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Switching discipline..thoughts?

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  • Switching discipline..thoughts?

    So I've been considering this for sometime now and just want to hear people's opinion. I got my horse 3 years ago when he was 10, and has done some show jumping and foxhunting in the previous life. After I got him we started eventing, and basically taught him dressage and worked very hard on xc.
    So BN was not too bad, but once we got to novice, he's been having quite a bit of confidence issues on xc. He actively looks for the next jump in the SJ phase, but he practically looks lost on the XC field and is just not a brave horse. I've invested a lot of money and energy trying to make him an eventer, but frankly, there's always a little voice telling me that he might not actually enjoy doing eventing. He's scopey and athletic, but if he cannot be brave on xc, I'm not sure he's really cut out to be an eventer. He just looks so alive in the SJ arena and becomes a nervous chicken as soon as we leave the start box.
    Should I just go do jumpers with him? I've never actually done rated jumpers and wouldn't even know where to start.

  • #2
    Ive been thinking of switching too. Ive been an eventer for as long as I can remember, and my current horse is a good XC and athletic.
    However im older now and I no longer wish to give all my weekends up to travel hundreds of kilometers to shows that have 3 chances to get eliminated and only one too win.
    I did a few unreg show jumping shows this season, and won some classes, I was out for a day at most, the entries were cheaper, I have several chances to place during the day, and if we had a bad class, there was always another one to pick yourself up from.
    You dont get the same adrenalin rush as XC, but I have to say, I think I will probably convert too.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would not recommend starting with rated shows - hit the local/schooling show circuit first. the rules are rather similar to the stadium stage of eventing (or close enough not to cause panic and brain melts) however I would definitely read the class descriptions and requirements as some are speed classes (no jump off, time only) and others are power/speed (clear then into the jump off), then there is a dividing line between heights (if you ride the 1m class you cannot ride the 0.70 class - usually)

      Check your state Hunter/Jumper Association calendar for the show dates and go watch the first one. Depending on where you ride you may have to dial it down to the region's website.

      Do you work with a trainer? Talk to her (?) about attending some local shows - pick a handful of classes and have a blast. Lots of chances to place, the classes are usually cheap-ish and the people are a blast but I do recommend either going with a trainer or a good buddy that can give guidance for the first couple of shows.



      Edited to add - its late and i'm on allergy pills - im re-reading that you were not really talking about A & AA level show, just regular jumper classes.
      Last edited by oppsfelldown; Sep. 6, 2018, 12:49 AM. Reason: reading is hard tonight

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by oppsfelldown View Post
        I would not recommend starting with rated shows - hit the local/schooling show circuit first. the rules are rather similar to the stadium stage of eventing (or close enough not to cause panic and brain melts) however I would definitely read the class descriptions and requirements as some are speed classes (no jump off, time only) and others are power/speed (clear then into the jump off), then there is a dividing line between heights (if you ride the 1m class you cannot ride the 0.70 class - usually)

        Check your state Hunter/Jumper Association calendar for the show dates and go watch the first one. Depending on where you ride you may have to dial it down to the region's website.

        Do you work with a trainer? Talk to her (?) about attending some local shows - pick a handful of classes and have a blast. Lots of chances to place, the classes are usually cheap-ish and the people are a blast but I do recommend either going with a trainer or a good buddy that can give guidance for the first couple of shows.



        Edited to add - its late and i'm on allergy pills - im re-reading that you were not really talking about A & AA level show, just regular jumper classes.
        Yes if we're starting out definitely it'll be starting with local shows for sure. Do you pre-enter the classes? In eventing there's always time assigned, is that how it works in a jumper show or is it like I get there then entering however many classes?
        I have so many questions!
        I do have a trainer but she's only done eventing in the past so I'm not sure how much help it'll be.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by kiwichick View Post
          Ive been thinking of switching too. Ive been an eventer for as long as I can remember, and my current horse is a good XC and athletic.
          However im older now and I no longer wish to give all my weekends up to travel hundreds of kilometers to shows that have 3 chances to get eliminated and only one too win.
          I did a few unreg show jumping shows this season, and won some classes, I was out for a day at most, the entries were cheaper, I have several chances to place during the day, and if we had a bad class, there was always another one to pick yourself up from.
          You dont get the same adrenalin rush as XC, but I have to say, I think I will probably convert too.

          Yea I do enjoy eventing and the rush on XC but I didn't think it'd be fair to push a middle aged horse to learn something he's never been comfortable with. I think if I do get a second horse at some point, maybe an OTTB I would still like to go back to eventing but at this point of my life, maybe it's time to do something else for a while.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ebott2015 View Post

            Yes if we're starting out definitely it'll be starting with local shows for sure. Do you pre-enter the classes? In eventing there's always time assigned, is that how it works in a jumper show or is it like I get there then entering however many classes?
            I have so many questions!
            I do have a trainer but she's only done eventing in the past so I'm not sure how much help it'll be.
            Typically you would pre-enter your classes or nominate yourself for a division (i.e. entering the 1.00m division with one class per day).

            There will be no times assigned... depending on the show/ring you'll either have an assigned order of go or it will be sign-up at the gate... but what time your class starts often depends on how quickly the classes before you run. You may run into problems with gate holds for trainers at other rings etc slowing stuff down, so trying to approximate what time you will be riding can be an exercise in futility

            If you have more questions the H/J forum is good!

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm not an eventer although I am a big fan of the sport, so maybe I'm not qualified to respond, but I think a horse who is truly scared or chicken as you say, should not be forced into the cross country phase. Its almost cruel IMO and one thing I especially admire about event horses is their bravery. Without it I would wonder how safe your horse will be in that phase. I'm a strong believer in letter the horse choose what discipline he is happiest in. Sometimes that might even require selling him, but give SJ a try, you might love it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I do think that it is important to
                listen to the horse. And not to force a square peg into a round hole. That said...are you setting this horse up for success? Brave confident horses are made. That means proper schooling. You as a rider giving him direction...not looking to him to drag you around. This horse has been out fox hunting...that is following a group. He is likely confused as to his new job. There isn't a huge difference between BN and Novice. So what has changed in your riding and his prep?

                but if you want to change. That's also fine. Jumpers can be fun too.
                ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
                  I do think that it is important to
                  listen to the horse. And not to force a square peg into a round hole. That said...are you setting this horse up for success? Brave confident horses are made. That means proper schooling. You as a rider giving him direction...not looking to him to drag you around. This horse has been out fox hunting...that is following a group. He is likely confused as to his new job. There isn't a huge difference between BN and Novice. So what has changed in your riding and his prep?

                  but if you want to change. That's also fine. Jumpers can be fun too.
                  I think he's more of a worried horse. It took me a good two years to build up his confidence and one fall at a show this year, even though it was totally my fault, he's back to square one. He just looks so much happier in the SJ arena. If I had gotten him before his previous experience, he might have turned out differently. Problem is he's already 13 and trying to infuse confidence in a horse this age take way too much work for little reward.

                  Comment

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