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leasing dilemma

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  • leasing dilemma

    I have 2 choices on which horse to lease. Background on me: i switched to eventing about 2 years ago, i've done 1 CT and 2 events with the horse I am leasing now (Horse A). I have little XC experience outside of what I've done with Horse A and jumping random logs while trail riding. The CT and 1 event were at starter. the last event was BN. Both horses are warmbloods with dressage background.

    Horse A: 16 y/o Lazy, more experience jumping, trained to 1st level (although pretty rusty i think, he is not very good about moving laterally off the leg), very calm at shows. At our last BN event, we had the 3rd best dressage score in the whole competition (29, best in our division). we were clear in SJ but in XC we had 2 refusals so were eliminated. I have schooled with this horse in XC twice, plus 2 shows, plus he has been schooled once with previous owner. He has a tendency to run out of jumps in XC.

    Horse B: 18 y/o 2nd level schoolmaster (50+ dressage shows), nicely forward. I can work on myself more because I don't have to worry about forward. I'm just learning to do more advanced movements like shoulder in. I can do s/i on him decently (can't do it on the Horse A) and have nice straight leg yields and do flying changes (Horse A knows how but I can't get him to do them really since I have like 0 experience doing them). He has less jumping experience and no XC experience (to my knowledge). Seems to want to please more.

    I'm a bit worried about Horse B's soundness since he is 2 years older (does 2 years even matter or is it a lot?). Horse A is very beginner friendly so I fear if I switch to Horse B, I will not be able to change back if Horse B goes lame, etc. Is it worth the risk to switch to Horse B?

  • #2
    Eventing is really fun when you and your horse enjoy cross country. I think you should find a third option. Winning in the dressage phase only to be eliminated in cross country is discouraging.

    I wouldn't leap to Horse B until you know if he is willing to go cross country. If Horse B likes it, his age wouldn't bother me.

    Comment


    • #3
      You are playing what ifs, if you are not swapping simply because the horse is 2 years older. Both horses could injure themselves tonight and never be able to be ridden again, no matter what age. 3 or 30yo.
      It is better to ride 5 minutes a day than it is to ride 35 minutes on a Sunday.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would stick with the first horse until you find an actual experienced eventer to lease.
        Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

        Comment


        • #5
          What type of lease commitment are you making? Are the horses part of a barn leasing program or are these horses at different barns to be leased. Frankly I don't know that I'd rush to lease either unless the lease is like a month to month lease. You have 2 horses that aren't exactly eventing schoolmasters.

          Comment


          • #6
            I wouldn't switch to an unknown with limited jumping experience - not because of age, but because you don't know if he is suitable for what you need. Yes, dressage is a part of eventing but you need more than just a good dressage horse. Surely your trainer (if it is the same one as back in August) can help you find a more suitable horse to lease? Or, if the choices you have are based on finances and who is available at the barn I'd stick with A.

            Comment


            • #7
              For Starter/BN level I would give horse B a try, contingent on a few things:

              One - He has some (verified) jump schooling in his background, and
              Two - You have access to a good event coach who can take you out x-country to play with some little stuff and see what he thinks.
              Three - You don't have plans to upgrade too many levels (with this horse)

              It's so nice to see folks give the older good eggs another chance at an enjoyable job, if they're capable. Like gottagrey, I also think the lease arrangements are important. Only month to month until you have a read on his opinion

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by rockonxox View Post
                I wouldn't switch to an unknown with limited jumping experience - not because of age, but because you don't know if he is suitable for what you need. Yes, dressage is a part of eventing but you need more than just a good dressage horse. Surely your trainer (if it is the same one as back in August) can help you find a more suitable horse to lease? Or, if the choices you have are based on finances and who is available at the barn I'd stick with A.
                I don't think I could find a better horse than these 2 to lease in my area at least. I'm doing a feed/care lease ($200/month, 3 rides/week.). usually these type of cheap leases are on green horses, so i consider myself lucky that i get decently trained horses. i have paid more to lease green horses.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by gottagrey View Post
                  What type of lease commitment are you making? Are the horses part of a barn leasing program or are these horses at different barns to be leased. Frankly I don't know that I'd rush to lease either unless the lease is like a month to month lease. You have 2 horses that aren't exactly eventing schoolmasters.
                  it's a month to month thing. I've been leasing horse A since Feb of this year. They are at the same barn (and part of the lesson program). Both are the same price.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by ohmyheck View Post
                    For Starter/BN level I would give horse B a try, contingent on a few things:

                    One - He has some (verified) jump schooling in his background, and
                    Two - You have access to a good event coach who can take you out x-country to play with some little stuff and see what he thinks.
                    Three - You don't have plans to upgrade too many levels (with this horse)

                    It's so nice to see folks give the older good eggs another chance at an enjoyable job, if they're capable. Like gottagrey, I also think the lease arrangements are important. Only month to month until you have a read on his opinion
                    my trainer thinks horse A (and maybe B) could get me to training and after that I would plan to buy a horse (unless I could find one of that level to lease).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What are your goals? You have done very little CC training. While dressage is a big part of eventing, the necessity of doing S/I, etc doesn't appear until the upper levels. What you need is an old campaigner who has lots of CC experience along with jumping experience.

                      How much mileage has your trainer at Prelim and above. That's what I feel it takes to be able to assess the suitability of a horse/ rider combo with plans to move up to Training.
                      Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                      Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        OP, your initial posts and subsequents remarks are all centered in dressage-thinking. Not eventing, not even jumping.

                        Why do you think you want to do eventing? If you say you were eliminated on xc "after 2 refusals", you haven't even learned the rules. You don't write like someone who has any real interest in eventing.

                        From your own account, you say you "switched to eventing 2 years ago" but it doesn't sound as if this switch really happened. In two years you seemed to have gained very little real eventing experience. You are still on dressage horses. Do they jump much? How much cross country schooling have they had from an experienced eventing rider? If the answer is "not much" and "not much", they are not eventing horses. Neither is a good choice for eventing.

                        Lease an eventing horse to do eventing. Use an eventing-only training to coach you. Take a consuming, obsessive interest in eventing. Don't compromise, even if you know other riders who are doing so and think they have it good. They don't.

                        You won't be leaving dressage behind, but you will be expanding your horizons significantly. But if your heart isn't in it, just stick with the dressage that is clearly fulfilling for you, or something else that you are actually into.

                        I'm speculating, but, avoid any trainer who is not a dedicated eventer. Trainers crossing over from other disciplines who erroneously think that they they can translate just that experience to eventing are a danger to their students. They do not know what they need to know about terrain and cross-country riding.


                        Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
                        What are your goals? You have done very little CC training. While dressage is a big part of eventing, the necessity of doing S/I, etc doesn't appear until the upper levels. What you need is an old campaigner who has lots of CC experience along with jumping experience.

                        How much mileage has your trainer at Prelim and above. That's what I feel it takes to be able to assess the suitability of a horse/ rider combo with plans to move up to Training.
                        ^^^ This. OP, please take this ^ well-said post to heart.

                        Comment


                        • #13


                          Regarding these two horse choices, the subsequent 'Training Level' comments by the OP also gave me pause. Just not reassured at all regarding the level of eventing know-how in this scenario..?

                          Keen riders whose mounts have good flat work can certainly train with a solid eventing coach and have fun learning some basic SJ and XC skills sufficient for Starter etc.. , without having to go find an experienced campaigner IMHO.

                          Pony Clubbers come to mind. A good number do exactly this because the (often new to eventing) horse they have when they join PC is the one they progress with, until it's decided by the family that the resources and passion are there to support a move to a different mount (if required) to move up.

                          So with the new info provided by the OP, my opinion is that probably neither of these two chaps fit the bill

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So I understand the dilemma, I agree that an eventing schoolmaster would be better, but the fact is you have horse A or horse B or nothing.

                            If you can, take horse B xc schooling. If he is honest and confident and good about it, he might be the go. BUT not all horses are, there is every chance if he has not been on XC hardly ever, or ever, he may want no part of it.

                            Otherwise horse A is fine, yes he has stops, but my guess is he is a bit trickier to ride, and is going to make you work for it. Nothing wrong with that, it will improve your xc riding also.

                            Comment

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