• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

one rein stop - emergency breaks?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • one rein stop - emergency breaks?

    I thought I'd pick your brain over this subject a bit...

    I have a very big, very strong STB mare who I've been allowing a gallop each day because it really seems to get the ticks out - we're working on straight and low and it's tough for her so she needs to blow off steam and it really seems to help. I've not been on a true runaway horse since I was a teen - today was close as the hay was down and I think she was just a bit more excited than usual.

    Afterward I had a flashback as a teen when I sat deep and pulled the head around and inadvertently squeezed with my knees which sent us forward but sideways and I lost my seat and hit the dirt hard.

    Today I stayed out of my seat and on my stirrups until she slowed down - then I straightened her out and we regained composure ...I was probably spared because we were running out of soft ground and she hit the barnyard pavement (or it could have been even worse...I shudder to think). I did pull her head around a bit but was relectant to sit down because I knew I'd grip - I know this about me.

    What do you do and what has worked. And do you practice this move? How?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Stop galloping until you can do it with control.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

    Comment


    • #3
      I have seen horses running off with people at the walk.
      Running off means you can't stop or steer and it can happen any time, any gait.
      You need to train for control at any gait, then you won't be run off with, unless there is something wrong with the running off horse's brain.

      Speed, how fast you are going, should not be a reason to be out of control.
      Race horses are running all out, but still under control.

      At speed, you don't try to stop a horse in a couple of strides, but you are in control and can stop in a few strides if you have to.

      Try training so the horse keeps coming to hand, many half halts, changes of direction, stops and backs, starting at the walk and by the time you get to gallop, your horse should know to keep listening.

      If you ever feel a horse is about to quit listening to you, get it's attention back on you, don't let it keep going on it's own, unless it was your idea.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bluey View Post
        I have seen horses running off with people at the walk.
        Running off means you can't stop or steer and it can happen any time, any gait.
        You need to train for control at any gait, then you won't be run off with, unless there is something wrong with the running off horse's brain.

        Speed, how fast you are going, should not be a reason to be out of control.
        Race horses are running all out, but still under control.

        At speed, you don't try to stop a horse in a couple of strides, but you are in control and can stop in a few strides if you have to.

        Try training so the horse keeps coming to hand, many half halts, changes of direction, stops and backs, starting at the walk and by the time you get to gallop, your horse should know to keep listening.

        If you ever feel a horse is about to quit listening to you, get it's attention back on you, don't let it keep going on it's own, unless it was your idea.
        But typically that training does NOT start with the fastest gait.
        Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Bluey, I appreciate your response and suggestions that are useful - thank you! Today I never felt my horse wasn't listening but I think she came close to it for a brief moment but it was fleeting ~ she may have been feeling more confident in this exercise, less inhibited if you will. It was the biggest gallop she's ever done with me on her back and I was content that she heard my voice and composed when I asked (I was caught off guard with how fast that was because she hadn't gone full throttle before this). But this is why I asked the question - I certainly don't want to *wish* I'd thought more about it, mid air.

          Bluey's answer was quite sufficient but I would still like to hear what other ideas people may have or interesting experiences. I once knew a person who galloped horses for a living that was ran off with and dumped badly. This person was well-equipped and I didn't ask any questions about why it ended that way...but now I'm curious.

          Comment


          • #6
            Taking off can happen at any gate but the gallop is by far the most traumatizing mentally.
            http://www.naturalhorsesupply.com/onereinstop.shtml
            That is a decent write up about it and it can be done safely from any gate given you have enough strength to get it done. DD was trotted off with recently and it was one of those did he just take off with my daughter?! Being 7 she has 0 chance of even attempting to do this so we just work at it slowly and make sure we realize its happening and stop pony. Biggest barrier I have found is really realizing WHEN the horse/pony is running off with you and when they are just ignoring you. I have been run off with several times with horses but the worst one was my first one where the horse took off at a full blown gallop and ran what seemed like forever and there was literally nothing I could do as I was just not strong enough or smart enough to realize what was happening.
            Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
            Originally Posted by alicen:
            What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

            Comment


            • #7
              My short answer is I wouldn't even think of trying a one rein stop on a full out galloping horse. Your prior experience illustrates that such a maneuver will end badly.

              When I gallop horses, they are on the bit, I'm up out of the saddle and have the reins bridged, and we roll along in a good rhythm, me with enough rein contact to steer/support, and enough balance to stay aboard if horse goes a little sideways from say, a blowing plastic bag. In the context of galloping, taking a stronger grip on the reins or with one's legs is telling the horse to go faster. This, humorously, is often referred to as a 'runaway' when in fact the horse thinks it's doing exactly what is being asked.

              When I am done galloping, I drop the reins, relax my body, and say whoa (well, not precisely whoah, I have a 'huh-ho' that says okay, we're done, let's start winding down). Horse knows that signal to start relaxing and slowing. If for any reason I need to stop more quickly- well, horse is in relaxed nongallop mode and a half halt series down to full halt will do the trick.

              If I were you, I'd gallop this STB mare in a nice large arena until you, and she, are on the same page as to which buttons mean what.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Thank you for the link leil...good point about the kids perception of a runaway.

                Originally posted by Beverley View Post

                If I were you, I'd gallop this STB mare in a nice large arena until you, and she, are on the same page as to which buttons mean what.
                Most definitely Today was fun, but enlightening.

                When I posted this question earlier I was actually asking if a one-rein stop is a legitimate way to stop a horse (thanks for answering that Beverley!) because as I felt *that* gallop today, the LAST thing I would have wanted to do at the fastest point would have been to toss us out of balance. Yet, this is commonly taught - maybe not even taught, but many people will spit it out like it's a fact. I'm certain that was why I did it when I was a teenager. I'm grateful that I forgot it today.

                I also had to chuckle at the runaway comment...it's usually the case, isn't it? Or people say they were "thrown" even when they fell off. My daughters friend asked my daughter this morning if she'd ever been thrown and I was impressed when dd said "no, but I've fallen off!".

                Comment


                • #9
                  I never heard of "one rein stop" until a few years ago, on the internet and it seemed a hairbrained idea.
                  It still does, but I don't know in practice, not having tried it.

                  We started and trained race horses and few ever ran away.
                  Those were then exercised by the more experienced riders, but most riders could handle the rest without problems.
                  We used the technique explained above by Beverly.
                  When galloping, your hands give the horse a "fifth foot", supports it, so when you don't, the horse then knows to slow down.
                  You don't want a race horse to run off and get himself crippled with uncontrolled speed, that he may not be trained and fit for yet, or hurt the rider, if running off too far then possibly miss a race from it, so you don't put someone that can't handle those horses on them.

                  On that "one rein stop", for what I understand, it is some kind of "disengaging the hind end" you are supposed to teach a horse standing there, then practice walking and trotting and loping around slowly and so if and when a horse is thinking of bolting, you can ask it that kind of disengaging" and avoid the horse taking off with you.

                  That "one way stop" is not to be used once you are on a run away, because then, done at speed, the chances of the horse falling with you and it has happened to some, is very real.

                  The trouble I see is that, once the horse engages again, it probably is still thinking of acting up, unless you are proactive and put it to work and do it without setting it off again.

                  If you train a horse and you aquire the skills to keep it under control and don't ride it where you can't control it, then that the horse may bolt won't be a question.
                  That to me is a better solution than teaching and depending on "one rein stops".

                  I think that the OP was doing fine already, just wondering what if, if it had gotten to the point of running off, not just a strong, fast gallop, but still under control.

                  When training horses, you learn in a hurry how to use all your aids and the hands on the reins are generally playing on the horse like on an instrument, each one independent of the other and along with the other aids.
                  That is what keeps you communicating with your horse.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    meh what people yap about and what they either a) do and or b) know, are often wildly disparate things.

                    If I determine at let's say a high trot that Dobbin's goofy and not paying me the slightest bit of attention, he'll potentially get a myriad of tools thrown his way, one of which MIGHT be a ORS where I shove his hinds L and pull his face to the R and fold him around and get him back on Page 43. But we'll have sorted this all out endlessly before we go a gallopin'.

                    I gallop only the good horses, and if one like my dear sweet Chippy decides to peal his eyelids back and hit another gear in a gallop- and I think it's safe-then I tell myself I can ride faster than you can run, bebop, so giddyup Asking them for 7th gear tends to empty the oxygen tank A ORS on a bolter or a runaway that has already hit mach one? Stupid.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      sorry...double post...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The one rein stop was never designed for run aways -- at least that is my understanding. It is for PREVENTING runaways. Bluey is right that it works by disengaing the hindquarters, which is actually having one hind leg cross deeply underneath the horse.

                        You don't have to be an expert in equine biomechanics to see that doing this at speed can have disasterous consequences. Would NOT recommend it.

                        Instead, you can start to circle the horse (if you have the space); start off big and work to a smaller circle.

                        If you are going straight and have no other option, do NOT lean forward and take a grip on the horse's mouth and pull back. This is the natural instinct for most of us, but that is just like hitting most horses with a hot-shot -- it just drives them forward. Instead, sit down as much as you can, relax you body/legs and use your hands to "tease" the horse back to you -- alittle pull, then release; repeat. Don't give them a platform to brace against.

                        And train your horse with voice commands. This takes ALOT of time and many, many repetitions (like 1,000s!), but it WILL work.

                        A good friend of mine (endurance rider) was starting a young Arab gelding who was a very hot boy. Among her other training, she used "WHOA" alot. Like every single time she asked the horse to stop -- both in the saddle and on the ground.

                        Fast forward a few years. She was riding his guy in a ride at a rolling canter and he was merrily tossing his head, which he tended to do from time to time. Well, he gave one REALLY big toss and off came his headstall!! (she rode in a mechanic hackmore).

                        Horse kept going and even increased his rate. So there she was on this hard, high desert trail, full of rocks and other icky (painful) objects and by this time she & her horse (Rio) are moving along at close to a dead gallop. She told me she considered baling, but was too chicken.

                        Finally she just sat back in her saddle, pulled on the reins (which were now more of a "neck loop") and said loudly, "RIO --- WHOA!!!!!"

                        And without a moment's hesitation he put on the brakes and slid to a stop. Then he looked back at her, as if to say, "What? We were having so much fun!"

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by Kyzteke View Post

                          Horse kept going and even increased his rate. So there she was on this hard, high desert trail, full of rocks and other icky (painful) objects and by this time she & her horse (Rio) are moving along at close to a dead gallop. She told me she considered baling, but was too chicken.
                          Oh my...I shuddered just thinking about THINKING about bailing! Great story

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Might not apply to the OP, but it is also useful NOT to practice the same gallop up the same route (especially back to the barn) every time. It can start to turn into a bad habit. If you do want to do some speed work, do it in different places, in different directions, and always always start and stop when YOU ask, not when the horse offers.

                            I remember (among other, worse experiences) being on a rental trail ride, coming out into a big field, and the guide said "do you guys want to canter?" I felt that canter coming about fifty feet before he asked. I guessed they cantered the horses in that same spot every single time. After however many times that had happened, there was going to be a canter in that field whether I wanted to or not!!!

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Excellent point...I have used the same spot, but we also do circles and walk/trot there regularly too. I realized that she anticipated it this morning so we did some circles and went to a walk then we started...so yes, it IS relevant! Thank you!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Depending on the fitness of the horse, you can also try cantering (galloping) them up a hill -- most aren't inclined to run off when they are working that hard.

                                However, keep in mind that all this galloping will just get her fitter and fitter....that's why they gallop racehorses after all, and that may not be what you are ultimately looking to do.

                                So maybe look at other ways for her to "decompress..."

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I have posted about the ORS so many times I just can't do it again. Do a search in the Dressage forum for my posts. There is a lengthy one or two in there. One or two here in endurance too I believe.

                                  Cliff notes version:

                                  ORS has nothing to do with strong arming the head around to your boot. It's about disengaging the hindquarters and shutting off the engine. The horse doesn't go where the nose points. The horse goes where the shoulder points. Horse can gallop full out with nose tucked in its arm pit.

                                  Teach at the halt first, then walk, then trot, then canter. You get the idea.

                                  One of my horse's first "rides": http://www.hphoofcare.com/TrainingORS.jpg Teaching the ORS from halt. Rein totally slack. SEAT and LEG control HINDQUARTERS. Hinds have to cross over each other laterally. Has very little to do with the head.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Kyzteke View Post
                                    And train your horse with voice commands. This takes ALOT of time and many, many repetitions (like 1,000s!), but it WILL work.


                                    This is what I do- all of my guys will stop on a dime at the word WHOA! I use it every singe time I stop ( in hand, under saddle, etc) until it is completely ingrained in the brain.

                                    Other than that I would really learn how to put your arse in the saddle, sit like you weigh a ton of bricks, open your hip and anchor your hands with a bridged rein. Do not let her pull you forward! Personally, I would take her to some place where you could go about forever and practice- walk, halt; trot, halt; canter, halt; hand gallop, halt; gallop, halt and keep going till you get the message.
                                    "As soon as you're born you start dyin'
                                    So you might as well have a good time"

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Auventera Two View Post
                                      Horse can gallop full out with nose tucked in its arm pit.
                                      Um, no.

                                      You got one that can do that, please post a picture.

                                      The last person I saw attempt a one rein stop, on a horse that wasn't even galloping full out, slid into home plate on the asphalt. Not pretty, but thankfully no big injuries for either party.

                                      As has been noted, it's a tool for keeping a 'potential' runaway from getting up a head a steam. Not one I have any use for myself, but if it works for folks, great.

                                      To attempt it on a full out galloping horse would be, in my opinion, a stupid idea.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        It is odd to me how the "one rein stop" seems to have replaced the pully rein. They are not the same thing. I am required to teach the Pully rein or emergency stop to all my lesson students as per my insurance. I imagine that is fairly standard.

                                        I do find it effective as a lesson as it gives riders an idea of what to do to balance themselves if they feel they are going faster than they would like and unable to slow down fast enough. I have used the pulley rein on horses that have gotten rude/quick (say after a jump) although not for a while now!

                                        I think what many people are using when they talk about one rein stops is in fact a pulley rein.
                                        Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X