maybe somebody else can find the link to the thread (I am search function impaired)
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

    Comment


    • #3
      Of course there is-train it like you'd train any other wanted behavior. You train it when you DON'T need it. Positive reinforcement, a clicker even, if you want to engrain it really quickly. Walk along, hop off without telling him you're going to, ask him to halt, click and treat. Simple. Then do it 100 times, pouring on the praise. Then from trot. I don't know how coordinated you are...if very, do it from canter. I wouldn't dream of doing this any more! I also like Reed's scheme but don't get walked on!
      Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

      Comment


      • #4
        Lunge it first? Give it a good hour's hack before jumping?

        My smarty pants greenies often go hunting. After two hours of trotting they do not feel much like celebrating after jumping a log in the woods.
        Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
        Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

        Comment


        • #5
          If there is please let me know!

          My guy has successfully dumped me twice on cross country at events and both times took off for the hills no matter what I did... Would love to hear some additional ideas on how to deal with this. The getting off and treating is a good thought, I'll have to give it a go!

          Comment


          • #6
            We do need to find that Reed video. It's hilarious..hmm...
            The big man -- my lost prince

            The little brother, now my main man

            Comment


            • #7
              Sadly, now I can't crouch down to put his front boots on without him trying to ask for a snack.


              http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10150473418167622

              It was not just the arena. I would ride him out and when we were done, I would hop off, lay down in the road/parking lot/field, and give him a carrot or other treat.

              Reed

              Comment


              • #8
                The big man -- my lost prince

                The little brother, now my main man

                Comment


                • #9
                  My old AQHA mare would come and "check on me" if I fell off. No treats were ever needed.

                  She could also be a pain to catch (even a bucket of sweet feed wouldn't help - I think she saw it as a game because she loved being ridden and getting away from home). However, if I pretended to limp - like I was hurt - or if I was able to pick up one of her back legs...well then I had her.

                  I really miss that mare. *sigh*
                  The Sempiternal Horse

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Well since I had warmed up for dressage, ridden a test, warmed up for stadium, jumped stadium, hacked 5 minutes to the course, then had ridden out there for 20 minutes I'm not sure that lunging her would have helped

                    Everything else went well and after we chased her down in a golf cart and hacked her back out she was fine.

                    She just got a little excited down her first drop and then celebrated her courage on the landing.
                    Last edited by enjoytheride; Apr. 22, 2012, 10:06 PM.
                    http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                      Sadly, now I can't crouch down to put his front boots on without him trying to ask for a snack.


                      http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10150473418167622

                      It was not just the arena. I would ride him out and when we were done, I would hop off, lay down in the road/parking lot/field, and give him a carrot or other treat.

                      Reed
                      Brilliant!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Love it! Reed, can you come work with mine? : )

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's probably not a horrible idea, but after Horse ran off with me twice after dumping me outside of the arena (once on a trail ride, once on XC), I've taken to keeping a death grip on the reins when I've hit the dirt... it took a couple times after that of me falling and getting dragged for about 5-10' before Horse would realize, "oh damn, she's not letting go" and stop.

                          I fell a few months ago (in the arena this time), and it was the first time in ages where I dropped the reins... and it was the VERY first time, ever, that Horse just stopped, loose, and stood there next to me. (He got ALL kinds of "goodboy!" and pets when I got to me feet, lol-- I try to make a point of praising him if he attempts to stay put when I fall off, since 99.9% of the time it's my own stupidity, not his.)

                          A couple weeks ago, I took a header on a blacktop road when a cyclist spooked us by riding up silently behind. I held onto the reins for half a second but it was clear Horse was NOT stopping this time, so I let go, and off he ran up the road, loose... To my absolute shock and delight, when I stood up and called him, HE CAME TROTTING BACK, right to me.

                          Not that I'd advocate getting dragged on the ground if you happen to become separated from the tack, but it seems to have worked for us.
                          *friend of bar.ka

                          "Evidently, I am an unrepentant b*tch, possible trouble maker, and all around super villian"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cnvh View Post
                            It's probably not a horrible idea, but after Horse ran off with me twice after dumping me outside of the arena (once on a trail ride, once on XC), I've taken to keeping a death grip on the reins when I've hit the dirt... it took a couple times after that of me falling and getting dragged for about 5-10' before Horse would realize, "oh damn, she's not letting go" and stop.
                            Aren't you worried about his mouth when you hang on like that? I was always taught to let go immediately when I fell. Both times my horse dumped me, I held on for about 2 seconds, but let go because he was pulling back and I was concerned about yanking on his mouth.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My most serious injuries have been when holding on after a dumping! It is a tough, split second decision-let go and risk his getting badly hurt or hurting someone else OR hang on and surely get hurt yourself. Now I am so old and wise, I let go. Luckily my present horse always stands, staring at me with a dumbfounded expression...

                              OTOH, one time I got dumped between the start box and the first fence. (yes, very graceful) I held on, I was NOT letting that cow get away. He dragged me back through the stream that had spooked him in the first place, so now I had grass AND water AND mud all over my a$$...I got to my feet, having been looking squarely at his galloping boots galloping next to my face. I dragged him back to the start box, climbed the box, lurched into the tack, gave him a whack or 3 and rode the course (quite well, actually). Later on that day, a man and his 10-12 year old daughter found me at stabling and told me I was their new eventing hero, they'd never seen such guts. Hahaaaa. Brave or stupid, right?
                              Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by cnvh View Post
                                It's probably not a horrible idea, but after Horse ran off with me twice after dumping me outside of the arena (once on a trail ride, once on XC), I've taken to keeping a death grip on the reins when I've hit the dirt...
                                I have had multiple shoulder separations from doing this. Holding on the reins can also bring the horse into your space and inadvertently cause them to land on you. I would not advocate holding on to the reins to teach a horse to not run away unless you were sure you could control the situation. Hence the treat routine with a baby.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Even if you land on your feet, holding onto the reins is generally NOT a good idea. Unless you are riding with long split western reins then you have at least a snowballs chance. You're just going to pull the horse over into you, deadly hooves and all.

                                  Many years ago I had a horse tip me over his shoulder. I stuck the landing and stood there, split rein in hand, facing the horse. At which point he said "HOly $#1T, where did YOU come from, and wheeled and headed home."
                                  There was no holding him.
                                  ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Bring his pony with! After my guy dumped me in an exuberant schooling moment, he ran around whinnying until he located my daughter on her little Welsh pony and made a beeline for them. Stopped next to the pony and put his head down like, "I'm done, thanks!"
                                    TypaGraphics
                                    Graphic Design & Websites
                                    typagraphics.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                                      I have had multiple shoulder separations from doing this. Holding on the reins can also bring the horse into your space and inadvertently cause them to land on you. I would not advocate holding on to the reins to teach a horse to not run away unless you were sure you could control the situation. Hence the treat routine with a baby.
                                      And finally, you also risk pulling the bridle off and making the horse even harder to catch.
                                      If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Heartmare would check on me if I managed to come off. She however was not so nice to the girl who rode her for jumping. If she landed in the dirt my mare was gone, white tail flagging all the way back to the trailer. ( I never said she was perfect or that anyone else appreciated her!) Unfortunately for everyone on the way to the trailer she would stop and untie those she could, undo halters if she could and even unlatch gates in the barn. Standing in front of her waving your arms didn't stop her either, that got you charged at with ears pinned back and sometimes a kick as she passed. Then I trained her with a squeaky ball dog toy. Now this only works if someone is at the arena with you as we found out it annoyed the crap out of her to have the toy squeak every time the rider landed back in the saddle after the jump. Rider comes off, squeak the toy and over she would come to get the treats. It also worked if you put it over the PA system as she would go to the PA box and demand treats.
                                        I've also trained a few to whistles, and wear one on my neck. I come off and I usually have enough breath left in me to blow on that. Also comes in handy when you are hacking out alone and are hurt. Blow enough and usually someone will come find you.
                                        Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
                                        Originally Posted by alicen:
                                        What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

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