• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Critique me and my little QH!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Critique me and my little QH!

    Blue Bell is my 10 year old, 15.2 hand quarter horse with a lot of attitude.

    My trainer pretty much told me that she wont progress past training level... based on the videos, what do you think?

    How is her movement?

    What can we work on?

    Note: Jumps and dressage at BN level.


    Jump:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSX2a9rkGHc

    Dressage:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SM7FbfDar-8

  • #2
    Your little horse is trying his heart out. You need to go back to basic flatwork and develop your seat, hands, lower leg and upper body control. Otherwise, your sweet horse is not going to get himself out of trouble and will catch a leg and flip over.

    Comment


    • #3
      She's adorable. I wouldn't worry about how far she will progress. Just focus on having fun and solidifying your basics for now. I wouldn't jump any bigger until you can consistently stay with her big jump without hitting her in the back or mouth. You two have the makings of a great team, enjoy it!

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Thank you both! I do have issues with following her sometimes, so I either get left behind or jump ahead of her. Over the past few weeks I have gotten a lot better.

        Thanks again!

        Comment


        • #5
          I think you horse is nice mover but because she is tad heavy on the forehand makes her not the safest jumper. Can you post a picture of her conformation? She may be built so slightly downhill which would make it difficult have a nice arc over fences.

          On the plus side, she is cute, looks likes she had a good work ethic, and looks fun to ride. I would just keep her and enjoy her! She looks like a very nice horse.

          Comment


          • #6
            She's super cute! Definitely heavy on the forehand. You need to release more and dont get left behind! She's getting popped in the mouth a lot, and you can tell she started to get irritated with it over a lot of the fences.
            Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
            White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

            Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.

            Comment


            • #7
              I liked your dressage work quite a bit. She fussed once or twice, but overall she looked very relaxed and obedient - how often do you see a tail that quiet in a test? Anyone? A flick on the canter depart, but seriously! And a lovely free walk. I don't see bad lower leg or seat in your flat work. I saw the hands and the upper body with your jumping; of course it's reasonable this is related to your base of support. I saw a very honest horse over those fences too! Just my very humble opinion, but I think the crest release should be your new best friend. And I would get very comfortable - and rock solid- with those heights in a stadium round before essaying them xc. There is always time to work up. If a horse's trust is lost o/f, it can't always be repaired. When I was a kid, people used to ask me if jumping wasn't dangerous. This was the way I was taught to answer: as long as I kept my horse safe, I'd be just fine.
              Blog: The Continuing Adventures of an (ahem) Mature Re-Rider without a Trust Fund...but, finally, A Farm of Her Own!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Very cute horse! You guys look like you're learning a lot together.
                For the dressage video, the first thing I noticed is that your reins are too loose. It's going to be difficult for your horse to be steady and work into the contact if the contact goes in and out. I know it can be difficult to find a balance between a contact that feels too loose and one that is too restrictive, but I would recommend practicing this at home. Try to establish a rein length that allows you to keep a consistent feel of your horse's mouth, then focus on keeping soft elbows and using your legs and seat to get more impulsion. If you can activate your horse impulsion wise and keep a steady, following contact, I think you will find the consistency pretty much immediately.
                Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue.

                A Voice Halted

                Comment


                • #9
                  She is a doll baby! I would put one of my students on her in a heart beat if you want to send her my way!

                  I agree with the posters who have said work on your base of support- grab mane, please!! Work with your trainer on developing her balance and using her back end. A downhill horse can do just fine jumping, you just have to work a little harder to make life easier for them. Good luck!
                  Big Idea Eventing

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree with the others. She is adorable! And you are doing a very good job.

                    Lovely, loose, supple, rhythmical mover in dressage for a horse of her breeding. To get better scores, she will need a bit more engagement into a more consistent connection.

                    In the jumping, she shows a great attitude and lots of power. I think she could suprise you with how far she can go.

                    Sometimes she jumped hard and you caught her in the mouth. Make sure you grab some mane on takeoff.

                    And sometimes she jumped out of balance. To improve her balance, work on the adjustability of the canter. Try the exercise of placing two poles on the ground 5 canter strides apart. And then practice doing the line in 5, 6, and even 7 strides. Don't just think "slow down" to add strides, think engage the canter by using half halts correctly from your leg and seat into your hand. If she gets strong, you can add a halt - reinback in the middle of the line a few times.

                    When you have the ability to adjust the strides in this exercise with a good quality canter (which is hard and may take a while!), your jumping will improve immensely!




                    http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com
                    http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You and your mare make a wonderful pair. She is very forgiving when you make an error, which is priceless to have in a horse.

                      Even if your mare is built downhill, there are exercises that can improve her.

                      As another poster said, using trotting pole and cantering pole exercises will help to improve her balance.

                      Doing Scales (walk, halt, trot, halt, trot, canter, trot, halt, canter, etc.) will help to get her weight shifted more onto her hind end. Do a max of four stides between the transitions. If the exercise makes her excited, then try more strides between the transitions. She should listen to your aides to improve her upward and downward transitions.

                      Use decreasing and increasing circles to encourage her inside hind to come up more underneath her body. You can leg yield from a small circle to a larger one, too.

                      Shorten and lengthen your stride, within the gait ie: working canter to canter lengthening to working canter, using your legs, seat and half halt to rebalance.

                      For her dressage test, she needs to have more engine. Think medium trot and medium canter to develop forward. Remember that forward is not faster, but longer strides with more energy. I really liked her free walk.

                      My mare is built downhill, too. These are the exercises that have helped her. She scores in the mid to low 30's (penalty points) for her dressage, now. BTW, there is nothing wrong with grabbing mane. I do it all of the time.

                      Good luck with her. Would you keep us informed with your progress?
                      When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What a good girl! No input other than that .
                        Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
                        Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
                        VW sucks.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What a cute horse! I think you make a great pair, and all the suggestions here have been great. Please keep us updated on your progress with her!
                          The Little Red Mare: French Curve

                          and my non-horse blog: oh, rebecca!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Agree with the crest release too.

                            If you watch your mare closely, she always has her ears forward on the next obstacle. She is hunting her fences. Currently she takes very good care of you. (which is also a credit to you, she wouldn't take care of you if it wasn't recipricated). She is confident, bold, cute, appears to carry a nice rhythm and she's tight below her knees. I do not believe she is working overly hard at the height you have shown in your videos. (all the signs of straining at that level are not there) I agree with all the comments that suggest you worry less about what level she can take you to. You have a ways to go (though you can tell you're doing really well) before you catch up to her. You haven't maxed out your ability to learn on this mare and her ability to be honest and take care of you is worth far more than "can she go training or not". Lovely horse. Have fun! Work on protecting her mouth over the fence and on the landing side.
                            Originally posted by mortebella View Post
                            I liked your dressage work quite a bit. She fussed once or twice, but overall she looked very relaxed and obedient - how often do you see a tail that quiet in a test? Anyone? A flick on the canter depart, but seriously! And a lovely free walk. I don't see bad lower leg or seat in your flat work. I saw the hands and the upper body with your jumping; of course it's reasonable this is related to your base of support. I saw a very honest horse over those fences too! Just my very humble opinion, but I think the crest release should be your new best friend. And I would get very comfortable - and rock solid- with those heights in a stadium round before essaying them xc. There is always time to work up. If a horse's trust is lost o/f, it can't always be repaired. When I was a kid, people used to ask me if jumping wasn't dangerous. This was the way I was taught to answer: as long as I kept my horse safe, I'd be just fine.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Your mare is seriously adorable. I agree with most of the posters above- keep on going with her. Do you know what her breeding is? She is eerily similar to a qh mare I know. Good Luck!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Very cute mare and the only thing I see that is glaring (in my opinion) is that she is jumping at the fence rather than across the fence. There is that slight hesitation then jumps pretty much straight up and over which is causing you to get left behind. My mare has a tendancy to do the same thing unless I have her really in front of my leg and lengthening her stride. Once you get her to open her stride you will notice a huge difference in her jumping. I know I do! Otherwise, very nice overall. Where is that x-c course? Looks like a fun place.
                                Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Mtn trails View Post
                                  Very cute mare and the only thing I see that is glaring (in my opinion) is that she is jumping at the fence rather than across the fence. There is that slight hesitation then jumps pretty much straight up and over which is causing you to get left behind. My mare has a tendancy to do the same thing unless I have her really in front of my leg and lengthening her stride. Once you get her to open her stride you will notice a huge difference in her jumping. I know I do! Otherwise, very nice overall. Where is that x-c course? Looks like a fun place.
                                  I saw the same thing - she needs to be more in front of your leg so she can jump better and it will be MUCH more comfy for you. I bet you'll find you're staying with her much easier! She looks like a sweetheart!

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    A year ago I couldn't even canter her because she was completely out of control. We have come a longggg way.

                                    I will definitely utilize the tips I've been given!

                                    For dressage, she tends to lean A LOT to where my arms hurt so I slowly let out the reins over the period that I ride. Since it is so hard for her to hold a frame I feel bad to make her be scrunched up the whole time...

                                    For jumping, I've had a hard time nailing my distances with her. She used to leap at the jump, but now she's gotten into the habit of hesitating and "bunny hopping" the jumps. My trainer says I am trying to micromanage her and I just need to let her go (that has been hard because she can rush jumps).

                                    She is out of Skys Blue Boy.

                                    I will try to find a confo pic of her.

                                    ETA: There were various cross country courses shown in the video: Texas Rose HT, Quail Run Farms, and Willow Draw.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I agree she is seriously cute!!

                                      I think everything will improve if you work more, with a GOOD trainer, on your Dressage work. She needs to learn to get that nice booty engaged and in gear, which will solve a great many issues, including being on her forehand and hardly going anywhere in her dressage test LOL

                                      I would not concern yourself AT ALL with what your trainer said about Training level. Find a good Dressage instructor (or a good Event trainer who has a strong background in Dressage) and work work work on that.
                                      ______________________________
                                      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        It looks like you have contact issues in dressage. A soft hand is good, but you shouldnt have flopping reins, especially the outside one. She also isnt using herself very well. It seems like you are letting her plod along on a loose contact rather than pushing her up into the bridle and asking her to use her back end. This will only help her jumping.

                                        The jumping is hit and miss. There were a lot of instances where she got too deep and lurched over the fences. I think this is mostly because you dont ride her forward enough on the flat (not faster, but with impulsion) and she is behind your leg almost all the time, which makes it much harder for her to jump out of her stride. You need to sit up way more in general, your core looks weak and you tip forward on approach to the fence which then makes it harder for her to find a good spot and jump well. If you sat up and rode her more forward I bet thing would go better.

                                        I also wouldnt worry about how far she will go. You will cross that bridge when you come to it because its probably awhile off. Just be careful you pay attention to when she does tell you, I see a lot of very kind willing horses pushed just a little past their capability levels, but they try so hard...and that can get dangerous.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X