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Anyone event with a non-traditional breed?

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  • #21
    Morgan here!

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    • #22
      Wasn't there a Morgan mare ages ago who went long-format advanced? Kate Linley!

      Comment


      • #23
        Shagyas make very good eventers. They were originally bred to be cavalry horses - and three-day eventing used to be called "The Military" back in the day. So you might say they were bred to run and jump.

        Comment


        • #24
          Lots of Arabs can easily event to Training level (and beyond). Especially more the French, Polish or Russian lines. There are some really well bred (more French lines) Arabs for Racing in Maryland. Jane Sleeper in PA sometimes gets a few for retraining. Several have been really lovely.
          ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

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          • #25
            Originally posted by JER View Post

            Mine was inexplicably terrified of paper.


            Oh my goodness. Well, I'd say there's really nothing that Max is afraid of, but any horses going faster than he in any other direction really riles him up. So if he sees the whippers-in flying off in the other direction, he realllyyyy wants to join that party.

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            • #26
              We always have a handful of 'oddballs' in our neck of the woods at the lower to mid levels, including a clydesdale, haflingers, fjords, a couple standardbreds, and a saddlebred. With all of that being said - Morgans make excellent eventers! I got my start in eventing on a horse of unknown breeding who was very likely morgan or morgan x. As far as I'm concerned, they're basically warmbloods, and will excel at most sports as such. Check out Tamarak Hill Farm on fb for morgan and eventing inspiration

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              • #27
                One of my current eventers is 14.1 of sassy grade pony who probably has some Standardbred heritage because her canter is a bit egg-beater and she trots like a freak. She has stepped up to 95 cm and will hopefully go higher.

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                • #28
                  I have Saddlebred x Draft crosses and have evented two to good effect. No one cares. That's the wonderful thing about eventing - no breed prejudice. The only thing that matters is if your horse can do the job. I've been concentrating on dressage for the past year and while it uncomplicates my life concentrating on one discipline, I will admit to boredom. Pick a horse that makes you happy and go for it. Just about any is capable of coping through the lower levels. I recently bought a Norwegian Fjord yearling. His sire events. Don't know if I'll try eventing on him but I certainly have not ruled it out.
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                  • #29
                    This was many years ago, but I competed successfully through Training on a 14 hand Arab. I can't tell you his bloodlines because he was found as a stray (believe it or not) as a yearling. I won more blue ribbons with this guy than I ever thought possible! RIP Mighty Mouse.
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                    • Original Poster

                      #30
                      Thanks everyone for sharing their stories!!

                      downen- Mighty Mouse was a Rock Star!! His photos melted my heart. I guess, deep down, I’ll always be an Arabian lover!

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                      • #31
                        One of my most special volunteers moments was as a ring steward watching a Saddlebred calmly singlefooting between the fences over some lower level show jumping course. Had no idea that a horse could jump out of something other than a trot or canter, but honestly it was the best round of the day. Ears pricked, calm and sane, hit every spot dead on, never flinched, lovely form over the fences. (That is, I guess he was "singlefooting", it was a fast floating 4-beat gait that was so smooth, I nearly converted right way to Saddlebreds. LOL )

                        And one of the most fun parts of eventing spectating is taking a seat on the cross-country Beginner Novice course to watch the Parade of Breeds and Non-Breeds as they canter by.

                        Here comes the grade pinto energetically lifting his short legs over the coop, followed by the gorgeous white PRE Andalusian cantering majestically along, next is the chestnut pony with sparkles painted on his butt, then the earth shakes as the 75% draft hammers by with leg feathers rippling, and after him is a tiny red & white appy pony outfitted in pink and guided by a determined child in pigtails. And so on.

                        A Friesian may make an appearance. There are the lovers of Morgans and Morgan crosses. There's a big pinto draft-cross who has carried many an amateur up the lower levels. There is an aged Welsh mare who sets land speed records around the course while her latest child rider clings to her mane. The pony knows what to do and doesn't take suggestions from riders (suggestions such as "whoa!" and "help!").

                        And of course in this neck of the woods there will be a selection of colorful pintos and appys, along with the common lot of grade sort-of-QH types. Plus some OTTB's, WB's, and UL veteran horses of every kind stepping back down the levels toward eventual retirement.

                        You can ride anything that is willing to carry you through 3 phases in eventing. You won't feel unique in warm-up!

                        I'm not sure there is such a thing as a 'non-traditional breed' in lower level eventing.

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                        • #32
                          Morgans were meant as a Jack of all trades. And one of my daughter's friend's shows an Arabian mare in her early 20's at 2'6" and 2'9". All the Arabians I've known have been quick with great lungs. Can't see how they wouldn't do well eventing. Isn't the modern TB descended from the Godolphin Arabian?

                          WB's are overtaking the TB in most other disciplines in this area. But the OTTB is still the go-to for many of the eventers because they're cheap and have the speed and stamina for X country. Ironically, I took a dressage lesson this week at an eventing barn. On a teenaged OTTB that is solidly 4th level and schools many of the higher level movements. I thought he was a Swedish WB at first. Great top line and uphill build.

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                          • #33
                            Originally posted by OverandOnward View Post
                            One of my most special volunteers moments was as a ring steward watching a Saddlebred calmly singlefooting between the fences over some lower level show jumping course. Had no idea that a horse could jump out of something other than a trot or canter, but honestly it was the best round of the day. Ears pricked, calm and sane, hit every spot dead on, never flinched, lovely form over the fences. (That is, I guess he was "singlefooting", it was a fast floating 4-beat gait that was so smooth, I nearly converted right way to Saddlebreds. LOL )

                            And one of the most fun parts of eventing spectating is taking a seat on the cross-country Beginner Novice course to watch the Parade of Breeds and Non-Breeds as they canter by.

                            Here comes the grade pinto energetically lifting his short legs over the coop, followed by the gorgeous white PRE Andalusian cantering majestically along, next is the chestnut pony with sparkles painted on his butt, then the earth shakes as the 75% draft hammers by with leg feathers rippling, and after him is a tiny red & white appy pony outfitted in pink and guided by a determined child in pigtails. And so on.

                            A Friesian may make an appearance. There are the lovers of Morgans and Morgan crosses. There's a big pinto draft-cross who has carried many an amateur up the lower levels. There is an aged Welsh mare who sets land speed records around the course while her latest child rider clings to her mane. The pony knows what to do and doesn't take suggestions from riders (suggestions such as "whoa!" and "help!").

                            And of course in this neck of the woods there will be a selection of colorful pintos and appys, along with the common lot of grade sort-of-QH types. Plus some OTTB's, WB's, and UL veteran horses of every kind stepping back down the levels toward eventual retirement.

                            You can ride anything that is willing to carry you through 3 phases in eventing. You won't feel unique in warm-up!

                            I'm not sure there is such a thing as a 'non-traditional breed' in lower level eventing.
                            I love this so much! We have that little Welsh mare's show jumping twinsie. Lol.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by downen View Post
                              This was many years ago, but I competed successfully through Training on a 14 hand Arab. I can't tell you his bloodlines because he was found as a stray (believe it or not) as a yearling. I won more blue ribbons with this guy than I ever thought possible! RIP Mighty Mouse.
                              Awwww! He reminds me of Karen O'Connor's pony, Teddy. (Which was part Arabian IIRC)

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by fanfayre View Post

                                For my BelgianxQH Prelim gelding it was joggers.
                                Dump trucks, buses, bicycles, motorbikes, dogs and walkers - not a glance, but a jogger, either from ahead or behind, would make him lose his $^i*. It was hilarious
                                i had a pair of huge, full Belgians for driving. They were half brothers. Nothing freaked them out in harness. In the barnyard, the younger was very buddy sour. It drove his "big" brother nuts because he liked his alone time. Went out to feed them one morning and the younger one had escaped & then realized he couldn't see his brother and started tearing up and down the grassy strip between the field and the driveway. There's no good way to stop an 18.1, 2000 lbs horse. I ended up standing on the fence, holding the feed scoop for the older horse who munched his breakfast as we both watched his crazy brother gallop back and forth like we were watching a tennis match.

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                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by OverandOnward View Post
                                  One of my most special volunteers moments was as a ring steward watching a Saddlebred calmly singlefooting between the fences over some lower level show jumping course. Had no idea that a horse could jump out of something other than a trot or canter, but honestly it was the best round of the day. Ears pricked, calm and sane, hit every spot dead on, never flinched, lovely form over the fences. (That is, I guess he was "singlefooting", it was a fast floating 4-beat gait that was so smooth, I nearly converted right way to Saddlebreds. LOL )

                                  And one of the most fun parts of eventing spectating is taking a seat on the cross-country Beginner Novice course to watch the Parade of Breeds and Non-Breeds as they canter by.

                                  Here comes the grade pinto energetically lifting his short legs over the coop, followed by the gorgeous white PRE Andalusian cantering majestically along, next is the chestnut pony with sparkles painted on his butt, then the earth shakes as the 75% draft hammers by with leg feathers rippling, and after him is a tiny red & white appy pony outfitted in pink and guided by a determined child in pigtails. And so on.

                                  A Friesian may make an appearance. There are the lovers of Morgans and Morgan crosses. There's a big pinto draft-cross who has carried many an amateur up the lower levels. There is an aged Welsh mare who sets land speed records around the course while her latest child rider clings to her mane. The pony knows what to do and doesn't take suggestions from riders (suggestions such as "whoa!" and "help!").

                                  And of course in this neck of the woods there will be a selection of colorful pintos and appys, along with the common lot of grade sort-of-QH types. Plus some OTTB's, WB's, and UL veteran horses of every kind stepping back down the levels toward eventual retirement.

                                  You can ride anything that is willing to carry you through 3 phases in eventing. You won't feel unique in warm-up!

                                  I'm not sure there is such a thing as a 'non-traditional breed' in lower level eventing.
                                  Spot on!
                                  Fat Cat Farm Sporthorses on Facebook
                                  Fat Cat Farm Sporthorses Website and Blog

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by Wanderosa View Post

                                    Awwww! He reminds me of Karen O'Connor's pony, Teddy. (Which was part Arabian IIRC)
                                    I was a big fan of Teddy's, too, and he did look strikingly like my Mighty Mouse, although a bit taller. RIP Teddy.
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                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by Sunny74 View Post
                                      Thanks everyone for sharing their stories!!

                                      downen- Mighty Mouse was a Rock Star!! His photos melted my heart. I guess, deep down, I’ll always be an Arabian lover!
                                      Thanks, Sunny74! He was a rock star, but not an easy one. He was a $200 dollar horse and all I could afford at the time, so we made it work with the help of a fabulous trainer who got our dressage on point. Arabs are pretty cool horses, and I especially love the sporty ones.They're so smart, and have amazing endurance. But if I had a dollar for everyone who told me at the time "Arabs can't event," I could have bought a new horse! Mighty Mouse turned out to be the horse of a lifetime, though, and I'll always treasure the memories we made.
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                                      • #39
                                        My eventing school master was a 15.3+ Appy who had gone Intermediate and been nationally ranked. I had him downgraded so I could do Novice (Pre-Traiining at the time), and eventually competed him thru Prelim. After he was retired, I had a 16.3 Appy (no TB in him, either) and showed him through Preliminary. I was on a TL Championship team that consisted of: A buckskin QH, my 15.3 loudly marked Appy, a 15.2 h.h. Araloosa, and a TB. The TB got eliminated on X-C, the QH, Araloosa and my Appl placed 1st, 2nd and 3rd. LOL!!

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          It's been decades since I've been eventing, but without too much effort I can think of at least a few arab-X, Andalusian, Appy, Friesian-X, Clydesdale-X, various pony-X, and quarter-horses who were competing at the equivalent of Prelim or higher around that time. My family had a horse of completely indeterminate breeding (we guessed maybe a pony-X-Andalusian or something equally ridiculous) go 1*. Honestly, as long as the horse is built well enough to jump a bit and gets his legs out of the way, and can manage to WTC in a dressage ring, there's no reason why not.

                                          We used to get a lot of Standardbreds (harness-racers) off the track when I was a kid at pony club, mostly because they could (and still can) be bought very cheaply. Not many of them could really cope with a dressage test, but oddly enough, a lot of them could jump quite well. So a lot of people just took the hit on their dressage score and evented them at low levels. Compared to the OTTBs, they were very calm and quiet, so you could really have a blast on them.

                                          I've seen some beautiful Morgans and Arabs, and various crosses of those, but I'd suggest if you want to do a bit of eventing, to get one which doesn't naturally go super inverted. Same would go for Saddlebreds. They don't have to go like purpose-bred warmbloods, but you want them to be comfortable with their job, at the end of the day.

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