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For those who have crossed over to the Darkside....

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  • For those who have crossed over to the Darkside....

    So there are tons of threads on here that have people like me from hunterland playing with the idea of crossing over into eventing, but most of them seem to be just the planning phases, and I never read anything from afterwards. So former hunter princesses out there, tell me about it!

    How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

    What triggered the shift?

    What are the best things about the change?

    What do you miss from hunterland?

    Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

  • #2
    How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

    17 years.

    What triggered the shift?

    My trainer/girlfriend wanted to go school the local XC course and it brought back lots of fond memories of galloping on our huntfield at home.

    What are the best things about the change?

    More adrenaline.

    What do you miss from hunterland?

    Nothing.

    Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

    Have fun.

    Comment


    • #3
      How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

      Four years.

      What triggered the shift?

      Hunter shows and courses bored me out of my mind and drove me crazy.

      What are the best things about the change?

      Ride times, great community, CROSS COUNTRY, the partnership with my horse, the list is endless.

      What do you miss from hunterland?

      Nothing. Zero. Zilch. Although it was kinda nice to get more than one chance to do it right, but it took away some of the motivation for excellence too.

      Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

      Do it yesterday.
      Life doesn't have perfect footing.

      Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
      We Are Flying Solo

      Comment


      • #4
        How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

        I did 25% eventing, 75% hunter/eq last year. This year I've effectively switched 100% to eventing, with the horse doing double duty as my mom's 2'6 hunter.

        What triggered the shift?

        My draft cross adamantly insists that he does not have a flying lead change (it's in there...somewhere...). I was tired of putting in 8 gorgeous jumps only to drop to the bottom because of a missed change. I took him to a couple BN events on a lark and both the horse and I fell in love

        What are the best things about the change?

        XC!!!! Plus, no one cares about our lead changes. Plus he still gets stared at, but there's more envy and less "ewwww colored draft in the hunter ring???" looks. And did I mention xc? Oh, and the beer.

        What do you miss from hunterland?

        I'm an eq princess. I really wanted to qualify for a local adult medal final last year, and maybe move on to the Ariat medal or something like that. If he just had a change he would make a lovely eq horse *sigh*

        Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

        DO IT!!!!! So much fun!!! Get a vest and get out there for some xc schooling. See how your pony feels about it. Start out small at an unrecognized event. Good luck!

        [/QUOTE]
        The big guy: Lincoln

        Southern Maryland Equestrian

        Comment


        • #5
          How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

          Been trying to convert for 12 years, while I still haven't competed at a recognized event, I would say I actually crossed over about 7 years ago. I moved to an event-y area, starting volunteering and my whole mindset/tastes/etc have switched over to more of a darkside bent. In previous years I managed and taught at a H/J barn.

          What triggered the shift?

          I always wanted to get into eventing, but circumstances just steered me into the H/J world instead. After a back injury and some years away from horses I had the opportunity to get back into horses in the way that I wanted.

          What are the best things about the change?

          Everything. Ride times. The people. The horses. The horsemanship. It being about accomplishing something with your horse, not how fancy they are or how you or the horse look - it's about getting the job done!

          What do you miss from hunterland?

          Nothing. At. All.

          Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

          Go for it! You won't regret it! I went to a local schooling hunter show for some mileage beginning of the season and I was stabled next to a bona fide hunter princess. The glaring difference between our horses, our gear, our tack, our reaction to the rain, etc... made it plain to me that somewhere in the not too distant past I have really converted to being an eventer, even though I've yet to do more than some combined tests and mini trials. I was a bit bemused to stand there and come to the realization, though it was very obvious! I'm aiming for Starter at a recognized event this August
          So yeah, no regrets. Just read the rule book (there aren't any unspoken rules like in hunterland) and go for it!!!
          2016 RRP Makeover Competitor www.EnviousBid.com

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=BreathEasy;5681691]So there are tons of threads on here that have people like me from hunterland playing with the idea of crossing over into eventing, but most of them seem to be just the planning phases, and I never read anything from afterwards. So former hunter princesses out there, tell me about it!

            How long since you've crossed over to eventing?
            I knew when I adopted my PMU foal in 2003 that he would be my future eventer! We have only competed in a handful of trials, life keeps getting in the way, but even just going cross country schooling is a blast!

            What triggered the shift?
            My daughter joined pony club in 2000. In 2003, she was given a former upper level eventer, and we never looked back!

            What are the best things about the change?
            The people....nobody wishing you secretly break a leg on course. They are so friendly. I can stand next to an upper level rider and they speak to you like you are an equal. And the horsemanship..eventers know how to properly care for their horses and don't have to rely on grooms, trainers, etc

            What do you miss from hunterland?
            Nothing. Not the drama. Not the looks from people when I would show without a groom. Not the inside/outside/inside/outside course time after time. Not the expense.

            Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting? Find a good trainer. Prepare to have the time of your life!
            Lori T
            www.calypsofarmeventers.blogspot.com
            www.facebook.com/LoriTankelPhotography
            www.facebook.com/LTEquine for product updates on the lines I rep

            Comment


            • #7
              How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

              More than 30 years

              What triggered the shift?

              I decided there had to be more to riding than eight fences in a ring.

              What are the best things about the change?

              The people, the horses, the courses, the level of horsemanship and just about everything else.

              What do you miss from hunterland?

              Not a thing!

              Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

              Put on your big girl pants and DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

                11 years...maybe more like 9 if you go from when I moved so that I could event more than just 2 or 3 times a year!

                What triggered the shift?

                It was totally by accident as I was CERTAIN for a long time that I was too chicken to jump things that didn't fall down and my little appy was too chicken to go xc. My dad actually LOVED the sport and thought I should do it for years prior to my first event. Anyway, due to some issues that were out of my hands, I was unable to show at all for a long time, and I always loved showing. I had moved to a new barn, and some of my fellow boarders were planning on attending a local unrecognized event (one of only TWO events in the Richmond, VA area at the time). They invited me along, and so, since I was craving a show, I said what the hell. My horse and I were solid in the 3' divisions in the h/j land, but I picked the itty bitty level for comfort. Finished xc and never looked back. We both LOVED it (and the horse, who I accused of being too chicken, later became a fabulous lower level packer).

                What are the best things about the change?

                ummm....everything. Cross country, obviously, I am a far, far better rider and became one in short order (I would hope, had I stayed in the h/j land for 11 more years I would still be better, but I do think I am just a much more well rounded rider now). One of my favorite differences is START TIMES. No showing up at 8, thinking you're division should start around 9, to find out there are 50 ponies in the division before you and not getting into the ring until 2...or, being certain your division won't start until 2, and showing up at 12 to find out that there is one more pair in YOUR class!

                What do you miss from hunterland?

                Nothing. Really. The closest common denominator is hunter judging and dressage judging...both can make you scratch your head, especially at the local levels in the hunters.

                Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

                GET GOOD HELP. It's pretty easy to have a little fun at BN and lower, and probably even Novice if you are a pretty solid rider, but, especially when talking about xc, you REALLY need good help to teach you the ins and outs of proper xc riding. My biggest pet peeve with eventers is the DIY mentality...and I think a lot of people end up wasting a lot of time and money, and scaring themselves and their horses because they think they can just do it alone. Yes. There are a lot of reasons why you've got to be self sufficient, but you can't be that until you know what the hell you're doing! So, find a good event coach and take some lessons.

                Also, huge crest releases and big, over exaggerated moves over the tops of fences (I know that's not the case of EVERY h/j rider...but it is way too common) are NOT a good idea in eventing...a sure way to eat it.

                Last, READ THE RULE BOOK!!!
                Amanda

                Comment


                • #9
                  I moved over from the hunters 18 years ago at the ripe old age of 12.
                  I was persuaded to do this little unreconized event by some of my friends. I also did a eventing clinic with Jim Graham. Which was an adventure on my little hunter, she did not like the water or being out of the arena at all. The next year I started eventing on a different horse and I never looked back. Well, I did do about two years of hunters when my upper level prospect didn't think eventing was really his thing.
                  The think that I like about eventing the most is the people. They definatly are some of the most helpful people around. You can ask how their x-country round went and they will tell you where the footing is getting deep, how some of the combinations are riding and also tell you just to relax and have fun! They will also lend you their boots, x-country vest, spare bridle, bits, crops, pretty much anything if you forgot it or something breaks right before your ride.
                  I don't really miss hunterland, however, it really helped me calm down my upper body. The sitting around for hours at a time waiting to do a round really isn't my thing.
                  Some advice know the rules. If you don't know the rules you can always ask an eventer, they know them pretty well. Have fun and if you want get a trainer to help you out you can. You also can go at this alone, especially at the lower levels, but I would go to a clinic to get confidence and learn the basics of a x-country course. I didn't have a trainer then or now, just a couple of friends that know a heck of a lot more than I do about horses and eventing will help me out if I ask for it. Good luck and go eventing!
                  http://i405.photobucket.com/albums/p...r/DSC_1428.jpg

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How long since you've crossed over to eventing?

                    Let's call it two years for easy math

                    What triggered the shift?

                    To be honest, I realized I would never be able to afford a 'winning' hunter. I was frustrated with working so hard and my horse being so good, but he didn't float or pull his knees up to his eyeballs so we had no hope in the show ring. I also wanted to get away from the low level jumpers, since I saw a lot of scary riding. I enjoyed doing dressage shows, jumping, and hunter paces, so I decided that I might as well enjoy all three at the same time. It also helps that my mother forbade me from doing eventing when I was little, so what did she think I was going to do when I grew up?

                    What are the best things about the change?

                    Ride times! Seriously, I enjoy the feeling of community, the objective nature of most of the scoring, and the fact no one cares what brand breeches I'm wearing. But they might be curious about the brand of underwear if I come off in the water.

                    What do you miss from hunterland?

                    Equitation rounds. Part of me misses turning my horse out to the absolute nines and riding around a challenging course while making it look easy. I have too much to work on to focus on my stadium as much, and I know my riding has slipped a bit because of it. I'm not a specialist anymore.

                    Whats your best bit of advice for those of us thinking of converting?

                    Go out in the open and jump something. If a gallop out in the open makes your heart beat faster in a good way, then you're on the right path! If the idea of a gallop in the woods makes your blood run cold, it might not be the best fit. It's a tough sport, more physically demanding than a hunter show on most days, you see more tumbles, and you only get one shot for a placing. You've got to love it to stick with it.
                    http://thoughtfulequestrian.blogspot.com - My Ventures Into Eventing

                    Comment

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