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Proximal Suspensory Surgery Advice - Updates at end

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  • Proximal Suspensory Surgery Advice - Updates at end

    Rather bummed today , took my 7 year old QH/TB to NC State Vet hospital after a year of suspicious recurring lameness in left hind. He is literally in surgery as I write. After many blocks and funny apparatus that measured the stride (pretty cool) and can determine the location of and degree of lameness, the prognosis was 30-40% lameness in tendon sheath, 30-40% in upper suspensory (PSD), a little bit left over that could be attributed to minor hock arthritis (he has been injected but only with Hylartun V). He is barefoot in back, and has been brought up very slowly, only ever done BN. He is in surgery today there with tenoscopy and fasciotomy/neurectomy of upper suspensory. The reason I brought him was a reswelling of what was thought to be windpuff, but caused lameness. He is on HA (conqueor) and Horsetech supplement with monthly Adequan.

    Any light at the end of the tunnel stories out there for recoveries or advice / thoughts on getting through rehab??

    Sad mom...
    Last edited by dbamford; Apr. 14, 2011, 11:27 AM. Reason: fixing title

  • #2
    Originally posted by dbamford View Post
    Rather bummed today , took my 7 year old QH/TB to NC State Vet hospital after a year of suspicious recurring lameness in left hind. He is literally in surgery as I write. After many blocks and funny apparatus that measured the stride (pretty cool), the prognosis was 30-40% lameness in tendon sheath, 30-40% in upper suspensory (PSD), a little bit left over that could be attributed to very minor hock arthritis (he has been injected but only with Hylartun V). He is barefoot, and has been brought up very slowly, only ever done BN. He is in surgery today there with exploratory tenoscopy and fasciotomy/neurectomy of upper suspensory. He is on HA (conqueor) and Horsetech supplement with monthly Adequan.

    Any light at the end of the tunnel stories out there for recoveries or advice / thoughts on getting through rehab??

    Sad mom...
    Oh it's definitely worth crying over!

    My mare is recovering from a similar injury/surgery to her left hind. In her case it may have been a chronic issue from not the greatest leg conformation + being ridden by someone quite heavy before I got her. (She is about 850 pounds when she's in shape.) She had been NQR in that leg repeatedly over the 2 years I owned her before the injury was diagnosed. The previous time it was bad enough to get a vet involved, she was put on monthly IV polyglycan, which pretty much took care of the lameness for about a year. But in January, she was limping, and after 6 weeks of trying various things and on again/off again lameness, the suspensory was ultrasounded and the problem was clear as day.

    (I should say that while I bought her for low-level eventing, I did almost no jumping on her, and then had a bad fall from another horse that put my jumping days to an end. We'd gone into dressage training after that, and were taking a break from that level of intensity when she was diagnosed.)

    Anyway!

    We are now 6 months post-surgery and while I am not riding her yet, she's rehabbing pretty well. The aftercare in the first month post-surgery was pretty intense -- bandages for the first 2 weeks, standing wraps for another 3 weeks after that, hand walking 3 times a day, and worrying intensely every time she went up on her hind legs during a spook. At 2 months, her US didn't look that good but my vet recommended cutting back on the handwalking to once a day (30-40 minutes) and giving her a few hours per day in a tiny turnout (the size of 2 stalls) with some Ace on board. Turnout really saved her brain; being stall-bound was making her a spooky mess when it came time for hand walking. And that's been our regimen ever since.

    At 4 months her US looked a lot better. At about 3 months, there'd been some question about whether I should start riding her at the walk; I tried a few times, but just did not feel like she was up to it. My local vet, who tends to the conservative, reamed me out for trying, and then realized I was on his side and willing to wait, in hopes of getting a showably sound horse, rather than rushing and getting a serviceably sound one. (The vet who recommended riding does not think the horse will ever be more than serviceably sound, but I chose to go with the local vet's more hopeful, if more patience-requiring, approach.)

    Her next US is in 2 weeks. At this point she is sound at the walk, though very stiff in the hind end in general, and she may need joint injections. She does have arthritis in her hocks. It would not surprise me at all if the vet OKs her for short walks under saddle, or very brief hand-jogging... but it would not surprise me at all if he says to wait. (This is how she looked 3 weeks before surgery and this is how we looked a few weeks ago.)

    She was given an 80% chance of a full recovery and I am doing my best to stay optimistic, but it's not easy! She is naturally a very active horse, and we are both *very* bored at this point.

    You have my jingles for your horse and **hugs** for you.

    PM me if you'd like info on how to read more of a "diary" of how things have gone.
    Last edited by quietann; Sep. 4, 2010, 10:05 AM.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Quietanne--she looks really good on the second walk, beautiful mare! You give me hope for my guy. Did she have actually lesions on the suspensory, or thickening (think that is my guy)? Wish you luck, seems like you are almost out of the woods on the worst of the rehab.

      Vet just called what a laundry list of surgery, but Dr. Schramme at NCSU is awesome, quite impressive CV. So Venture from what I understand had, tendon sheath tenoscopy-uncomplicated adhesions removed, annular ligament cut due to mild constriction. Then up above fasciotomy/neuroctomy on suspensory. No tendon damage, no other noticeable lesions, etc. I am mind-boggled on why he has such issues. Has had correct work, vets said a little bit upright hocks, but not ridiculous. He is not hyper in pasture, slightly lazy sort, not spooky-super brave. He was born on my parents farm, so I am--of course-- quite attached. Really wondering what his long term prognosis will be. No lesions good of course, but a lot of work done in those surgeries--not complicated but lots!

      Here are some pics of him at BN trial a bit ago:
      http://www.hoofclix.com/Pine-Top-Far...68027761_FnpWQ

      He has been such a great jumper, it just breaks my heart to think his career is over, but I will not run him into the ground either! Wish us luck, trying to be brave here...
      Last edited by dbamford; Sep. 3, 2010, 08:29 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Every horse is an individual, so I don't want to draw parallels...

        but my beloved big horse came up lame 2 1/2 years ago and was diagnosed with bilateral hind suspensory tears......he had fasciotomy done on both sides by a very experienced surgeon.

        30 days strict stall rest, then hand walking, walking under saddle, aced turnout, etc. He is an extremely well behaved guy so except for some blowups in turnout we never had a bad step...

        He was sound at the trot 3 months out and never looked back. Did 3 follow up shockwaves and returned to work VERY slowly.

        Ultrasounds looked progressively better and better.

        He was back to his previous level of work 14 months out (probably could have been sooner but I took it very slowly). He was sound and w-t-c much sooner than that but I'm talking about 2nd level dressage, jumping 3'3", galloping, etc.

        He got kicked in the field right after his return to work and that set him back all over again, but he's now doing beautifully.


        Good luck!!! Do NOT shortcut the rehab!!!
        The big man -- my lost prince

        The little brother, now my main man

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dbamford View Post
          Quietanne--she looks really good on the second walk, beautiful mare! You give me hope for my guy. Did she have actually lesions on the suspensory, or thickening (think that is my guy)? Wish you luck, seems like you are almost out of the woods on the worst of the rehab.

          Vet just called what a laundry list of surgery, but Dr. Schramme at NCSU is awesome, quite impressive CV. So Venture from what I understand had, tendon sheath tenoscopy-uncomplicated adhesions removed, annular ligament cut due to mild constriction. Then up above fasciotomy/neuroctomy on suspensory. No tendon damage, no other noticeable lesions, etc. I am mind-boggled on why he has such issues. Has had correct work, vets said a little bit upright hocks, but not ridiculous. He is not hyper in pasture, slightly lazy sort, not spooky-super brave. He was born on my parents farm, so I am--of course-- quite attached. Really wondering what his long term prognosis will be. No lesions good of course, but a lot of work done in those surgeries--not complicated but lots!
          Your horse is a cutie! I can sort of see the same too-straight hind leg conformation in the photos as my mare has. Mine also toes in in front, and has offset knees (worse on the right, which also has a big splint, as is common in these cases). Her gaits are very good other than a little paddling in front; she does not interfere or strike herself, has great feet and goes barefoot most of the time.

          Your guy's surgery sounds a bit more complicated. Mine just had the fasciotomy/partial neurectomy, and the area was treated with platelet-enriched plasma. She was at the vet hospital for 3 days; they had thought they would have her for 5, but the incision was healing well and she was not happy in the hospital environment and dropped a lot of weight, so they let us go early.

          She just had the thickened suspensory, no tear or lesion anywhere, but it was *very* thickened.

          I am sort of happy I can't jump anymore as I won't be tempted to jump her (she was a keen jumper with an eventer's sense of self-preservation.) We are going to enjoy our middle aged decrepitude together. I do have options for retiring her to pasture if need be, but right now it looks very unlikely that I will need to do that.
          You have to have experiences to gain experience.

          1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Venture also had some pulmonary oedema issue coming out of surgery. Frothy nose, coughing, lasix applied twice. Thank god he was at that clinic. He now has to stay for an extra few days for more antibiotics to reduce risk of pneumonia!

            Anyone done any ESWT following surgery? Not trying to speed up rehab, I intend to be as conservative as possible, but just trying to think of anything that might improve his recovery. Quiteann--the PRP was not mentioned in our case, have been reading up on that as well just out of personal interest in all things horsey!

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Asterix and Quietann...

              What were your rehab plans...?

              And thinking ahead, trying to be optimistic...

              What were the plans and increments of exercise once you got to that point?
              Asterix, love the pics of your big guy--pre or post injury? He has an impressive jump!

              Pre surgery my vet gave us 3 months stall rest, have not spoken to him post about the rehab plan, think we will chat in person when I go get him.

              Either of you ever tried hydrotherapy? There is an equine hydro option here rather locally and I am wondering if he would benefit.

              Comment


              • #8
                The vet surgeon who worked on my mare is at Fairfield Equine in CT, which is one of the places that developed the fasciotomy. They do so many that they have a sheet with their standard rehab program.

                Keep in mind that my mare's condition was not as extreme as your horse's.

                Anyway: the program is based on controlled exercise. We started with 3 5 minute hand walks per day, starting the day after surgery, for 2 weeks, then 3 10 minute walks, and then adding 5 minutes per walk each week. At some point (25 minutes???) the walks were dropped to two per day. I walked her in her standing wraps for the first 6 weeks or so.

                Both the vet surgeon and the local vet prefer that I walk her on hard ground rather than in one of the arenas with "footing." My BO isn't the greatest about maintaining footing, and it develops deep spots. (You probably know that in the UK, riding horses on paved roads is part of their fitness-building regimen, to strengthen their tendons.)

                Two months in, as I said above, my local vet recommended a small turnout (made from 6 stock panels) in place of one of the daily hand walks, so the mare could move about more freely than she could in her stall. She spent the first day turned out eating every last bit of grass in the pen, and the second day rolling. (She is small enough to roll in her stall, but rarely does.) Turnout isn't standard Fairfield practice, and the surgeon there was a bit worried, but with Ace and enough supervision, it's been very good for her, and quite a relief for me as I only have to go to the barn once per day.

                Hand grazing is a really important part of working with the bored, squirrely mare. I also used a chain over her nose after discovering just how scary a big spook could be. (She'd back up, rear straight up and start to spin, and then come down barely putting weight on her injured leg.) The chain didn't stop the spooks, but it kept them more manageable. She was looking for things to spook at, I think just because she was so bored. (I am not using the chain anymore, after realizing just how dependent I was getting on it; the mare is a dominant one, and without the chain she was pushing me around. We've spent a lot of time working on basic respect recently. She is better on the ground when she's being ridden regularly.)

                Issues besides spooking: she HATED her standing wraps and keeping them on her wasn't easy. I was very happy to ditch them at 8 weeks. She also tended to kick the stall walls with her bad leg, though she does not do that anymore.

                Things I was careful about: I tried not to back her up at all, kept her walks on level ground for about 6 weeks (not easy since much of the place where I board has gentle slopes), and whenever possible did not turn her in a tight circle. I'm not so worried about these things now, but I don't back her up more than a few steps, and only if she's behaving badly. I also have not trailered her since the surgery.

                I also used a NibbleNet with small holes for her hay when she was mostly confined to her stall, just to give her more time doing something (eating). She tends to hoover her food, and is also one of those horses who will spend time sifting through her bedding to eat every last scrap of hay and grain. Her grain ration is now less than a quart a day, of Sentinel Performance LS, in two feedings, and a cup of hay stretcher at night feeding, mostly so she doesn't kick down the barn because other horses are being fed and she isn't!

                (And hydrotherapy would probably be great, but I don't have access to it. At the very least she probably wouldn't be as FAT as she is now.)
                You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Your surgery sounds a bit more complicated than what Gully had, but he had it on both hind legs at the same time. He was on mostly stall rest (some light handwalking but I was told not to do too much) for six weeks, then brought back slowly. To help keep him from being bored to death, I bought a "cookie machine" online--it was a sort of cylinder he had to bang around the stall to make it dispense horse cookies. Look up "zoo enrichment tools" and you'll find it.

                  For us, the results were fabulous. He was never completely off, just persistently NQR--but afterwards, so much better. He'd gone through Novice before the surgery; less than a year later he was running Novice again. Now, several years later, we've been at Training for some time and are beginning to feel that Prelim will be possible. I hope all goes super for your guy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dbam, those pics are pre but i have every intention of getting some post... he is just back competing and loving it!

                    We did ESWT 3x 1/mo after.

                    He was on strict stall rest for 30 days -- I did handgraze him behind the barn but he is a prince and chances of antics=0. Then hand walking 1mo, walking undersaddle 1 mo, all still stall rest. We began v limited aced turnout at 3 mos. He was up to all day turnout in modest paddock with quiet buddy by 5 months, W-T-C on level ground. At 7 months he was back 24-7 in his 70 acre field with herd and doing pretty decent flatwork and gentle hacks.
                    The big man -- my lost prince

                    The little brother, now my main man

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Venture is back in town, it was a long trying ride home but he's here! Talking to NCSU they feel that the surgeries he had were very straightforward and simple. That is great news, but in my 30+ years of horse ownership, this is my first surgery, so a big deal to me. I think the frame of reference, vet school that does surgery every day to little old me, is a bit different! Guess I have been lucky thusfar.

                      So his recovery schedule is; 10-14 days remove stitches and hylartin in tendon sheath (fetlock) at time of removal, two days after stiches removal start handwalking at 5 minute intervals increasing each week by 5 minutes, weeks 4 and 6 out from surgery more hylartin in tendon sheath (to keep adhesions from reforming). Stall rest for 2 months, wrapped while in. Month three small enclosure turnout at gradual increasing intervals. At month four, local vet reassess and determine if ready for riding.

                      The poor thing, had his first bandage change today--leg looks good, he stood like an angel, but broke out in sweat from having the leg looked at!

                      Wish us luck, we handgrazed a little today, all was well...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good luck!!! Welcome to the handgraze while you can club...before they get too wild or the grass goes away with winter!

                        I just bought some of these and hung one in his stall using twine. My guy thought it was great...not sure hw long it will last.

                        http://www.smartpakequine.com/Produc...3&cm_vc=Search

                        This has been very popular in the past and last a while but I don't have a way to hang one in his stall....may work for you!

                        http://www.smartpakequine.com/Produc...7&cm_vc=Search
                        ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Lots of good advice here.

                          My mare was diagnosed with PSD on both hind legs. We did the fasciotomy/neurectomy and also the PRP injections.

                          I took my time on her rehab, and after 6 months, she was back to w/t/c with increasing amounts of time. However, I never really powered her up for a full year post surgery. We are now about 2 years post surgery, and she helped me earn my Bronze level (dressage) this year and is moving the best she ever has.

                          I would recommend either Reserpine or Fluphenazine for the first couple of months. Once they lose a bit of their fitness, it is easier to keep them quiet, but the first couple of months can be difficult. Drugs are your friend.

                          One other little tip, is I started using Bonds Gold Powder under her standing wraps (obviously, after the suture line was completely healed). She was getting so itchy under the wrap, and the powder really helped out with that.

                          The surgery gave my mare a whole new career, and I have never regretted it. Just take your time on the rehab.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dbamford View Post
                            Venture is back in town, it was a long trying ride home but he's here! Talking to NCSU they feel that the surgeries he had were very straightforward and simple. That is great news, but in my 30+ years of horse ownership, this is my first surgery, so a big deal to me. I think the frame of reference, vet school that does surgery every day to little old me, is a bit different! Guess I have been lucky thusfar.

                            So his recovery schedule is; 10-14 days remove stitches and hylartin in tendon sheath (fetlock) at time of removal, two days after stiches removal start handwalking at 5 minute intervals increasing each week by 5 minutes, weeks 4 and 6 out from surgery more hylartin in tendon sheath (to keep adhesions from reforming). Stall rest for 2 months, wrapped while in. Month three small enclosure turnout at gradual increasing intervals. At month four, local vet reassess and determine if ready for riding.

                            The poor thing, had his first bandage change today--leg looks good, he stood like an angel, but broke out in sweat from having the leg looked at!

                            Wish us luck, we handgrazed a little today, all was well...
                            That sounds very similar to my mare's schedule. Keep handgrazing; it's nice bonding time and hopefully your horse will be more interested in grass than in acting like a goof.

                            I had to growl a lot at the mare to get her to let me put standing wraps on her. She hates having stuff on her legs. But, to her credit, the one time I lost my balance while wrapping her and ended up curled on my side underneath her, she stood perfectly still until I extracted myself.

                            Her follow-up US is in a week and everyone who has watched her walking recently thinks I'll be back in the saddle for short rides right after that. Luckily we are heading into winter, so I am in no hurry to bring her back. My big goal for 2011 is to take her to the open dressage/Morgan schooling show at Vermont Morgan Heritage Days in early July. If all we do is the Intro tests, that's fine.
                            You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                            1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Just an update for dbamford and others...

                              I still can't ride my mare but the vet is very pleased with her progress. Her suspensory fibers are growing and reconnecting; the suspensory doesn't look "normal" but the vet says that it probably never will, but he think she will be 100% sound for flatwork eventually.

                              He watched her at the walk (sound) and trot. Poor mare was a bit confused about being asked to trot, as no one has in over 6 months. She's very stiff in her hocks but the right actually looks worse that the left (where the surgery was.)

                              Current plan is to add 5 minutes or trotting in hand, either jogging beside her or on the longe, to her regular 30 minute hand walk for 2 weeks, and go up to 10 minutes trotting for 2 weeks more if she handles 5 OK, and then vet will recheck and I may get to start walking her under saddle. This is all done with a small dose of Ace on board to help keep her from getting silly.

                              I trotted her for the 3rd time today and her hocks already look better. Mare is making a lot of mare faces as I think she's realized that her 6-month vacation is coming to an end For a horse who can be a bit jazzy, she's amazingly lazy.

                              dbamford, how is your guy doing?
                              You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                              1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                QuietAnne, sorry its been awhile, got caught up in rehab and work catch-up following all the horsey baby-sitting.

                                So we are 1 month + into stall rest. He has been an angel. Taking it well, reserpine is a blessing right now. Had his stitches removed two weeks ago and all looked well. Had a bit of a scare one week after when he opened the incision once the big compression wrap was off (think from being able to flex leg up). It is healing well now again though.

                                Couple quick questions, he has some swelling behind incision site (along side leg, below hock). Did this happen to your mare after surgery? My local vet did not seem very concerned, prescribed a steroid ointment to help with it. Does your mare have visible thickened area where surgery was done? I can compare Venture's as he only had one leg done. Its nothing major-but its there. He is getting around great, we are up to 15 minute walk per day. Does seem a bit hock stiff in the am. Keeping him on his adequan monthly just because. Also have him on a joint supplement Hylasport CTS. Have you been keeping wrapped 24/7? I have been giving few hours off during daylight, except right after injections, then back to constant wraps. What was your wrapping protocol? NC was not very specific, just wanted wrapped til sutures removed, then standing wraps if desired.

                                Local vet very pleased with tendon sheath, looks normal now, almost no swelling around fetlock. Had his HA injection there yesterday, one more to go in two weeks.

                                I am crossing my fingers, no blow ups during hand grazing, he gets about an hour a day and his hand walking. He gets stall switch too, between am and pm so he can watch friends in pasture. We are building a tiny run-in for his turnout at 3 months. It is about twice the size of stall, I call it his 'double-wide.' Planning to start with 1 hour per day and ace.

                                QuietAnne--with all that running beside your mare you are sure getting a work-out LOL!! At least if we can't ride something will keep us fit. Mine is the stall cleaning from two stalls...What we will do for the love of horses. Wish us continued luck, thinking of you and your mare, I have good and bad days with thinking long-term.

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                                • #17
                                  I have a student whose horse had it done on both of his hind legs last Feb, and he is now doing great! She really took the time to bring him back slowly (he's just now starting to jump again), and he's looking stronger every day.

                                  Only time will tell if he will hold up to eventing again, but the vets are optimistic, and this horse was quite lame.

                                  Good luck! It's a long road bringing them back from it, but it CAN be done!
                                  http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com

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                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Chatted with Dr. Schramme about the swelling behind incision site and he suspects he is slightly reactive to the internal sutures dissolving. Not infected, per local vet, but we are back on some Bute, and steroid cream at incision site. Will be starting Surpass over the slight swelling when local vet drops some by. The tendon sheath looks beatiful below (well small windpuff), you can't tell it had surgery. I have backed off walking a little until the top swelling goes down, mostly just hand grazing right now.


                                    Istevenson, Cooper thanks for the success stories, keep them coming it helps me get through the down moments!

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                                    • #19
                                      update: I had to stop running, because it bothers my knees (as it has since I was a kid, and I am 46 now...) But we have figured out the lunge, ideal adjustment of sidereins, etc. She is being a diva about returning to work; in her opinion, 10 minutes of trotting (with breaks) is a marathon. I *should* be on her back by the end of the month, which would mean 8 months since I stopped riding her. Chiropractor saw her today and found very little in need of adjustment. I am planning to have a saddle fitter out sometime this month to help me with padding for her saddle, since she's lost her lovely topline and is quite fat.

                                      Dbamford, she did have a little bit of swelling around the incision site for several months, but it's pretty much gone now. There is a small scar, but it just goes with the others she has from cutting her leg in several places right after I started turning her out again (she got it stuck on a stock panel clip.) For several months, I used Traumeel, a homeopathic cream, on the incision. No, I don't really believe in homeopathy, but if nothing else, the "inactive ingredients" in the cream are moisturizing and soothing to the skin.

                                      She was on Ace 3x per day for the first few weeks and we cut it back gradually, and now she gets a little (whole or crushed pills, with food) before she's turned out, and before I lunge her if the morning dose has worn off. It's a very small dose, but she's a small horse -- weighs about 850 pounds when fit.

                                      I had her in wraps 24/7 for the first 4 weeks, and then only at night for another month. She hates wraps with a passion and once she was off the 3x/day Ace, it was more dangerous to keep her in them, because she'd kick the walls, scrape one leg against the other, etc. trying to remove them. So she has been unwrapped for a while now. Luckily she does not tend to stock up, except in response to certain foods -- flax seed of all things, and a weed that grows in the grass here we call "plantain" although I don't know for sure that's what it is.

                                      I have kept up with her monthly IV polyglycan injections, and she is on SmartRepair supplement. She was on SmartFlex II before she went lame.

                                      I have an online friend who's been training a WB who just had the surgery done on both hind legs. He's taking the stall rest remarkably well, for a big, difficult horse. She had shown him in First and Second level dressage and taken him to a few schooling jumper shows, and was conditioning him for eventing -- but he was just NQR, and ultrasound finally showed what the problem was. Fingers are crossed for him to recover well; for the right rider, he'd be a great upper level prospect.

                                      Rehab is just tough with these cases; there's so much "playing it by ear."
                                      You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                                      1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

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                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        The other item I have been mulling over is shoeing. Right now Venture is barefoot all the way around while on stall rest and for the start of his 'turnout' next month. Although a QH/TB, he does not have the QH feet. What has most likely contributed to his injury is conformation--as discussed above straight hocks, and long pasterns but I wonder if the low heels have contributed as well. We have always squared hi back toes to ease breakover. He wore shoes in the front, but was barefoot behind. In my discharge papers they recommended eggbar or extended heel shoes once he is ready to start work again. How are others dealing with past psd issues and shoeing, any changes?

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