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Online "dating service" (Spinoff from "sponsorship" thread

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  • Online "dating service" (Spinoff from "sponsorship" thread

    It seems pretty obvious that there are breeders/owners of young, talented horses who can`t/don`t want to bring them on, but who would love to see them go on.
    It`s equally obvious that there are talented but underfunded riders who need good horses.
    Could there not be some sort of "dating service" to acquaint one group with the other?
    Obviously, "acquaintance" would be only the initial step. How any deal could be arranged from that point on would be through negotiation between the parties. However, if there`s some way to provide that first step, it might prove to be a vital service to both owners and riders.
    I`m ignorant about how these are structured, but couldn`t someone make some money providing such a service?
    http://www.tamarackhill.com/

  • #2
    It sounds like an outstanding idea, and one I've done before, but only through word of mouth.

    From the outset it seems like it would be an easy thing to set up a website to do something like that. Thing would be to get people to actually use it.

    I think it would only work as a means to pass initial information, details would have to be worked out by the respective parties, and I would imagine that the riders would have to provide references, perhaps even include 'supervision' by a reputable trainer/professional as part of the arrangement.

    Comment


    • #3
      Absolutely!
      I've had a couple of people approach ME (36 and flopping) about starting youngsters. Ummm, yeah, I don't bounce anymore.
      Anyway, what I'm thinking is to make this a USEA sponsored activity. Why? Because they need some pr. And then they can host a discussion forum on this without an extra expense to someone.
      The breeders can list what horses they have and then the riders can apply to them. I would think it be lovely if the couple of ws my instructor has would take on a couple of babies.
      Hey, Emily Daily! I KNOW you're out there and I KNOW who your mama is! And I KNOW you've taken on some of her babies. How about helping us out here?
      Even duct tape can't fix stupid

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LisaB View Post
        Absolutely!
        The breeders can list what horses they have and then the riders can apply to them. I would think it be lovely if the couple of ws my instructor has would take on a couple of babies.
        I think it could work either way; have the breeders list their horses, or have the riders post some sort of profile, with their experience, disciplines, locations, etc. Great idea!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by denny View Post
          It seems pretty obvious that there are breeders/owners of young, talented horses who can`t/don`t want to bring them on, but who would love to see them go on.
          It`s equally obvious that there are talented but underfunded riders who need good horses.
          Could there not be some sort of "dating service" to acquaint one group with the other?
          Obviously, "acquaintance" would be only the initial step. How any deal could be arranged from that point on would be through negotiation between the parties. However, if there`s some way to provide that first step, it might prove to be a vital service to both owners and riders.
          I`m ignorant about how these are structured, but couldn`t someone make some money providing such a service?
          With all due respect, if you read the sponsorship thread closely, the problem both of these two groups (breeders & riders) have is lack of MONEY to campaign a horse for it to reach it's full potential.

          Until someone steps up to the plate with dollars, you are still going to be in the same boat.
          www.OneJumpAhead.ca

          Comment


          • #6
            combining resources?

            "With all due respect, if you read the sponsorship thread closely, the problem both of these two groups (breeders & riders) have is lack of MONEY to campaign a horse for it to reach it's full potential.

            Until someone steps up to the plate with dollars, you are still going to be in the same boat. "

            But what about combining resources?

            A breeder with a nice young horse could get a good, but unknown and underfunded rider on their horse. Rider, good, but unknown, gets a nicer horse under them than they could afford to buy.

            Breeder and rider could work out an arrangement where they split costs, and perhaps agree that the youngster would be marketed by rider for a marginal commission upon sale. Breeder could require as a condition of their agreement that rider take X number of lessons with X trainer, as appropriate.

            By pooling their resources, perhaps they could do things to better each other?

            Comment


            • #7
              If a starving rider finds starving breeder and they bring up a horse properly, then that horse goes for more money than an unbroke or badly broke horse. Then they start accumulating $$. While that first youngster may be going advanced and the younger 'lost out', it bodes well that the horse started well and the breeder gets more popular.
              Really, all the rider has to do is show up at breeder's facility and put the horse under saddle. Then take the horse for a road trip to BNT and then spread the word. They don't necessarily need to do the YEH stuff to begin with. Eventually, they can once funds start coming in and they need more feathers in their cap. But that the bottom line of what is actually needed. And it's not expensive.
              Even duct tape can't fix stupid

              Comment


              • #8
                Denny, this is a great suggestion. I have a couple of horses that I'd like to see actually *do* something, but I can't afford to pay someone to bring them along and get them out showing, but I can afford to support the horse and pay entry/clinic/lesson fees -- just not pay the rider as well.

                So, especially as my baby grows up, I'd love to find someone that would be willing to do this. We've also got a 7 year old Hungarian that needs to be restarted and is intimidating to those of us that don't bounce so good anymore, or in my case, I'm just not sure what to do with him to get him going well -- so far, we've been unable to find anyone that is interested in working with him and reschooling him without sending him off for Training with a capital "T" We'd love to find someone looking for a ride on a nice horse, and his owner is even willing to pay someone to ride, but would prefer not to have to send him off to camp with a Trainer.

                It seems that in years past, young folks looking for nice horses were everywhere, and now, we keep asking people, and can't find anyone interested.

                A "dating" service might be just the ticket!

                libby
                I have Higher Standards ...do you? Find us on FB!
                Higher Standards Custom Leather Care -- Handcrafted Saddle Soap

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is a really interesting idea....I would fall on the rider side of this equation, would be really interested in hearing how it would work.
                  RIP My Beautiful Kevin
                  2003-2009
                  RIP Sweet Ella
                  2009-2011

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm also in the rider side of things and I know TONS of people in the same boat as me who would be willing to ride and show if someone were willing to help them and put a good horse under them...
                    Big Idea Eventing

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think this could work. One of the reasons money is such an issue is that by the time you spend $50K on a nice young horse, you have nothing left to campaign it. If the breeder donates the horse, I know my kids would LOVE to train and compete it at their expense (maybe with a little help from the breeder)! The money becomes much less of an issue.
                      \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We almost have something similar here- the Riderless Horses/ Horseless Riders topic. It seems to work pretty well.... and if I'm not mistaken, there is a dedicated website/ BB. It's more targeted to "normal" riders, but I don't see why it would not work for more upper level horses and riders.

                        I don't think there are any fees involved- the only costs are the BB and that can be paid for through a free hosting service. Publicity is as cheap as posting a link online and word of mouth. You could have a link through the USEA as well.


                        To Ravencrest- I am a half leaser. It allows me to ride a nicer horse and have only half the bills. It allows the owner to keep her horse and have only half the bills. Anytime you can get away from the typical "you buy a horse and pay 100% of the bills" or "you pay 100% of the bills and for someone to ride" it helps make a dent. And, if monies become available, it helps two parties instead of one. Perhaps a young rider gets a ride on a nice youngster for free- which saves her from minimum $5000/year in horse keeping expenses (can be used on clinics and shows). The breeder gets free training on a horse they had to support anyway.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LisaB View Post
                          If a starving rider finds starving breeder and they bring up a horse properly, then that horse goes for more money than an unbroke or badly broke horse. Then they start accumulating $$. While that first youngster may be going advanced and the younger 'lost out', it bodes well that the horse started well and the breeder gets more popular.
                          Really, all the rider has to do is show up at breeder's facility and put the horse under saddle. Then take the horse for a road trip to BNT and then spread the word. They don't necessarily need to do the YEH stuff to begin with. Eventually, they can once funds start coming in and they need more feathers in their cap. But that the bottom line of what is actually needed. And it's not expensive.


                          Would love to know just "what" shade of rose those glasses are?

                          Lets see...put saddle on young horse, start basic work, load horse and offer to BNT...
                          I think I should start planning how I am going to spend all the money I am going to make.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Snoops,
                            I was making generalizations of the plan. Jeez!
                            It's Monday! Put the cat claws back in!
                            Even duct tape can't fix stupid

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Lisa:

                              I think my post would have come off better had I put in all the "smile things"...It was meant to convey "I wish it were that easy...for me". It was not meant to be snarky...sorry darling


                              A kind of "I'll have what she's having"!!!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Okay snoopy. I get it
                                And what I'm having? A new year diet complete with a new cafe that open downstairs with smells of fresh pastries. Bastards! And here I sit with my fake chicken fingers and bowl of light veggie soup. Ugh!
                                And I hear about breeder stories! You couldn't pay me to be a breeder!
                                Even duct tape can't fix stupid

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by LisaB View Post

                                  And I hear about breeder stories! You couldn't pay me to be a breeder!

                                  And that was what my post was meant to be about...

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Darn...thought this might be a really useful thread on dating!!

                                    Oh well...in concept...this seems like a good idea but in reality...not so sure if it is necessary.

                                    When I was a starving rider....it wasn't hard at ALL to find these deals. You have to be willing to show up, be decent and kind rider...and put yourself out there to make it happen. It required me being nice, returning calls....letting people know I was willing to ride anything (and riding anything). You have to spend some time riding some not so nice horses (with a smile on your face) and if you have any talent, the better rides do become available. And you have to find a way to work other jobs to support yourself (I worked in the barn mucking stalls as well as being a waitress). Maybe I was just lucky....but I don't think so. I think too many riders expect it to be handed to them...and it doesn't work that way. You have to be willing to shovel some Sh*& as well as ride....and the people who are willing to do that will find the opportunities.

                                    What is that hardest thing is learning how to break a youngster well....and I learned that by working for good people and watching anyone I could. Breaking youngsters is a skill that not all riders have.....but once you have that skill, finding rides is NOT hard at all (well at least not in this area). I think the trouble breeders may have is the supply and demand....finding riders with the skill to start youngsters well is hard just because there is a small supply of them for a large demand. If they are any good at it....they can get paid for it.

                                    One of the best places to learn....working for a TB farm and breaking the race horses. But while I love the youngsters...please note that it is a good way to get hurt. I've spent my fair share of my time in the ER from the 2/3 year olds....and the more talented the youngster....the farther, faster and harder they can plant you...even if they have a good mind, it is just part of being a youngster!!!
                                    ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      This is an excellent idea!

                                      Originally Posted by LisaB
                                      "Absolutely!
                                      The breeders can list what horses they have and then the riders can apply to them".


                                      I agree with the breeders listing what horses they have but I also think it would be beneficial for the riders to list themselves with some info like where they are located, a bit about their riding history, etc. That way the breeders could search out a rider.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        If you list them, they will come...

                                        A really great idea, although the devil might be in the details.

                                        However, I wonder if running the service via the USEA could qualify the participants for insurance discounts. Insuring the horses, making sure that the riders have health/ disablity insurance would go a long way towards making me feel more comfortable with either taking on someone else's horse, or having someone other than me on my horse.

                                        Also, perhaps the USEA could find a qualified person to post a standard agreement to cover such arrangements, that would allow participants to choose options from a menu to tailor the agreement to their own needs.

                                        Nothing involving horses is without risk, but with a little advance planning, risks can be minimized, and everyone can feel more comfortable in a given situation.

                                        Just the two cents of a recovering lawyer's wife.
                                        They don't call me frugal for nothing.
                                        Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.

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