• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

UPDATE: "Masters" of eventing. Last post: Torri's email.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • UPDATE: "Masters" of eventing. Last post: Torri's email.

    What if it were possible to change the attitude of having to move up to one of having achieved something significant? One emphasizing accomplishment rather than advancement? USDF awards bronze, silver and gold medals for riders who have succeeded at various levels. Consider something like that in eventing--something that USEA could make a big deal out of: mastering the levels.
    Bear with me, please.

    Imagine meeting the qualification criteria for the next level and receiving a certificate, pin and your name (or horse’s) listed online and in the magazine? Are those just superficial things? Well, in a way, they are—but not if they aren’t treated that way. They can also be symbolic things. Symbols which not only stand for achievement, but also are a reminder of the training and development of horse and rider that is supposed to be at the heart of the sport and its progressive nature. Out there in the real world, symbols are used all the time to subtly remind people of what is important and why. And once they and what they stand for become embedded in the culture, the symbols are no longer hokey. They are valued.

    Mastering training level should be more important than competing at Preliminary. I’m sure everyone agrees with that in principle. How can it be made not just agreeable, but even desirable?

    Right now, it’s all about the future, not the past. The pressure is to get on with it, instead of master it. And that’s why many--including pros--resist tougher qualifying criteria and also, perhaps, why some move up too soon. With young riders it’s peer pressure and just the atmosphere of the sport. You are viewed with increasing respect and attention the higher up you go. With pros, it can also be financial pressure: the higher the level of horse, the more its worth. Either way, there are no rewards for staying where you are and doing it really, really well.

    But what if there were a way to emphasize mastery such that moving up weren’t the only satisfaction out there? What if mastery could be recognized in such a way that not only riders, but also owners and buyers could recognize even the financial value of a horse that has mastered its level? Most event horse buyers are NOT upper level riders. Indeed, upper level horses often sell to lower level riders because by getting to the upper levels it is assumed that they’ve “proven” that the lower levels are well within them. And yet we know full well that that isn’t necessarily true. Competing at higher levels often depends more on who is doing the riding than on what the horse has truly mastered.

    So… what if horses didn’t HAVE to be “proven” by moving up? What if staying at a level and competing as a master in that level had significance by itself? What if there evolved special divisions, awards or championships for horses or riders in their “master class”: those that have received their bronze (say, Novice level), silver (Training), gold (Prelim), platinum (Intermediate) or titanium (Advanced) medals? [I’m not fond of taking it beyond gold, but this is just an example.) Indeed, what if being a master at your current level became more prestigious than being just a competitor at the next level? And what if some master divisions included tougher conditions to not only challenge the masters, but also to provide them with a “half step” into the next level?

    As the owner of an upper level horse whose neck is put on the line every time he competes, I can tell you quite honestly that I would have been just as happy—and maybe even happier—if he had achieved fame as a master of a lower level, rather than a competitor at a higher one. Indeed, I could even dream about breeding ponies who would become known for their abilities to master the sport—NOT for the ability to compete at a high level. Can anyone see what I mean by how mastery actually takes the pressure OFF, how it could lead to longer careers; happier, sounder horses; and just as much a feeling of accomplishment as the current emphasis on getting to higher levels?

    I’d be happy as a clam to have ponies competing successfully at Training and Preliminary forever, drawing attention to themselves by being just as masterful over the country as horses—rather than by literally risking their necks to promote my breeding program. And I think that just as with ponies, the parents of younger riders might also be equally proud of their child’s mastery, rather than their child’s willingness to take on uncertainty and risk—and for what? With a master class, the “for what” is a GOOD thing: for the honor of being recognized as having mastered something. And, yes, once that honor has worn thin, then maybe it is time to move on (for the pair or for the horse with a rider already a master at the next level, or a rider with a horse already a master at the next level—see how a SAFER thought process might evolve by inserting the term "mastery" into the sport's lexicon?).

    So I say let’s do something that encourages people to savor their accomplishments and take pride in what has been achieved, rather than what is yet to be. Kinda like stopping to smell the roses along the way. After all, maybe you’ll find a particularly fragrant patch and decide to stay there forever. If you don’t stop and take a good whiff, how will you ever really know?
    Last edited by pwynnnorman; Apr. 4, 2008, 11:47 AM. Reason: change title, again
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

  • #2
    Um...pwynn--have you been following the hoo hah over the proposed "performance standards" in dressage over the months since the end of November?

    Check out various threads on dressage forum.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Yes, I have and I was PRAYING that no one woudl take this off track into that direction!

      Look, ya think maybe stricter qualifying criteria might just be a bit more palatable if staying where you are and being acknowleged for what you've achieved had as much significance as moving up?

      Please don't take discussion on COTH as representative of entire groups of people. I have friends who work hard to achieve their bronze, silver or gold with no concern for the stuff being argued. Why? Because that stuff has to do with moving up, it does NOT emphasize being as good as you can be at the level you are at.

      Please don't let this stray! I'd rather it got no attention at all than it missed the central point. The details are irrelevant. I'm not proposing this as the only way to change attitudes, just an example of a potential one--and maybe also the need to think about one.
      Sportponies Unlimited
      Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

      Comment


      • #4
        Isn't there something similar to this already in place ... it's just not given a lot of recognition?


        Under the Rider's Awards you find:

        Medallion Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Novice level H.T.s
        Blue Ribbon Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Training level H.T.s
        Bronze Medal Club -- 1st -5th place at 3 Prelim H.T.s, Events and *
        Silver Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Intermediate H.T.s, Events, and **
        Gold Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Advanced H.T.s, Events, *** and ****

        All three competitions at a given level must take place in the same calendar year and placings must be earned by the same horse/rider PAIR. Riders are responsible for applying for these awards.

        Could these be made more prestigious? My daughter got her "Silver" back in '91, and we were certainly proud of her and her horse's accomplishment even though the award itself was only a certificate. Horse/rider pairs earning these awards also used to be printed in the USEA magazine ... don't know if that's the case anymore or not.
        Sharon
        Larapinta Sport Horses
        Arab Eventers

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thank you, Sharon. That's great to know about--and why I posted this rather than just sending in as a suggestion. And, yes, that's what I mean: more prestige, more recognition, more respect for doing well at the level you are at, rather than for just "doing" the next (level). It's not something that would change the attitude or culture behind moving up immediately, but gradually and with some loving attention, it might.

          Or maybe something else. I'm just thinking that changing out of fear (of what could happen/continue to happen if something isn't done) is probably never, by itself, the kind of change anyone is happy with. Change to return to or support an ideal (as well as prevent tragedy) is a lot more positive.
          Sportponies Unlimited
          Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

          Comment


          • #6
            How about a nice big ribbon with the certificate?

            As a lower-level rider struggling for mastery (no intentions to do ULs), I would love for these awards to get more attention/prestige.

            Originally posted by larapintavian View Post
            Isn't there something similar to this already in place ... it's just not given a lot of recognition?


            Under the Rider's Awards you find:

            Medallion Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Novice level H.T.s
            Blue Ribbon Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Training level H.T.s
            Bronze Medal Club -- 1st -5th place at 3 Prelim H.T.s, Events and *
            Silver Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Intermediate H.T.s, Events, and **
            Gold Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Advanced H.T.s, Events, *** and ****

            All three competitions at a given level must take place in the same calendar year and placings must be earned by the same horse/rider PAIR. Riders are responsible for applying for these awards.

            Could these be made more prestigious? My daughter got her "Silver" back in '91, and we were certainly proud of her and her horse's accomplishment even though the award itself was only a certificate. Horse/rider pairs earning these awards also used to be printed in the USEA magazine ... don't know if that's the case anymore or not.
            SportHorseRiders.com
            Taco Blog
            *T3DE 2010 Pact*

            Comment


            • #7
              It is a great idea. I don't think the current system applies however. Placings have NOTHING to do with mastery. I think I won one of those back in the 1990's, but it had nothing to do with my ability and everything to do with the great horse I rode. I am a better rider and horseman today, but couldn't string together 3 good ribbons to save my life.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by pwynnnorman View Post
                What if it were possible to change the attitude of having to move up to one of having achieved something significant? One emphasizing accomplishment rather than advancement? USDF awards bronze, silver and gold medals for riders who have succeeded at various levels. Consider something like that in eventing--something that USEA could make a big deal out of: mastering the levels.
                Bear with me, please.

                Imagine meeting the qualification criteria for the next level and receiving a certificate, pin and your name (or horse’s) listed online and in the magazine? Are those just superficial things? Well, in a way, they are—but not if they aren’t treated that way. They can also be symbolic things. Symbols which not only stand for achievement, but also are a reminder of the training and development of horse and rider that is supposed to be at the heart of the sport and its progressive nature. Out there in the real world, symbols are used all the time to subtly remind people of what is important and why. And once they and what they stand for become embedded in the culture, the symbols are no longer hokey. They are valued.

                Mastering training level should be more important than competing at Preliminary. I’m sure everyone agrees with that in principle. How can it be made not just agreeable, but even desirable?

                Right now, it’s all about the future, not the past. The pressure is to get on with it, instead of master it. And that’s why many--including pros--resist tougher qualifying criteria and also, perhaps, why some move up too soon. With young riders it’s peer pressure and just the atmosphere of the sport. You are viewed with increasing respect and attention the higher up you go. With pros, it can also be financial pressure: the higher the level of horse, the more its worth. Either way, there are no rewards for staying where you are and doing it really, really well.

                But what if there were a way to emphasize mastery such that moving up weren’t the only satisfaction out there? What if mastery could be recognized in such a way that not only riders, but also owners and buyers could recognize even the financial value of a horse that has mastered its level? Most event horse buyers are NOT upper level riders. Indeed, upper level horses often sell to lower level riders because by getting to the upper levels it is assumed that they’ve “proven” that the lower levels are well within them. And yet we know full well that that isn’t necessarily true. Competing at higher levels often depends more on who is doing the riding than on what the horse has truly mastered.

                So… what if horses didn’t HAVE to be “proven” by moving up? What if staying at a level and competing as a master in that level had significance by itself? What if there evolved special divisions, awards or championships for horses or riders in their “master class”: those that have received their bronze (say, Novice level), silver (Training), gold (Prelim), platinum (Intermediate) or titanium (Advanced) medals? [I’m not fond of taking it beyond gold, but this is just an example.) Indeed, what if being a master at your current level became more prestigious than being just a competitor at the next level? And what if some master divisions included tougher conditions to not only challenge the masters, but also to provide them with a “half step” into the next level?

                As the owner of an upper level horse whose neck is put on the line every time he competes, I can tell you quite honestly that I would have been just as happy—and maybe even happier—if he had achieved fame as a master of a lower level, rather than a competitor at a higher one. Indeed, I could even dream about breeding ponies who would become known for their abilities to master the sport—NOT for the ability to compete at a high level. Can anyone see what I mean by how mastery actually takes the pressure OFF, how it could lead to longer careers; happier, sounder horses; and just as much a feeling of accomplishment as the current emphasis on getting to higher levels?

                I’d be happy as a clam to have ponies competing successfully at Training and Preliminary forever, drawing attention to themselves by being just as masterful over the country as horses—rather than by literally risking their necks to promote my breeding program. And I think that just as with ponies, the parents of younger riders might also be equally proud of their child’s mastery, rather than their child’s willingness to take on uncertainty and risk—and for what? With a master class, the “for what” is a GOOD thing: for the honor of being recognized as having mastered something. And, yes, once that honor has worn thin, then maybe it is time to move on (for the pair or for the horse with a rider already a master at the next level, or a rider with a horse already a master at the next level—see how a SAFER thought process might evolve by inserting the term "mastery" into the sport's lexicon?).

                So I say let’s do something that encourages people to savor their accomplishments and take pride in what has been achieved, rather than what is yet to be. Kinda like stopping to smell the roses along the way. After all, maybe you’ll find a particularly fragrant patch and decide to stay there forever. If you don’t stop and take a good whiff, how will you ever really know?
                I read this as the writer telling me she'd favor quality over quantity any day, any time, any year...
                ~ it no longer matters what level I do, as long as I am doing it..~ with many thanks, to Elizabeth Callahan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Be careful what you wish for.

                  As a former dressage sales barn rider and instructor I think that is the LAST sport you'd want to emulate in terms of advancing. There are huge commercial operations in the US built entirely on the premise the 2nd level is an unattainable goal. "Riders" spend hours debating vaguely mystical concepts that end in -ness and have elevated the ability to actually ride your damn horse in a straight line then a bendy one then a straight one to the level of acheiving nirvana and being sucked into the cosmos in a poof of white light.

                  There is little in 4th level that the average amateur can't conquer with a competent instructor, their books confiscated and their mouths taped shut.

                  Excuse me, I have to go and take my blood pressure medication now.

                  signed silver "if you can do a shoulder-in you can do a half pass" 2

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As the owner and rider of a horse who is physically limited to the lower levels, I would love if they offered recognition for mastery of different stages... I do also compete in dressage shows and those Medals are part of my personal goals. I'll admit, I'm a sucker for year-end awards and such, but to me it's more than just collecting ribbons, it's having a specific level/title in mind and doing my best to earn it. (Yes, I do set goals outside of those awards, but it is nice to get that extra recognition, and if we're eligible, why not?)

                    Maybe they could revamp the current USEA "Rider Awards" to make them similar to the dressage awards? ie, it's not the placing that counts, but quality and consistency: scores of __ percent, from __ different showgrounds, under __ different judges. I have been steering well clear of the other threads disputing the performance standards so I don't really want to get into it here... But why not something like that? Achieving a certain score in dressage with a minimum of added penalties, rather than just placing well, and being able to repeat the performance a number of times over different courses.
                    Member of the Standardbreds with Saddles Clique!
                    They're not just for racing!
                    nowthatsatrot.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [quote=larapintavian;3086278]Isn't there something similar to this already in place ... it's just not given a lot of recognition?


                      Under the Rider's Awards you find:

                      Medallion Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Novice level H.T.s
                      Blue Ribbon Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Training level H.T.s
                      Bronze Medal Club -- 1st -5th place at 3 Prelim H.T.s, Events and *
                      Silver Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Intermediate H.T.s, Events, and **
                      Gold Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Advanced H.T.s, Events, *** and ****

                      As far as I know they are non-existant - my son should have gotten his Blue ribbon club and a bronze medal last year. . .
                      www.amiddle-agedmadwomantakesthereins.blogspot.com

                      www.pegasusridge.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Did he apply for them? That's the first major flaw in the recognition. USEA is saying we will give you a certificate if you track your placings and let us know that you have achieved this award rather than saying we think your achievements as a rider are important and we will monitor our database of event placings and recognize your accomplishments.

                        They used to (may still) offer a certificate for volunteering. It was only available to members who sent in a list of three events at which they had volunteered. As a member, I see volunteering as an obligation of membership. I always thought it would be more useful if USEA made volunteer certificates available to organizers to distribute to non-member volunteers as an acknowledgement that we (USEA and its members) can't do this alone.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by Gry2Yng View Post
                          It is a great idea. I don't think the current system applies however. Placings have NOTHING to do with mastery. I think I won one of those back in the 1990's, but it had nothing to do with my ability and everything to do with the great horse I rode. I am a better rider and horseman today, but couldn't string together 3 good ribbons to save my life.
                          That's what I was thinking, too. Just as qualifying criteria have nothing to do with placings, neither should any mastery concept. I think it'd be better, in fact, for mastery to be based on qualifying for the next level because then that would help the concept reinforce the idea that you don't have to move up, even if you've qualified to do so. You can stay where you are and enjoy being a master at that level (with all the perks, attention and respect -- or whatever other incentives -- your achievement has earned), at least for a while.

                          As a former dressage sales barn rider and instructor I think that is the LAST sport you'd want to emulate in terms of advancing. There are huge commercial operations in the US built entirely on the premise the 2nd level is an unattainable goal. "Riders" spend hours debating vaguely mystical concepts that end in -ness and have elevated the ability to actually ride your damn horse in a straight line then a bendy one then a straight one to the level of acheiving nirvana and being sucked into the cosmos in a poof of white light.
                          Ah, but dressage doesn't have the safety issue we do. If things were to evolve such that the same occurred in eventing, as least riders in barns like that would be SAFE. Better to fiddle around forever at a safe level than fly through more dangerous ones.

                          But I can't imagine that happening. If you master your level, compete against other masters, become a "master of masters," so-to-speak, eventually, you'll either get bored and move up or sell your master horse and start again with another...or just have a great time being a perpetual master. The nice thing about the sport is that the courses are always different. You're never guarenteed a win...although, I guess if it got THAT bad, masters could receive a handicap of some kind, like adding an automatic 10 points to their scores. But I can't see it becoming like that.
                          Sportponies Unlimited
                          Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=pegasusmom;3087221]
                            Originally posted by larapintavian View Post
                            Isn't there something similar to this already in place ... it's just not given a lot of recognition?


                            Under the Rider's Awards you find:

                            Medallion Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Novice level H.T.s
                            Blue Ribbon Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Training level H.T.s
                            Bronze Medal Club -- 1st -5th place at 3 Prelim H.T.s, Events and *
                            Silver Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Intermediate H.T.s, Events, and **
                            Gold Medal Club -- 1st - 5th place at 3 Advanced H.T.s, Events, *** and ****

                            As far as I know they are non-existant - my son should have gotten his Blue ribbon club and a bronze medal last year. . .
                            I have 2 Medallion club's, one for Spot and one for Cody. But you have to keep up with the paperwork and send it to the USEA to be recognized.

                            Cody

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think it's a great idea.

                              I never really thought of it, but many dressage trainers do advertise what medals they have acheived, whereas I can't recall an event instructor mentioning which of these "clubs" they are in. Seems event trainers tend to note what event(s) they have done well at.

                              Personally- I'd like to do away with the term "club" and completely rename the T award.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Jimmy Wofford's Criteria

                                Jimmy put together a great set of criteria in a PH article. You can review it on his website.


                                http://special.equisearch.com/downlo...tingSystem.pdf

                                I would rather be known as a solid 7 on Jimmy's scale than have a "silver medal" from the USEA.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Great Post!

                                  A change of mentality is what is really needed in our sport and I couldn't agree more with a fresh look at acknowleding those who are doing a superior job at their current level. This is why I started the earlier thread re: sportsmanship and moving up without some sort of competitive compitence at a current level.

                                  The mentality of mastering a level brings out the "sport" in our sport. If you are striving to achieve good scores/placings you "will" eventually receive them. And if you're not, why would (or rather "should") you move up?

                                  More importantly, I think humans are inately challenging of any "requirements" that may be imposed on them by a person/sport/organization, etc. We are Americans and we love our freedom. National Qualifying Scores (which I personally am in favor of and wouldn't mind seeing them be more tough) are shunned by many competitors. Maybe "some" of these same competitors, if given a more positive outlet to work for honorable awards before moving up, would be more likely to alter their phyche of "moving up" as a goal to strive for and be driven to stay where they are a bit longer in pursuit of these awards. And again, these award would need some good ad campaigns and PR to really establish themselves as a worthy goal.

                                  I feel this would do BOTH our sport and the safety of it a great deal of good!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I think it's a great idea. Never even heard of the existing awards, and "club" sounds childish to me, so let's renew it with some better words and put it out there. Personally, I love goals, and I am all about mastering a level before moving up. Kind of nice to get a public pat on the back for it.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Gry2Yng View Post
                                      It is a great idea. I don't think the current system applies however. Placings have NOTHING to do with mastery. I think I won one of those back in the 1990's, but it had nothing to do with my ability and everything to do with the great horse I rode. I am a better rider and horseman today, but couldn't string together 3 good ribbons to save my life.
                                      In our case, as my daughter has continued to get better over the years with each horse, she has also placed better, more consistently, and earlier in each horse's career. We just can't afford to get to 3 same-level competitions very often in the same CALENDAR year. For instance, she has had her current young horse out 9 times .... won both of this YEH-4s, 5,2 & 1 in his three Novices, and WON 3 out of his 4 Training levels (two of them with a 10-point lead) ..... but the Training and Novice competition 'sets' were in 2 different CALENDAR years each, even though within a 12 month period, so she was not eligible to apply for either the 'Medallion' or the 'Blue Ribbon' awards with this horse.

                                      If I'm not mistaken, the USDF scores for each level don't have to be earned within the same calendar year.

                                      [QUOTE=pegasusmom;3087221]
                                      Originally posted by larapintavian View Post
                                      .....As far as I know they are non-existant - my son should have gotten his Blue ribbon club and a bronze medal last year. . .
                                      That IS part of the problem ... ther RIDER must keep track and make application for these awards, USEA doesn't track it for them. Congratulations to your son. Check out the application (I found it on the USEA site ... just searched 'rider's awards') and see if he can still apply or if there is a time limit.

                                      Originally posted by metzengerstein
                                      The USPC Standards of Proficiency might be worth a look, too.
                                      Agree with this one too ... could offer some ideas

                                      Originally posted by throwurheart View Post
                                      I think it's a great idea. Never even heard of the existing awards, and "club" sounds childish to me, so let's renew it with some better words ......
                                      Definitely agree with THIS too. The USDF 'Bronze Medal' even sounds so much better than USEA 'Bronze Medal Club'.
                                      Sharon
                                      Larapinta Sport Horses
                                      Arab Eventers

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        larapintavian,
                                        I did not mean to imply that improvement in placing is not a measure of improving skill, only that placing well does not always coincide with mastery. In our sport, it can be the winner, who rides hell bent for leather and shows scarcely a trace of mastery and only a lack of good judgement. The winner can also be a master of the level.
                                        Gry

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X