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How do you comfort yourself on the days

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  • How do you comfort yourself on the days

    you would take $5 for your horse? Or maybe PAY someone $5 to take your horse?!

  • #2
    Ha ha!!!

    Luckily, I really don't have those days.... Fleckers is AWESOME!

    But sorry.. that's not what you wanted to hear...

    Just know that it will get better the next day... then go have a peppermint shake or funfetti cupcakes ;P

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    • #3
      Brandy old fashioned. Sugar cube, dash of bitters, cracked ice, and brandy.

      Other than that I think about the highlights. Days that just stood out as just amazing, the days where you wouldn't take any price for your horse, and think that there will be more days like that. These days are the price you pay for those days.

      Easier to do after step one.
      http://thoughtfulequestrian.blogspot.com - My Ventures Into Eventing

      Comment


      • #4
        If you figure it out, let me know. I am still willing to take a Starbucks gift card for mine. Unfortunately no one at the barn will take me up on it. For some reason, they don't think I'm serious.

        At least he's cute and since he was released from solitary confinement (ligament injury), his ground manners have become almost civilized again! Of course, he will become sound just in time for his anhydrosis to flare up. Grumble. And then right after we get that under control, monsoon season will begin here in the low country and his feet will fall off.

        I should be able to ride him again somewhere around mid-September. . .

        What can I say, I love my beast.
        When life gives you lemons. . .say &%^# you lemons! And throw those lemons back in life's face so that it will be afraid of you and won't try that crap again!

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        • #5
          Beer and a cheeseburger.

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          • #6
            I make him stand on the curb with a sign around his neck that says "Free to bad home".

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            • #7
              We all ave those days... especially those of us with chestnut mares!!!!

              Go back and read those update posts that you put up when things really started to come together for you guys. It sounds like you have made a TON of progress recently: 10 leaps forward one baby step back?
              "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant

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              • #8
                That bad huh? Luckily they invented tomorrows!
                "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork

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                • #9
                  Whine, go home, drink tea, sleep, go back and try again the next day

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wish I got to ride enough that I had crappy rides! I think some days my horse would trade me for a box of sugar cubes. I Defintely do not devote enough time to him. Poor boy, this winter has been rough. Love him, hope he still loves me!
                    proud momma of an evil grey QH/Arab who can jump the moon... and he stole my heart

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                    • #11
                      I used to call my husband after dressage and swear I was gonna sell my old horse (she HATED dressage). Then after xc I'd call him and say "Well, I'll give her a few more months". She ended up going Intermediate....

                      Fortunately my little chestnut TB mare isn't quite that high/low, but occassionally there are moments. Just remember the good parts and keep your eye on your goals!

                      Jennifer
                      Third Charm Event Team

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                      • #12
                        Whine, drink wine, remember the moments that this has happened in the past with this or other horses and the moments when you wouldn't have sold him for any price because they were so perfect.
                        OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!

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                        • #13
                          Oh my! $5?

                          I'd take a bent quarter for one of them (the one that knocked me down AGAIN and got loose last night in 8 degree windchill and ran ALL over the entire neighborhood (and I mean did NOT miss a lawn or septic tank within a one mile radius) with a chainshank dragging off his nose....I caught mounted on Rugby -- trying to stay on him bareback with a neck hood and no mane to grab while rearing and dancing all over -- then the Terrorists LOCKED the truck while it was running and would not let the neighbor without a jacket stick his arm in the truck and unlock the door thru the open window...someone PLEASE tell me I have a buyer coming to get THAT ONE.
                          Proud & Permanent Student Of The Long Road
                          Read me: EN (http://eventingnation.com/author/annemarch/) and HJU (http://horsejunkiesunited.com/author/holly-covey/)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I whine. alot. then I suck up and get over it. Back when I was in high school my first horse after riding ponies was an OTTB- bad idea. We went on the suggestion of my then trainer, but soon decided i wanted to switch trainers...I quickly found out neither pony or I handled pressure well together and I couldn't ride my way out f a wet paper bag...after many tearful rides home I finally decided to sell him (im not suggesting thats what you should do)

                            I also had another young horse who would often bring our tears of frustration (different from above when I was just scared) with that horse I just had to focus on the good. Eventually things got alot better between us and when she finally moved back to her owner (she was a free lease) I realized how much I liked her. I still find myself missing her a bit a year later, even though I love my current horse and he is much more athletic etc...

                            Sorry Im rambling. But just try to focus on the good rides, when they suck theres no reason not to cry all the way home if it makes you feel better, eat some chocolate and remember that tomorrow is a new day and look forward to being able to conquer whatever it was you couldnt yesterday. And always try to remember how lucky you are to be able to have these amazing animals in your life!
                            Good Luck, you'll get through it!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Comfort food. Margaritas. The ear of a sympathetic friend. Early to bed. Tomorrow is another day.

                              Wash, rinse, repeat.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by goobs View Post
                                I make him stand on the curb with a sign around his neck that says "Free to bad home".
                                LMAO!!!!
                                that sounds like something I would have responded with.

                                well, first I look at the stars. This week we had a terrible moon.
                                problem solved. blame it on the cosmos.


                                If the problems continue I would call one of the coaches in the area and ride with a mediator.
                                http://kaboomeventing.com/
                                http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
                                Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by scubed View Post
                                  Whine, drink wine, remember the moments that this has happened in the past with this or other horses and the moments when you wouldn't have sold him for any price because they were so perfect.

                                  Scubed has the answer.

                                  We've all been there (I think: at least I have).

                                  Standing joke in my barn is that all of my horses are for sale. Price changes daily. It has gotten as low a $1.50 in plug nickels, but there are other days when 6 figures wouldn't be enough. Seven figures is ALWAYS enough!
                                  They don't call me frugal for nothing.
                                  Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    WOW, I did not expect this many responses to my whiny little post! Thank you, guys!

                                    It was just a bad day. The topic of hock injections has just come up, and then the next day he was, well, a pr*ck. He was amped up from the time I got him down to the barn, pushed me against the wall in the grooming stall and took off (to the stallion's pasture, of course) while I am getting untangled from a cross tie.. took off at a dead sprint in Neos, on ice, fell several times (can't believe the horse didn't) FINALLY caught him, and you can imagine how our ride went.

                                    I think what makes this process so frustrating for me sometimes is that I am a greenie teaching a greenie. I have great people on my side guiding me through the process, but I was deceived into buying a horse I really wasn't prepared for, and didn't know I wasn't prepared for, because the people I trusted told me he was perfect for me. Dumb, dumb, dumb. Even so, I CAN do this, and I WILL do this, I made a commitment to this animal and I'm seeing it through. I am also constantly told that we are much further along than I give myself credit for, and that I'm too critical and hard on myself, and can't expect to do something perfectly, especially when I'm just learning something new for the first time. Well.. that is just my nature. I've always been a perfectionist, but I also make sure that I get something done correctly the first time.

                                    I got to a point in our ride where I pulled him up and started to cry, before realizing that I would never live it down if anyone walked into the ring, and, that I was not getting anywhere by being a baby. Still in tears, I got him working again, and when he lifted his back and moved under himself, I was patting him, sobbing "GoooOooOooOOddd BOooooYYYY,...sob sob sob". Dear god, it must have been hysterical to see.

                                    Anyway, the next day, my lessee had a lesson, and I got a text from my trainer saying that she had to get on him for a "tune up", apparently he was being a real a$$hole. SO, at least, knowing that he gave attitude to my trainer as well, and his lessee, I don't feel quite so useless, or that it was just *my* fault. For the record, this behavior is absolutely not pain related, everyone on the farm has been rather amped up and edgy the past few days, I'm thinking there might be a predator or stray in the neighborhood. It's also been frickin' freezing.

                                    My trainer sat me down and talked with me, she had some really great, supportive things to say. Horseback riding, with the highs and lows, is the nature of the beast.. there will always be highs, and there will always be lows. We have come so far, and I DO realize that, but you guys know how it is; when it rains, it pours. I can handle the sh*t in small doses, but when it all hits you at once, AHHHHHHHH! Thanks for letting me whine about it, I did go home, cuddle up with my dog and boyfriend, and looked forward to another day.

                                    Currently contemplating heading to the barn now...

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                                    • #19
                                      Luckily, mine has a *really* cute face, so I feel like a big meanie once I get off from a ride I was frustrated by. Deep breaths while I'm walking him out and remembering how stellar he is when we're doing something FUN like xc (instead of evil dressage!) makes me calm down a lot
                                      "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Are you enjoying the majority of your rides? Or do you dread going to the barn? I ask because there is no shame in realizing that a horse is a bad match for you.

                                        Sometimes it takes a while to realize that a horse is a bad match. Some time ago, I was teaching my green-broke OTTB to jump, and I had a very frustrating lesson on him. The next weekend was Rolex, and I stood in line to get an autograph from William Fox-Pitt. I don't know what possessed me, but I wound up telling WFP about my frustration. He said, "wait for the coin to drop and persevere, if you like him."

                                        At that point I did like him, but as I introduced him to the sport, I found out that he didn't like dressage and didn't like XC. In other words, the coin never dropped. And I was finding it harder and harder to like the horse-- he bit and kicked (most of the time I could get out of the way, but sometimes he connected), and he was a chore to load on a trailer. After almost three years, I finally decided that the match wasn't there. He went to a lower-level H/J and trail home. I made room for my current wonderful horse, and I don't have "those days," period.
                                        SportHorseRiders.com
                                        Taco Blog
                                        *T3DE 2010 Pact*

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