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Great. My horse is immature.

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  • Great. My horse is immature.

    So today on the way to the self-care barn, I get a phone call from a fellow boarder informing me that my wonderful, amazing, talented, IDIOT horse had ripped a giant hole in the tarp covering his hay and was munching quite happily. Great. Pipe corral, he can only reach a corner of the bale and we THOUGHT we had blocked him from it. Nope.

    We get there, and sure as sh!t he's got this smug look on his little Arab face and a mouthful of hay. He not only had ripped a huge hole in that tarp (second one, btw) but he also ripped the wind blocking tarp in his effort to get to the hay. So now the trailer has two new tire covers at least. I introduce myself to the lady who called, and I'm not sure if this was an insult or not...

    Lady: "He's so cute. Is he a baby?"
    Me: "No, he's ten. He just doesn't know it apparently."
    Lady: "Oh. (insert eye roll) He acts like a baby."

    This is the third person at the stables who has asked how old he was and was shocked when I said ten. Another woman was much less snarky about it, laughed and said "Wow! At that rate he'll live forever!" as we went prancing down the long side of the arena.

    There are some days he's all mature and such, but others, like yesterday, just *walking* around the outside of the arena (arena was underwater) without looking like a giraffe and snorting/dancing at everything is Just. Too. Hard.

    Of course I love him and cannot entertain the idea of selling him. And honestly his fieriness is my favorite part about him. Most days. Today of course I wanted to choke him with the tarp he chewed up, but I digress.

    Anyone else have an "immature" horse?? I can't be the only one who's double-digit equine didn't get the memo on their birthday!
    runnjump86 Instagram

    Horse Junkies United guest blogger

  • #2
    At least your horse is only 10. Mine is 19 and still exhibits "young" behaivor. I can't keep my halter on the stall because he proceed to throw it around. Also, him and one of his turnout buddies have decided to play catch with his flymask. And yes, there are days when getting him to relax and settle while riding is next to impossible.

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't feel too bad. One gal I know got loads of sympathy and advice at a BN event on managing an "exuberant green 4 yo." She said it was easier to smile and nod than to reveal that he was 17, her trainer's semi-retired Intermediate horse.

      Comment


      • #4
        Haha - my introduction to eventing years ago was when I took my show hunter to Marlborough for an unrecognized event. He cavorted around the dressage ring doing his impression of an adolescent giraffe on speed. A nice lady patted him after the test and said, "Don't worry sweetie, he's just a baby!" He was 14 at the time
        The big guy: Lincoln

        Southern Maryland Equestrian

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        • #5
          When Willpower did his first HT I got this remark from the judge after scoring in the 50s, "Nice young horse, will certainly improve with time." He was 11. Oh well.
          Yes, I ride a pony. No, he would not be ideal for your child. No, he is not a re-sale project...

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          • #6
            Mine is 11, going on 3.

            I often compare him to a bratty, constantly testing, two year child. And at 18hands...that can be, well,quite a handful under saddle. But it keeps me on my toes!

            Sometimes maturity is overrated
            Barn rat for life

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            • #7
              I always say with my arab I am just going to take the 1 off of her age so she will be 6 again and her behavior will fit her age again.

              And, the little 27 yr old arab next to her is even more of a terror. We have stall doors that are latched with double ended snaps on the outside so the horse can't get to them... or so we thought. He will somehow manage to undo them at least once a month and we will find him in the morning snoring it up in the hay stall that he made his for the night. Let alone leaving a halter on him overnight... he will have it off and neatly trampled in the corner of his stall by morning. Every. Single. Time.
              Who say's your best friend has to be human?

              Comment


              • #8
                My horse has the appearance (at least on the ground) of a baby, the gawky, long legs and just general too long limbs sort of look, and he is VERY mouthy and baby-like in personality. I met someone at the barn once, who was tacking up her 5 yo WB and she looks over at my guy and says "Wow, it's so funny that they're both the same age!". My horse is 11. Even the vet mixes up his age!
                Well, at least the quirky ones are more fun, right? ... right?

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                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by wcporter View Post
                  Mine is 11, going on 3.

                  I often compare him to a bratty, constantly testing, two year child. And at 18hands...that can be, well,quite a handful under saddle. But it keeps me on my toes!

                  Sometimes maturity is overrated
                  Bahaha, that's EXACTLY how my horse is. To a T...seriously. Even today we had an argument ummm...discussion...about paying attention to ME on the ground even if there are other more exciting things to look at. Like crows.

                  Originally posted by hightide View Post
                  Well, at least the quirky ones are more fun, right? ... right?
                  Oh definitely!! He is such a stinker, but I love him. Although when we went back out with a roll of fence to put up a section to keep his head and neck INSIDE his corral he had ripped down his Freedom Feeder. Again. And had half of it in his just-cleaned-this-morning water tub.

                  I feel guilty because he was on a huge pasture with cows for so long, and now he's in a 24x24 corral all day except for when I come to ride, turn him out, or hand walk him. Plus side he has neighbors surrounding him, two jolly balls, and a freedom feeder. I have figured out that he's enjoying being back to work. He's most destructive on his days off, so I think its his acting out because well, he can.

                  Or that's what I tell myself so I feel better. Deep down I know he's just a bratty, immature, 10yr old Arab/QH gelding who loves to push my buttons then do something amazing, like the perfect flying change, to convince me not to kill him.

                  Thanks for the replies, I'm so glad I'm not alone!
                  runnjump86 Instagram

                  Horse Junkies United guest blogger

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Arabs are the best. Nuff said.
                    ******************************
                    www.trying2event.blogspot.com
                    www.facebook.com/UltimateStormLARigsby

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Neigh-Neigh View Post
                      Arabs are the best. Nuff said.
                      I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

                      Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wee Dee Trrr View Post
                        When Willpower did his first HT I got this remark from the judge after scoring in the 50s, "Nice young horse, will certainly improve with time." He was 11. Oh well.
                        I've been asked a few times, at the end of a dressage test, whether my mare is green.... I used to get asked that all the time, and she was 10 when I bought her! She's now almost-14 and still has a toddler-ish streak. In fact, I call her my 900 pound toddler

                        I must say, though, that she is wicked fun
                        You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                        1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

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                        • #13
                          Haha sounds exactly like my guy! He just turned 10 too and he acts more like a baby then the 5 year old Oldenburg at our barn! He's a ton of fun and I think everything just works better if you laugh at them. Otherwise I think all of us who are so "blessed" with the quirky ones would have nervous breakdowns

                          He's learned how to open the paddock gate, he can open the treat bin, and when the water bucket in his paddock is empty, he throws it down the giant hill in his paddock. The barn owner loves that...

                          But I love him more than anything and he just wouldn't be the same horse without all of his quirkiness!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I lied.

                            A few months ago, a friend from the barn and I took our boys to a local park to ride on some trails. It was suppose to be a low-key, fun Saturday morning. Unfortunately, my never-steps-out-of-line, perfect-let-you-do-anything-to-him (including tying a kite to his tail, long story) horse had other plans. It was three hours of prancing and snorting and spooking. The whole time pedestrians (who graciously gave us right of way) would "ooh" and "awe" over him, asking if he was a young or a green. Too ashamed, I told them he was a green ex-racehorse and may have uttered the words "five year old" when asked his age. In reality, he's a 17 year old OTTB, whom I've owned for eight years. He's done everything from hunters to western pleasure to barrels to dressage and, currently, might add eventing to the list. Trail riding, though? Trail riding is just too much to ask.
                            "Je suis Pony Owner."

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                            • #15
                              I have a 21-year old TB who still behaves like he's 2. Here are a few examples:

                              Yesterday, I went out to ride him. It took me an hour to catch him even though I had carrots a'plenty and a bucket full of grain. He would let me get close and trot off with a smug expression on his face just before I could grab him. Once I caught him, he got away TWICE, and galloped out into our cross-country field to flirt with the mares who were turned out there.

                              I recently took him in Novice at a local event. He's jumped all the jumps millions of times. We were approaching the last jump, perfect course, and he jerked the reins from my hands. My gloves (partly my fault) were so slippery, I couldn't hold onto the reins. Rather than attempt to jump the last jump with my hands on the buckle, I pulled him off to the side of the course, which resulted in us torpedoing through the crowd. That's right, the oldest horse to compete at Novice level was SO fast and SO uncontrollable, he had to be pulled off course.

                              I feel your pain, but rest assured these qualities will always make them young at heart. I can't tell you how many times people have asked me about my "young" horse only to be shocked when I reveal his true age. He's not slowing down anytime soon, and I'm incredibly thankful for that. Sounds like you've got a smart boy on your hands...enjoy it! :-)

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by CaitlinandTheBay View Post
                                Trail riding, though? Trail riding is just too much to ask.
                                Yeah trail riding is the hardest thing with my 9yo OTTB mare. She's easy to hack by herself (going down the road, who cares about cars trucks and tractors driving by, but a non-moving object might illicit a minor spook. But when we're trail riding with other people, or sometimes even by ourselves and have maybe done something exciting like trot or canter, then walking can become nearly impossible. Luckily she is getting better about when I drop the reins completely she can power walk. But if she isn't walking she is prancing which is actually moving slower than her walk so she gets more behind and them more pissy.... if she would just relax and walk she would not be behind. Goon.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by Wordplay1832 View Post
                                  Yeah trail riding is the hardest thing with my 9yo OTTB mare. She's easy to hack by herself (going down the road, who cares about cars trucks and tractors driving by, but a non-moving object might illicit a minor spook. But when we're trail riding with other people, or sometimes even by ourselves and have maybe done something exciting like trot or canter, then walking can become nearly impossible. Luckily she is getting better about when I drop the reins completely she can power walk. But if she isn't walking she is prancing which is actually moving slower than her walk so she gets more behind and them more pissy.... if she would just relax and walk she would not be behind. Goon.
                                  Isn't it amazing how their prance can be So. Slow. but their walk will pass trotting horses at times?! My guy is awesome on trails, even alone. But walking around the outside of the arena? Nope. Especially when he was on the far end away from the corrals. He'd start his prance/canter in place/bunny buck nonsense, so we'd do circles. And circles. And circles. Walk? Oh! Now I remember! Four strides later...circles...repeat...
                                  runnjump86 Instagram

                                  Horse Junkies United guest blogger

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by runNjump86 View Post
                                    Isn't it amazing how their prance can be So. Slow. but their walk will pass trotting horses at times?! My guy is awesome on trails, even alone. But walking around the outside of the arena? Nope. Especially when he was on the far end away from the corrals. He'd start his prance/canter in place/bunny buck nonsense, so we'd do circles. And circles. And circles. Walk? Oh! Now I remember! Four strides later...circles...repeat...
                                    Oh yeah-I'm pretty sure that I could easily train her to piaffe and passage with that prance.

                                    She gets that syndrome too sometimes when we are working. It is not anything really naughty there though-she just gives me a lovely little trot transition when I am not asking for it-she tries too hard! But that is frustrating when we throw away dressage points because she thinks we need to trot!
                                    She starts anticipating what we might do next so I now have to switch it up on her and make her walk nicely for a while and then go back to doing something else.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      He cavorted around the dressage ring doing his impression of an adolescent giraffe on speed.


                                      Most accurate and funniest description I've heard in awhile!! I've ridden a few of these!
                                      Sir Chancelot- 8 yr TB/ App

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Just to add fuel to the fire...today I get out to the stables around 11am. Bed check/night feeding was at 7:30pm. I am blessed that he takes FOREVER to finish his Freedom Feeder. I drive my truck down his row of corrals so I could unload some items, nearly breaking my neck as I pass him because...WTF...is that HAY?! Someone had thrown him a decent amount of Bermuda hay. He only gets Orchard Grass. In a net, which conveniently still had hay in the bottom. Slammed on brakes, shut off truck, and stand there giving him my "What the HELL did you do?!" look. Neighbor's horse sitter lady speaks up..

                                        "When I got here, he was out of his corral, but he didn't go far. He was down here munching on their hay. Thankfully he's easy to catch, so I put a leadrope around his neck and put him back in."

                                        Grrr...stupid horse...*kicks dirt*

                                        "Well, when I led these two out I heard him banging on his gate. When I turned around he had opened it again and was coming along with us! So I put him back and gave him some Bermuda to keep him busy."

                                        GRRRR... IDIOT HORSE!!! I'm convinced his neighbor helped him escape the first time because she's super lippy and ALWAYS playing with the clip on his gate, but apparently he learned quick.

                                        So. $40 trip to the hardware store later, we have a new super heavy-duty tarp, a section of fencing put up against his corral so he can't stick his stupid neck through and eat said new tarp, new double-ended snaps holding up his hay net, a heavy-duty D clip on his gate handle, and a small section of chain paired with a double-ended snap wrapped around his gate.

                                        I swear if I go back over there tonight and he's loose or has destroyed something else, I'll shoot him. He also went for a 2 hour trail ride today and was rather sweaty when we returned. I wish I could say he was tired, but yeah, right.

                                        Anyone have any luck with toys that keep your horse entertained? He's got 2 jolly balls and a milk jug with rocks in it, but I think he needs a goat or something. Pretty sure he'd try to sacrifice the goat though. They have the lickit things at the hardware store, but I'm 90% certain he'd just rip it down, stand on it, and eat it.
                                        runnjump86 Instagram

                                        Horse Junkies United guest blogger

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